Islamic Pottery or Pottery of the Arab World *Photograph scans in this presentation are from Pottery of the Islamic World ...
Defining Islamic/Arab <ul><li>Islamic pottery: Islamic Empire ( Iran, Turkey and Spain) </li></ul><ul><li>Arab world potte...
Pre-Islamic pottery types <ul><li>Unglazed,  </li></ul><ul><li>unsophisticated  </li></ul><ul><li>everyday wares </li></ul...
Methods: <ul><li>Hand </li></ul><ul><li>Wheel </li></ul><ul><li>Mold </li></ul><ul><li>Drying: some vessels were cracked a...
Decorating pots: <ul><li>Stamps </li></ul><ul><li>Slips sgraffiato incised through the slip to the pot </li></ul><ul><li>A...
Glazing <ul><li>can be done once the pot is dried or after firing, firing makes the pot stronger </li></ul><ul><li>( if th...
<ul><li>Open firing: </li></ul><ul><li>http://islamicceramics.ashmolean.org/Technology/firing-kiln.htm </li></ul><ul><li>K...
pre and early Islamic periods  2nd - 8th century <ul><li>Faience- originated in Egypt </li></ul>
early Abbasid period: Iran, Iraq and Central Asia(9th to early 11th century) <ul><li>Lead glazed relief ware </li></ul><ul...
Lead glazed relief ware-Syria <ul><li>Roman </li></ul><ul><li>Earthen ware </li></ul><ul><li>Moulded decoration </li></ul>...
Splashed ware <ul><li>Surface decorations of green, brown, yellow under transparent glaze. </li></ul><ul><li>Inspired and ...
Opaque white or tin glazed <ul><li>Imitating  Chinese white porcelain </li></ul><ul><li>Cobalt blue (Iraq) </li></ul><ul><...
Slip painted ware- Iran <ul><li>Slip applied to prevent the color from running. </li></ul><ul><li>Nishapur polychrome(huma...
 
Lustre-painting <ul><li>Already used by the Copts of Egypt </li></ul><ul><li>Brown, red, and yellow colors </li></ul>
<ul><li>  Fatimid period in Egypt and North Africa ( 10th - 12th century) golden age of pottery production </li></ul>
 
<ul><li>Colored monochrome glaze </li></ul><ul><li>Yellowish or red earthenware </li></ul><ul><li>Coated with color monoch...
<ul><li>Lustre painted wares </li></ul><ul><li>Figural designs, every day activities </li></ul><ul><li>Elaborate drawings ...
<ul><li>North African polychrome painted in glaze wares(Morroco, Algeria,Tunisia, Libya, and Spain) </li></ul><ul><li>Deve...
Iranian Sgraffiato(11th- 13th)
the Seljuk period of Iran(11th-13th) <ul><li>1- Sgraffiato- Egyptian Copts </li></ul><ul><li>Designs are carved out then g...
<ul><li>Bamiyan bowls- large pedastal characterized by manganese and green splashes. </li></ul><ul><li>2- composite white ...
 
 
Ayyubid ceramics of Syria and Egypt ( 12th=13th) <ul><li>Laqbi, l’abi- partially incised and partially relief- plates or d...
The ilkhanid and timurid pds of Iran and central asia  13th -16th  <ul><li>Monochrome </li></ul><ul><li>Lustre: changes, r...
 
Mamluk ceramics of Lebanon ( 13th- 16th) <ul><li>Glazed : sgraffito, slipped beneath a lead glaze </li></ul><ul><li>Yellow...
 
Hispano Moresque ceramics of Spain  13th-18th  <ul><li>Malaga- production centers </li></ul><ul><li>Moorish patterns were ...
Safavid and Qajar Ceramics(18th-19th) <ul><li>Kubachi wares: several types, blue, black and green; blue scrollwork and flo...
 
Ceramics of Ottoman Turkey (16th-19th) <ul><li>Iznik major pottery center </li></ul><ul><li>Iznik pottery : polychrome in ...
Morrocan ceramic(18th- 19th <ul><li>Little is known about early production of this type until the 17 th  century </li></ul...
Modern pottery: <ul><li>Jerusalem pottery </li></ul><ul><li>Interesting audio: </li></ul><ul><li>Changing times jeopardize...
 
