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Webinar - REN 21 Global Status Report 2012 - Asia Pacific focus

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The findings in the REN21 2012 Global Status Report (GSR) speak to the cumulating effect of steady growth in renewable energy markets, support policies and investment over the past years. In …

The findings in the REN21 2012 Global Status Report (GSR) speak to the cumulating effect of steady growth in renewable energy markets, support policies and investment over the past years. In 2011:

Renewable sources supplied 16.7% of global final energy consumption. The share of modern renewables increased, while the share of traditional biomass slightly declined.
118 countries –more than half in the developing world– implemented RE targets.
Investment in renewables increased 17% to a record $257 billion, despite a widening sovereign debt crisis in Europe and rapidly falling prices for renewable power equipment.
Photovoltaic module prices dropped by 50% and onshore wind turbines by close to 10%, bringing the price of the leading renewable power technologies closer to grid parity with fossil fuels such as coal and gas.
A series of webinars will present the report and will provide regional focus. Go in depth and behind the scenes of the REN21 report with Christine Lins, Executive Director of REN21.

Mr Arne Schweinfurth will provide regional focus for Asia Pacific in this session.

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  • 1. Leonardo Energy,REN21, and CleanEnergy SolutionsCenterREN21 Renewables 2012Global Status Report:Asia Pacific FocusSeptember 5, 2012Fernando Nuño – ModeratorChristine Lins – PresenterArne Schweinfurth - Presenter
  • 2. Some Housekeeping items 21. Audio is over IP. Use your headset or loudspeakers2. Introduce yourself using the “introductions” window3. Send your questions along the presentation using the “Q&A” window. They will be answered after the presentation4. Presentation and recording of the webinar will be available in the Leonardo Energy web and in the Clean Energy Solutions Center web. • http://www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-ren-21-global-status-report-2012-asia- pacific-focus • http://cleanenergysolutions.org/training 9/4/2012
  • 3. Agenda 3• Welcome and Introductory Remarks• Overview of Leonardo Energy, and the Clean Energy Solutions Center – Fernando Nuño  Leonardo Energy• Overview of the REN21 Renewables 2012 Global Status Report – Christine Lins  Executive Secretary, REN21• Asian Focus: – Arne Schweinfurth  Renewable Energy Support Programme for ASEAN at GIZ• Question & Answer• Discussion and Closing Remarks
  • 4. Clean Energy Ministerial & UN Partnership 4 Supporting the Solutions Center• Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM) launched the Clean Energy Solutions Center in April, 2011 for major economy countries • One of eleven CEM Initiatives • Led by Australia and U.S. with other CEM partners• Partnership with UN-Energy is extending scope to support all developing countries • Enhance resources on policies relating to energy access, small to medium enterprises (SMEs), and financing programs • Offer expert policy assistance to all countries • Expand peer to peer learning and training 9/4/2012
  • 5. How You Can Get Involved 5 • Request expert assistance or tailored technical resources for your country • Participate in webinars, training activities, and policy networks • Offer advice and suggest resources to share • Sign up for the newsletter • Join conversations on the Policy Forum 9/4/2012
  • 6. Leonardo Energy 6• Leonardo Energy initiative (LE) unites professionals from all over the world dedicated to electrical power and sustainable energy. LE provides education, training, and the comprehensive exchange of expertise. www.leonardo-energy.org 9/4/2012
