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Moving Schools from Good to Great!
 

Moving Schools from Good to Great!

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C. Travis Sutton - Moving Schools from Good to Great! - for an East Tennessee State University/ELPA presentation (ADMN-0001-592 - North East Cohort '093)...

C. Travis Sutton - Moving Schools from Good to Great! - for an East Tennessee State University/ELPA presentation (ADMN-0001-592 - North East Cohort '093)
Based on the book: Why Some Companies Make the Leap…and Others Don’t Good To GREAT! Author: Jim Collins

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    Moving Schools from Good to Great! Moving Schools from Good to Great! Presentation Transcript

    •   Moving from Good to Great! C. Travis Sutton ADMN-0001-592 - North East Cohort '093 East Tennessee State University January 8, 2011 Based on the book: Why Some Companies Make the Leap…and Others Don’t Good To GREAT by Jim Collins
    • Good to Great is a business approach.
    • The Challenge : There were companies that are NOT necessarily born with great business DNA as pointed out in Jim Collins’s prior book, Built to Last . The challenge is how does “good” or mediocre companies and even bad companies achieve enduring greatness?
    • The Study What are the universal distinguishing characteristics that cause a company to go from good to great!  Over 5 years….Over 28 companies  The research team compared and contrasted good-to-great companies to other companies that failed to make the leap from good-to-great. The study included such companies as Coca-Cola, Intel, General Electric, Merck, etc.
    • The Findings Level 5 Leaders : The research team was shocked to discover the type of leadership required to achieve greatness. The Hedgehog Concept (Simplicity within the Three Circles): To go from good to great requires transcending the curse of competence. A Culture of Discipline : When you combine a culture of discipline with an ethic of entrepreneurship, you get the magical alchemy of great results. Technology Accelerators: Good-to-great companies think differently about the role of technology. The Flywheel and the Doom Loop : Those who launch radical change programs and wrenching restructurings will almost certainly fail to make the leap.
    • Applying Jim Collins’s findings to School Leadership Hopefully, we can utilize successes from companies, with schools, other organizations and/or life in general.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Greatness is a matter of conscious choice.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great First who and then what.
    • “ First figure out your partners, then figure out what ideas to pursue. The most important thing isn't the market you target, the product you develop or the financing, but the founding team.” – Jim Collins
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Good is the enemy of great and is not an organizational problem; it’s a human problem.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great A fundamental element of a visionary organization is a core ideology – a set of core values and purpose – which guide and inspire people throughout the organization.
    • STUDENTS Students should inspire schools. Students should NOT be an excuse for schools not moving from good to great .
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great You must maintain unwavering faith that you can prevail, regardless of the difficulties, AND at the same time face the brutal facts.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Collegiality- cooperative interaction among colleagues; supporting colleagues in their work.  
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Professionalism an action that supports the willingness to agree to disagree; recognizing colleagues with professional status, methods, character, or exceptional standards.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Product/Student-centered the idea of planning, teaching, and assessing around the interest, needs and abilities of the students; a focus that is tuned into what is important to the student.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Teachers should have enormous ambition – but their ambition is first and foremost for the school, not themselves.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Leading Teachers: See teaching as a function and not a role; Build a shared vision for the organization; Place the school’s goals ahead of personal goals.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Great schools continually remind themselves of the crucial distinction between core and non-core values, between what should never change and what should be open for change, between what is truly sacred and what is not.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Core values are the organization’s essential and enduring tenets, not to be compromised for short-term expediency.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great High profile charismatic leaders are fine, but not required for great organizations.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great The only way to deliver the people who are achieving is not to burden them with the people who are not achieving.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Put your best people on your biggest opportunities , not your biggest problems .
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Good to Great schools continually refine the path to greatness with the brutal facts of reality .
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Simplify a complex world into a single organizing idea, a basic principle or concept that unifies and guides everything.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Hedgehog Concept: Good to Great organizations are like hedgehogs – simple creatures that know “one big thing and stick to it.”
    • The Hedgehog Concept : The fox knows a little about many things A fox is complex A hedgehog knows only one big thing very well The hedgehog is simple The Hedgehog Wins!!
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Hedgehog Concept: The key is to understand what your organization can be best at and equally important what it cannot be best at – not what it wants to be best at.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Hedgehog Concept: The Hedgehog Concept is not a goal – it’s an understanding.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great People (students and teachers) don’t work day-to-day in the “big picture.” They work in the nitty - gritty details of the business. Not that the big picture is irrelevant, but it’s the little things that send powerful signals about the organization.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Disciplined People Disciplined Thought Disciplined Action
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Disciplined action without disciplined people is impossible to sustain, and disciplined action without disciplined thought is a recipe for disaster.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great No matter how dramatic the end result, the good-to-great transformations never happened in one fell swoop...
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Visionary organizations focus primarily on winning (bettering) themselves.
    • “ Level 5 leaders are differentiated from other levels of leaders in that they have a wonderful blend of personal humility combined with extraordinary professional will. Understand that they are very ambitious; but their ambition, first and foremost, is for the company's success. They realize that the most important step they must make to become a Level 5 leader is to subjugate their ego to the company's performance. When asked for interviews, these leaders will agree only if it's about the company and not about them.” --Jim Collins
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Level 5 Leaders: Embody a mix of personal humility and personal will; Display workmanlike diligence – more plow horse than show horse.
    • First steps to develop level 5 leaders • Set and share the vision • Build discipline and governance • Manage changes proactively • Bring on board committed people “Empower your future leaders with knowledge and skills”
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Great organizations/schools focus on “clock building” not “time telling.”
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Level 5 Leaders don’t preach about how they value change and constant improvement, they institute organizational mechanisms to stimulate change and improvement .
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great The very act of stating a core ideology influences behavior toward consistency with the ideology.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Great organizations translate their core values and ideologies into tangible mechanisms that are aligned with the values.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Sustainable transformations follow a predictable pattern of buildup and breakthrough.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great Leaders have to shift from seeing the organization (school) as a vehicle for the products (children), to seeing the products (children) as a vehicle for the organization (school).
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great The critical question asked by great schools/teahers is not, “How are we doing?” The critical question for great schools/teachers is, “How can we do better tomorrow than we did today?” This question becomes a way of life, a habit of the mind.
    • Moving Schools from Good to Great You must ask, "What do we mean by great results?" Your goals don't have to be quantifiable, but they do have to be describable. Some leaders try to insist, "The only acceptable goals are measurable," but that's actually an undisciplined statement. Lots of goals—beauty, quality, life change, love—are worthy but not quantifiable. But you do have to be able to tell if you're making progress. – Jim Collins
    • Reference Collins, J. (2001). Good to great: why some companies make the leap…and others don’t . New York, (HarperCollins Publishers Inc.). C. Travis Sutton