Additional Resources <ul><li>Book </li></ul><ul><li>http://books.google.com/books?id=B2f0PX1bi18C&pg=PA18&lpg=PA18&dq=Muse...
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Ceramics Of The Arab World(3)

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This presentation took place at the Dearborn Historical Museum for the Mid States Ceramics group, May 20, 2009

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Ceramics Of The Arab World(3)

  1. 1. Islamic Pottery or Pottery of the Arab World *Photograph scans in this presentation are from Pottery of the Islamic World In the Tareq Rajab Museum, Geza Fehervari, 1998.
  2. 2. Defining Islamic/Arab <ul><li>Islamic pottery: Islamic Empire ( Iran, Turkey and Spain) </li></ul><ul><li>Arab world pottery: would include, Phoenician, Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, etc.. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Pre-Islamic pottery types <ul><li>Unglazed, </li></ul><ul><li>unsophisticated </li></ul><ul><li>everyday wares </li></ul><ul><li>Moulded, relief or painted </li></ul>
  4. 4. Methods: <ul><li>Hand </li></ul><ul><li>Wheel </li></ul><ul><li>Mold </li></ul><ul><li>Drying: some vessels were cracked and wrapped </li></ul><ul><li>Firing: 900-1000 C </li></ul>
  5. 5. Decorating pots: <ul><li>Stamps </li></ul><ul><li>Slips sgraffiato incised through the slip to the pot </li></ul><ul><li>Appliqué </li></ul><ul><li>Painting- under glaze: decorating under the glaze, usually blue and black- this technique later developed into the Iznik style pottery. </li></ul><ul><li>Over glaze: decorating after the pot has been fired, requires another firing(600-700 C) </li></ul><ul><li>In-glaze: early Islam, opaque white glaze(powder like), pigment of cobalt blue for decorating, liquid was absorbed from the pigment and thus it became one with the glaze. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Glazing <ul><li>can be done once the pot is dried or after firing, firing makes the pot stronger </li></ul><ul><li>( if there is a puddle of glaze in the center then the pot was upright when fired, if there is some gathered at the rim the pot was fired face down) </li></ul><ul><li>Transparent </li></ul><ul><li>Or opaque: tin oxide(imitating the Chinese porcelain) </li></ul><ul><li>How was the glaze made? </li></ul><ul><li>Two materials were combined, and heated until dry then crushed into a powder . water or vinegar was added to make the glaze </li></ul><ul><li>toxic materials! </li></ul><ul><li>Firing once again: </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Open firing: </li></ul><ul><li>http://islamicceramics.ashmolean.org/Technology/firing-kiln.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Kiln firing: </li></ul><ul><li>http://islamicceramics.ashmolean.org/Technology/firing-kiln.htm </li></ul>
  8. 8. pre and early Islamic periods 2nd - 8th century <ul><li>Faience- originated in Egypt </li></ul>
  9. 9. early Abbasid period: Iran, Iraq and Central Asia(9th to early 11th century) <ul><li>Lead glazed relief ware </li></ul><ul><li>Origin is Roman </li></ul><ul><li>Earthenware </li></ul><ul><li>Moulded decoration </li></ul><ul><li>Imitating metal vessels </li></ul>
  10. 10. Lead glazed relief ware-Syria <ul><li>Roman </li></ul><ul><li>Earthen ware </li></ul><ul><li>Moulded decoration </li></ul><ul><li>Imitating metal vessels </li></ul>
  11. 11. Splashed ware <ul><li>Surface decorations of green, brown, yellow under transparent glaze. </li></ul><ul><li>Inspired and related to Chinese T’ang period polychrome </li></ul>
  12. 12. Opaque white or tin glazed <ul><li>Imitating Chinese white porcelain </li></ul><ul><li>Cobalt blue (Iraq) </li></ul><ul><li>Copper green, yellow, inscriptions (Iran) </li></ul>
  13. 13. Slip painted ware- Iran <ul><li>Slip applied to prevent the color from running. </li></ul><ul><li>Nishapur polychrome(humans) </li></ul><ul><li>Manganese purple over white(Kufic) </li></ul><ul><li>Polychrome on white ground slip, red, yellow and green </li></ul><ul><li>Yellow staining black ware </li></ul>
  14. 15. Lustre-painting <ul><li>Already used by the Copts of Egypt </li></ul><ul><li>Brown, red, and yellow colors </li></ul>
  15. 16. <ul><li> Fatimid period in Egypt and North Africa ( 10th - 12th century) golden age of pottery production </li></ul>
  16. 18. <ul><li>Colored monochrome glaze </li></ul><ul><li>Yellowish or red earthenware </li></ul><ul><li>Coated with color monochrome glaze </li></ul><ul><li>Decorated with incised florals </li></ul><ul><li>Lustre painted wares </li></ul><ul><li>North African polychrome painted in glaze wares </li></ul>
  17. 19. <ul><li>Lustre painted wares </li></ul><ul><li>Figural designs, every day activities </li></ul><ul><li>Elaborate drawings </li></ul><ul><li>Baytar(10-11) </li></ul>