  • 7. Speakers 7 Christine Lins was appointed as Executive Secretary of REN21, the Renewable Energy Policy Network of the 21st Century, in July 2011. During the last 10 years, she served as Secretary General of the European Renewable Energy Council, the united voice of Europe’s renewable energy industry. Lins has more than 15 years of working experience in the field of renewable energy sources. Previously, she worked in a regional energy agency in Austria promoting energy efficiency and renewable energy sources. Lins holds a masters degree in international economics and applied languages. 9/4/2012
  • 8. Speakers 8 Arne Schweinfurth studied Economics in Cologne (Germany), Madrid (Spain) and Montreal (Canada) with a focus on Energy Economics and Environmental Politics. As a consultant for The World Bank, and other organisations he worked on renewable energy, especially photovoltaic, renewable energy financing and energy subsidies. Since 2010 Arne Schweinfurth is advisor for renewable energy at the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH in Indonesia, working in Jakarta, where he manages the Renewable Energy Support Programme for ASEAN (ASEAN-RESP). 9/4/2012
  • 9. Click to edit Master title style • Click to edit Master text styles – Second level STATUS REPORT 2012 GLOBAL Click level edit Master title style • Third to Key Findings – Fourth level » Fifth levelChristine Lins Click to edit Master subtitle styleExecutive Secretary of REN21 christine.lins@ren21.net www.ren21.net Webinar focussing on Asia - Pacific 9/4/2012 9
  • 10. ClickAbout REN21 to edit Master title style Multi-stakeholder Policy Network grouping: • Click to edit Master text styles  National governments: Brazil, Germany, Denmark, UK, Spain, Norway, India, UAE, US,level Morocco, etc. – Second Uganda, • Third level  International organisations: EC, IEA, IRENA, UNEP, UNIDO, UNDP, ADB, GEF, etc. – Fourth level » Fifth level  Industry associations: RENAlliance (WWEA, WBA, IGA, ISES, IHA), ARE, GWEC, EREC, etc.  Science & Academia: SANEDI, IIASA, TERI, etc.  NGOs: WWF, Greenpeace, ICLEI, CURES, WRI, etc. Objective: enable a rapid global transition to renewable energy REN21 Secretariat based at UNEP in Paris/France 9/4/2012 10
  • 11. REN21 Click to edit Master title Renewables Global Status Report style Launched on June 11, 2012 along with UNEP’s Global trends in RE investment Team of over 400 Contributors, researchers & reviewers worldwide • Click to edit Master text styles  Lead author (Janet Sawin) & Chapter authors – Second level  Regional Contributors , Technology contributors & Rural energy contributors Click level edit Master title style • Third to  REN21 Secretariat research support team – Fourth levelThe report features: » Fifth level Global Market Overview, Investment Flows, Industry Trends, Click to edit Master subtitle style Policy Landscape, Rural Renewable Energy All renewable energy technologies Sectors: power, heating/cooling, transport New elements in 2012:  Rural renewable energy www.ren21.net/GSR  Renewable energy & energy efficiency 9/4/2012 11
  • 12. Click to edit MasterRenewable Energy in the World title style • Click to edit Master text styles – Second level Click level edit Master title style • Third to – Fourth level » Fifth level Click to17% of global final energy consumption RE supplied an estimated edit Master subtitle style UN Secretary General’s goal : doubling the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix by 2030 Renewable energy continued to grow strongly despite policy uncertainty in some countries, the geography of renewables is expanding as prices fall and policies spread 9/4/2012 12
  • 13. Click toTOP 5 in 2012 edit Master title style• Click to edit Master text styles – Second level • Third level – Fourth level » Fifth level9/4/2012 13
  • 14. Global Market Overview – Master title Click to edit Power Markets style • Click to edit Master text styles accounted for nearly  Renewables half of the estimated 208GW of new – Second level electric capacity installed in 2011 Click level edit Master reached powerGW (+8%) • Third to  Renewable title style worldwide electric 1,360 capacity – Fourth level in 2011 » Fifth level  Renewable energy comprised more Click to edit Master subtitle style than 25% of global power generation capacity  20.3% of global electricity was produced from renewable energy 9/4/2012 14
  • 15. Global Click to edit –Master Coolingstyle Market Overview Heating & title • Click to edit Master text styles  Transition towards the use of larger systems, – Second level increasing use of CHP and Click to edit Master title style district • Third level schemes.  Growing trendFourth level – to use solar resources to generate level » Fifth process heat for industry. Click to edit Master subtitle style  Solar hot water used in over 200 million households and commercial buildings. 9/4/2012 15
  • 16. Click to edit Master titleGlobal Market Overview – Transport style• RE usedto form of electricity, hydrogen, biogas, liquid biofuels. Click in edit Master text styles Liquid biofuels provided 3% of global road transport fuel in – Second level 2011. • Third level – Fourth level Electric transport islevel tied directly with renewable energy » Fifth being through policy directives in many countries.9/4/2012 16
  • 17. ClickHydropower to edit Master title style  25GW of new hydropower was • Click to edit Master text styles added in 2011, increasing capacity by nearly 3%, bringing – Second level installed capacity to 970GW Click level edit Master title style • Third to  Globally hydropower – Fourth level generated 3,400TWh of » Fifth level electricity in 2011. China alone produced 663TWh followed by Click to edit Master subtitle style Brazil (450TWh)  Small, but growing, market is emerging for low capacity hydropower in Asia, Sub Saharan Africa and Latin America 9/4/2012 17
  • 18. ClickSolar Power to edit Master title style  30GW of new solar PV capacity came into being in 2011 • Click to edit Master text PV capacity in operation in 2011 is Solar styles – Second level about ten times the global total in 2006 Click level edit Master PV industrystyleUSD • Third to  Size of global title exceeds 100 billion per year. – Fourth level » Fifth level  460 MW of CSP installed in 2011 bringing the total installed capacity to 1.760 MW Click to edit Master subtitle style 9/4/2012 18
  • 19. ClickWind Power to edit Master title style • Click to edit Master text In 2011, 40GW of wind power  styles capacity was installed, increasing – Second level the total to 238GW. Click level edit Master growth rate of cumulative • Third to  Annual title style wind power capacity between 2006- – Fourth level 2010 averaged at 26% » Fifth level Click to edit Master subtitle style 9/4/2012 19
  • 20. Click toBiomass Energy edit Master title style • Click to edit Master text styles energy accounted for  Biomass over 10% of global primary – Second level energy supply in 2011 • Third level  The present global demand for biomass is 53EJ, mainly used – Fourth level for heating, cooking and » Fifth level industrial applications  Liquid biofuels production grew rapidly at 17% for ethanol and 27% for biodiesel  Europe is the largest market for pellets, biodiesel and biogas. 9/4/2012 20
  • 21. Geothermal Energyedit Click to Master title style  205 TWh (738PJ) of district heat and • Click to edit Master text styles electricity was provided by geothermal resources in 2011 – Second level  Heat output from geothermal Click level edit Master title style • Third to sources grew at 100%p.a. from 2005-2010; reaching 489PJ in 2011 – Fourth level  China led in direct geothermal » Fifth level energy use in 2010, followed by the United States, Sweden, Turkey, Click to edit Master subtitle style Japan and Iceland.  Geothermal power became more attractive due to flexibility offered by new technologies such as flash plants combined with binary bottoming cycles for increased efficiency. 9/4/2012 21