  18. 20. <ul><li>North African polychrome painted in glaze wares(Morroco, Algeria,Tunisia, Libya, and Spain) </li></ul><ul><li>Development of splashed ware </li></ul><ul><li>Yellow, manganese against a mustard or dark yellow background </li></ul>
  19. 21. Iranian Sgraffiato(11th- 13th)
  20. 22. the Seljuk period of Iran(11th-13th) <ul><li>1- Sgraffiato- Egyptian Copts </li></ul><ul><li>Designs are carved out then glazed with transparent glaze </li></ul><ul><li>Amol ware- Caspian sea- green, red lead glaze </li></ul><ul><li>Champleve- incised out of the slip </li></ul><ul><li>Aghkand ware- polychrome sgraffiato- animals and birds </li></ul>
  21. 23. <ul><li>Bamiyan bowls- large pedastal characterized by manganese and green splashes. </li></ul><ul><li>2- composite white fritwares, Seljuk white, </li></ul><ul><li>3- silhouette wares evolved from champleve </li></ul><ul><li>Designs were painted rather than incising. </li></ul><ul><li>4- lustre ware- </li></ul>
  22. 26. Ayyubid ceramics of Syria and Egypt ( 12th=13th) <ul><li>Laqbi, l’abi- partially incised and partially relief- plates or dishes-birds or animals. </li></ul><ul><li>Sgraffiato </li></ul><ul><li>Monochrome </li></ul><ul><li>underglazed </li></ul><ul><li>Blue and white wares </li></ul>
  23. 27. The ilkhanid and timurid pds of Iran and central asia 13th -16th <ul><li>Monochrome </li></ul><ul><li>Lustre: changes, rounded flaring sides, cobalt blue </li></ul><ul><li>Underglazed </li></ul><ul><li>Sultanabad pottery- </li></ul><ul><li>A-grey slip, designs were moulded and reserved in white with black outlines </li></ul><ul><li>B- painted in two colors black, cobalt blue(blue)- rounded sides, with everted and inverted flat rims </li></ul><ul><li>C-round bowls with flaring sides in two or three colors under a clear glaze </li></ul><ul><li>Change in Minai ware, black, white and red, relief designs; </li></ul><ul><li>New types introduced: blue and white </li></ul>
  24. 29. Mamluk ceramics of Lebanon ( 13th- 16th) <ul><li>Glazed : sgraffito, slipped beneath a lead glaze </li></ul><ul><li>Yellow and green glaze </li></ul><ul><li>Yellow and brown slip </li></ul><ul><li>; lead glaze; tin glaze; alkaline glaze </li></ul><ul><li>unglazed </li></ul>
  25. 31. Hispano Moresque ceramics of Spain 13th-18th <ul><li>Malaga- production centers </li></ul><ul><li>Moorish patterns were </li></ul><ul><li>replaced by European </li></ul><ul><li>coat of arms, ships and </li></ul><ul><li>animals </li></ul>
  26. 32. Safavid and Qajar Ceramics(18th-19th) <ul><li>Kubachi wares: several types, blue, black and green; blue scrollwork and flowers, polychrome, human, landscapes </li></ul><ul><li>Celadon imitations: </li></ul><ul><li>Blue and white Kirman polychrome; black was used to outline the designs </li></ul><ul><li>Late lustre:lost appeal in 14 th century gained some back: chocolate brown, copper red even pinkish </li></ul><ul><li>Gombroon: finest wares,fine and thin faience body; open work similar to Chinese </li></ul><ul><li>Qajar polychrome: mid 19 th water pipe base, flowers, </li></ul>
  27. 34. Ceramics of Ottoman Turkey (16th-19th) <ul><li>Iznik major pottery center </li></ul><ul><li>Iznik pottery : polychrome in red, blue, green and white </li></ul>
  28. 35. Morrocan ceramic(18th- 19th <ul><li>Little is known about early production of this type until the 17 th century </li></ul><ul><li>Fes was an important center </li></ul><ul><li>When Granada fell potters moved to Morocco </li></ul><ul><li>Polychrome </li></ul><ul><li>Large bowls, ewers and dishes </li></ul><ul><li>Yelow, or white groundslip painted with blue, green and black; floral and geometric </li></ul>
  29. 36. Modern pottery: <ul><li>Jerusalem pottery </li></ul><ul><li>Interesting audio: </li></ul><ul><li>Changing times jeopardize Lebanon's long relationship with pottery </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.dailystar.com.lb/article.asp?edition_id=1&categ_id=1&article_id=97188 </li></ul>
  30. 38. Additional Resources <ul><li>Book </li></ul><ul><li>http://books.google.com/books?id=B2f0PX1bi18C&pg=PA18&lpg=PA18&dq=Museum+of+Islamic+Pottery,&source=bl&ots=dBBh8YXCZL&sig=6AKRK_2GGDvjQa2elmgiiiaptQE&hl=en&ei=R0sCSty0CIGUMsP-1eEH&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9#PPA23,M1 </li></ul><ul><li>Museum collection http://www.islamonline.net/servlet/Satellite?c=Article_C&cid=1158658353493&pagename=Zone-English-Youth%2FYTELayout </li></ul><ul><li>Article: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.asia.si.edu/collections/islamicHome.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Study: </li></ul><ul><li>http://islamicceramics.ashmolean.org/ </li></ul>

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