  • 22. Click toIndustry Trends edit Master title style c RE industry saw continued growth • Click to edit Master text styles in manufacturing, sales and installation – Second level Cost reductions (especially in PV Click to edit Master title style and onshore wind) contributed to growth • Third level – Fourth level Changing policy landscape in many countries  industry Fifth level » uncertainties, declining policy Click to edit Master subtitle style support, international financial crisis and barriers to trade Worldwide jobs in renewable energy industries exceeded 5 million in 2011; clustered primarily in bioenergy and solar industries. 9/4/2012 22
  • 23. Click toInvestment Flows edit Master title style  Total global investment in RE jumped in 2011to a record of $257 billion , up 17% • Click to edit Master text styles from 2010 (15 % for Asia Oceania region). – Second level  This is 6 times the level of investment in Click level edit Master title style • Third to 2004 and 94% more than the total investment in RE in 2007. – Fourth level  Total investment exceeds » Fifth level  $267 billion including estimated $10 billion (unreported) invested in solar Click to edit Master subtitle style hot water  ~$282 billion including the $25 billion invested in large hydropower (>50 MW)  Despite the rise in investment, the rate ofSource: UNEP/Bloomberg: Global Trends in Renewable Energy growth of investment was below the 37%Investment 2011 rise in investment from 2009 to 2010. 9/4/2012 23
  • 24. Investment Flows Click to edit Master title style The top 5 countries for total investment • Click to edit Master text styles in 2011 were China, USA, Germany, Italy and India. – Second level Investment in RE in China went up by • Third level 17% in 2011 – Fourth level Investment in RE» Fifth level a in USA made significant leap of 57% in 2011. Investment in Germany (excluding R&D) dipped 12% from the 2010 levels Investment in RE in India went up by 62% in 2011 9/4/2012 24
  • 25. Policy Click to Landscape edit Master title style  Targets in at least 118 countries up from the 96 • Click to edit Master text styles reported in previous year; – Second level more than half are developing countries. Click level edit Master Some setbacks resulting • Third to  title style – Fourth level from a lack of long-term » Fifth level policy certainty and stability in many countries Click to edit Master subtitle style  GSR2012 portrays efforts in systematic linking of energy efficiency and renewable energy in the policy arena. 9/4/2012 25
  • 26. Click to Policy Landscape edit Master title style Renewable power generation policies • Click to edit Master text styles remain the most common type of support policy; Feed-in-tariffs (FIT) and renewable – Second level portfolio standards (RPS) are the most Click to edit Master title style • Third level commonly instruments. FIT policies were in place in at least Fourth level and 27 – 65 countries states worldwide by » Fifth level early 2012. Policies to promote renewable heating and Click to edit Master subtitle style cooling expanded. Almost two-thirds of the world’s largest cities had adopted climate change action plans by the end of 2011, with more than half of them planning to increase their uptake of renewable energy. 9/4/2012 26
  • 27. Policy Targets foredit Asia Pacific Click to RE in Master title styleExamples of successful policy measures: • Click to editthe addition of styles Targets: India targeted Master text 130MW Second capacity in 2011 – of off-grid level Heating and Third level Korea required • Cooling: South all public buildings larger than 3000m2 to generate at leastFourth level heat – 10% of total demand through RE Fifth level » Transport: China is a significant part of the mandate calling for 220billion liters of biofuel by 2022 Labelling: Japan introduced the Green heat Certification Programme in 2010 for solar thermal, adding biomass in 2011 9/4/2012 27
  • 28. Energy Click to Access edit Master title style UN Secretary General’s goal: Global action to achieve universal access to modern energy services by 2030 • Click to edit Master text styles In order to achieve universal access for all, the current global investments on energy access of annual 9 billion USD need to be increased to 48 billion USD – Second level annually Click to edit Master title style 2.6 billion • Third level people still employed traditional cookstoves and open fires for heating and cooking in 2011 – Fourth level Large numbers of actors and programmes, with limited coordination, makes » Fifth level impact assessment and data collection in the region a big challenge Click to edit Master subtitle style Lower prices of renewable energy technology is allowing manufacturers to diversify into emerging markets Financial models in rural energy include: • Small retail markets • Public-Private micro financing initiatives • National/multi stakeholder programmes 9/4/2012 28
  • 29. Rural Renewable Energy in Asia Pacific style Click to edit Master title Electricity Access by Region • Countries such as Bangladesh,• Click to edit Master text stylesAfghanistan, Myanmar, and Pakistan continue to experience very low rates – Second level of rural electrification and to rely • Third level largely on traditional biomass – Fourth level •Philippines expanded its existing » Fifth level Rural Electrification Programme in 2011 with the goal of achieving 90% household electrification by 2017 •In Iran the Power Ministry, has electrified more than 233 households with decentralised PV systems.9/4/2012 29
  • 30. Click to editEnabling Framework Master title style • Click to edit Master text styles Enhanced energy Right policy security, more framework – Second level stable climate Click level edit Master title style • Third to – Fourth level » Fifth level Click to edit Master subtitle style Improved public health Increased productivity & growth Creation of jobs 9/4/2012 30
  • 31. REN21 facilitates global dialogue on Click to edit Master title styleRE transition Stay informed, Stay connected Contribute & Exchange… • Click to edit Master text styles – Second level • Third level – Fourth level » Fifth level15-17 January 2013 www.ren21.netincl. Launch ofREN21 Global Futures Report secretariat@ren21.net 9/4/2012 31
  • 32. ASEAN-RESP Global Status Report 2012Regional Perspective Asia-Pacific A Focus on the ASEAN Community Arne Schweinfurth GIZ RE Advisor Renewable Energy Support Programme for ASEAN (ASEAN-RESP) arne.schweinfurth@giz.de 04.09.2012 Seite 32
  • 33. ASEAN-RESPI. ASEAN-RESPII. RE Development in ASEAN Member StatesIII. Drivers and Barriers 04.09.2012 Slide 33
  • 34. ASEAN-RESPI. ASEAN-RESPII. RE Development in ASEAN Member StatesIII. Drivers and Barriers 04.09.2012 Slide 34
  • 35. ASEAN-RESPASEAN-RESP: GIZ international energy projects Ongoing projects 04.09.2012 Slide 35
  • 36. ASEAN-RESPASEAN-RESP: ASEAN Centre for Energy “Catalyst for the economic growth and development”; Coordinating regional activities in the energy sector; Initiating joint activities on energy among the ASEAN member states; Implementing the “ASEAN Plan of Action for Energy Cooperation”; Achieving the target of 15% of RE in the ASEAN energy mix. 04.09.2012 Slide 36
  • 37. ASEAN-RESPASEAN-RESP: Project Background Jointly implemented by ASEAN Centre for Energy (ACE) and GIZ; Supporting the implementation of the APAEC 2010-2015; Transfering regional know-how and experiences; Fields of activities - Networking within the RE sector - RE policy advice - RE capacity building 04.09.2012 Slide 37
  • 38. ASEAN-RESPI. ASEAN-RESPII. RE Development in ASEAN Member StatesIII. Conclusion and Discussion 04.09.2012 Slide 38
  • 39. ASEAN-RESPRE Development: ASEAN Community High and rising energy demand in all ASEAN member states (e.g. Indonesia: 7% p.a.); Increasing costs for fossil fuels; Energy security and stability of supply of political concern; ASEAN member states put RE on the political agenda - 5 ASEAN member states set concrete RE targets Financial and non-financial incentives for the RE sector are in place - 6 ASEAN member states provide financial and/or non-financial support 04.09.2012 Slide 39
  • 40. ASEAN-RESPIndonesia 04.09.2012 Slide 40
  • 41. ASEAN-RESPIndonesia: Increasing Costs for Energy GenerationEnergy mix in Indonesia by source (2011): NRE 5.03% Coal  Highly dependent on fossil fuels (95%); Natural 23.91% Gas 24.29%  Energy demand increasing by 7% per year; Crude Oil  Fuel as well as electricity prices subsidized; 46.77%  High electricity generation costs. Source: MEMR, 2012. 04.09.2012 Slide 41
  • 42. ASEAN-RESPIndonesia: Renewable Energy TargetsElectricity generation in Indonesia by source: Other RE Liquified Coal 5% 2% Bioenergy 5%Geothermal 5% Crude Oil 20%  Official target of 15% RE by 2025;  “Vision 25/25”: 25% by 2025; Natural Gas 30% Coal 33%  Largest share from geothermal and bioenergy. Source: MEMR, 2012. 04.09.2012 Slide 42
  • 43. ASEAN-RESPIndonesia: RE Support Instruments Income tax on dividend paid to foreign party at 10%; Exemption from VAT for taxable goods, machinery and equipment for RE utilization (not included spare parts); Exemption from import duty for - Goods and Machinery for development and capital investment - Capital Goods for construction and development of electricity industry Various further exemptions. 04.09.2012 Slide 43
  • 44. Indonesia: Feed-in-Tariffs Set for 2012 Years in Rp per kWh In USD per kWhBiomass Installed Capacity ≤ 10 MW, Medium Voltage n/a 975 0,1073 Installed Capacity ≤ 10 MW, Low Voltage n/a 1.325 0,1458Biogas Installed Capacity ≤ 10 MW, Medium Voltage n/a 975 0,1073 Installed Capacity ≤ 10 MW, Low Voltage n/a 1.325 0,1458Municipal WasteZero Waste, Capacity ≤ 10 MW, Medium Voltage n/a 1.050 0,1155Zero Waste, Capacity ≤ 10 MW, Low Voltage n/a 1.398 0,1538Sanitary Landfill, Capacity ≤ 10 MW, Medium Voltage n/a 850 0,0935Sanitary Landfill, Capacity ≤ 10 MW, Low Voltage n/a 1.198 0,1318 Conversion Factors for Regions in Indonesia:Geothermal a. Java / Bali, F = 1 interconnected with High Voltage 0,0970 b. Sumatra / Sulawesi, F = 1.2General FiT / Technology neutral c. Kalimantanm, West Nusa Installed Capacity ≤ 10 MW, Medium Voltage n/a 656 0,0722 Tenggara and Nusa East, F = 1.3 Installed Capacity ≤ 10 MW, Low Voltage n/a 1.004 0,1104 d. Maluku and Papua, F = 1.5Source: MEMR, 2012; GIZ, 2012. . 44 04.09.2012 Slide 44
  • 45. ASEAN-RESPIndonesia: Features High subsidies for conventionally generated electricity and fossil fuels hamper the development of RE and burden the state budget; RE support mechanisms are in place, but incomplete and not transparent (“case-by-case” decisions, no long-term guarantees); RE applications are already cost competitive in remote areas, but not fully accepted as alternative to conventional energy production; The banking sector does not include RE in its portfolio, project finance for RE is difficult to obtain. 04.09.2012 Slide 45
  • 46. ASEAN-RESPThailand 04.09.2012 Slide 46
  • 47. ASEAN-RESP Thailand: High Import Dependency Energy sources in Thailand: Natural Gas, Oil 37.98% 47,15%  Oil and gas main energy sources;  Total imported value of energy resources 37.5 billion USD (2011). CoalHydro (Import) 7,43% 2,49% Lignite 4,95% Source : MoE, 2012. 04.09.2012 Slide 47 47
  • 48. ASEAN-RESPThailand: Alternative Energy Development Plan 2012-2021 25% of alternative energy in energy consumption by 2021 - 9201 MW of electricity; 9335 ktoe of heat; 39.97 ML/day of biofuel Energy security and budget relief - Reduce oil imports for 574,000 million Baht (approx. 18 billion USD) - Promote private sector investment of 442,000 million Baht (approx. 14 billion USD) Climate change mitigation - Decrease CO2 emission for 76 million tons/yr until 2021 04.09.2012 Slide 48
  • 49. ASEAN-RESPThailand: RE Targets and Current Status (example)RE electricity generation in Thailand: Current Type Target 2021(MW) Capacity (MW) Wind 7.28 1,200 Solar 141.97 2,000 Hydro 95.70 1,608 Biomass 1,790 3,630 Biogas 169.54 600 Municipal Solid Waste 27.48 160 Tidal & Geothermal 0.30 3 TOTAL 2,232.27 9,201 Additional capacity: 774 MW p.a.!Source: MoE, 2012. 04.09.2012 Slide 49
  • 50. ASEAN-RESPThailand: Feed-in “Adder” on electricity price 2012 Adder (Based on figures, released Special Adder for Special Adder for 2010) Diesel Replacement Three Provinces Years in THB per kWh in USD per kWh in USD per kWh in USD per kWh Biomass Installed Capacity ≤ 1 MW 7 + 0,5304 + 0,0170 + 0,0330 + 0,0330 Installed Capacity > 1 MW 7 + 0,3120 + 0,0100 + 0,0330 + 0,0330 Biogas Installed Capacity ≤ 1 MW 7 + 0,5304 + 0,0170 + 0,0330 + 0,0330 Installed Capacity > 1 MW 7 + 0,3120 + 0,0100 + 0,0330 + 0,0330 Municipal Waste Landfill and Digestor 7 + 2,5896 + 0,0830 + 0,0330 + 0,0330 Thermal Process 7 + 3,6504 + 0,1170 + 0,0330 + 0,0330 Wind Installed Capacity ≤ 50 kW 10 + 4,6800 + 0,1500 + 0,0500 + 0,0500 Installed Capacity > 50 kW 10 + 3,6504 + 0,1170 + 0,0500 + 0,0500 Small/Micro Hydro 50 kW < Installed Capacity < 200 kW 7 + 0,8424 + 0,0270 + 0,3300 + 0,3300 Installed Capacity ≤ 50 kW 7 + 1,5600 + 0,0500 + 0,0330 + 0,0330 Solar 10 + 6,7704 + 0,2170 + 0,0500 + 0,0500 Source: MoE, 2012; GIZ 2012. 04.09.2012 Slide 50
  • 51. ASEAN-RESPThailand: Features Thailand was the first mover with regards to RE in the ASEAN region and successfully established a RE support scheme; Reliable feed-in mechanism (“Adder”, currently under revision) and financing scheme (Encon Fund) are in place; Thai example as “model” for several other countries in the region; Considerable private sector activity including the finance sector could be intitiated. 04.09.2012 Slide 51
  • 52. ASEAN-RESPMalaysia 04.09.2012 Slide 52
  • 53. ASEAN-RESPMalaysia: RE Targets and Current Status 9th Malaysia Plan (2006 – 2010) - Targeted RE capacity to be connected to power utility grid 350 MW; - Targeted power generation mix: 56% natural gas, 36% coal, 6% hydro, 0.2% oil, 1.8% Renewable Energy. RE as of december 2011 - Connected to power utility grid: 68.45 MW (20% from target); - Off-grid: > 430 MW (mainly private palm oil millers and solar hybrid). Increased government activities in order to achieve the set targets! 04.09.2012 Slide 53
  • 54. Feed-in Tariff RatesMalaysia: Feed-in-Tariff Range of FiT Rates FiT Annual Rate in Second Year Technology / Source (RM/kWh) Duration Degression (After Degression) {USD/kWh}Biomass (palm oil waste, 0.27 – 0.35 0.268 – 0.348agro based) 16 0.5% {0.09 – 0.12} {0.088 – 0.115}Biogas (palm oil waste, agro 0.28 – 0.35 0.278 – 0.348based, farming) 16 0.5% {0.09 – 0.12} {0.09 – 0.115}Mini Hydro 0.23 – 0.24 0.23 – 0.24 21 0% {~0.08} {~0.08}Solar PV & PP 0.85 – 1.78 0.782 – 1.63 21 8% {0.28 – 0.59} {0.258 – 0.538}Solid waste & Sewage 0.37 – 0.45 0.363 – 0.441 16 1.8% {0.12 – 0.15} {0.12-0.146}Source: MoE 2012.  Long term guarantee for FiT;  Grid access for RE guaranteed;  Costs passed on to consumers. 54 04.09.2012 Slide 54
  • 55. ASEAN-RESPMalaysia: Feed-in-TariffFiT Status and Updates (31 May 2012): Total Capacity (MW) Applications received 839 593.87 Approved Applications 474 381.19 Refused Applications 327 181.82 Applications in process 38 30.85 Source: MoE 2012.  Excess demand for installation permits;  Limited capacity to handle applications;  Revision of FiT. 55 04.09.2012 Slide 55
  • 56. Malaysia: Feed-in-TariffFiT Status and Updates (31 May 2012): RE Installed Generation Capacity No of Jobs (MWh) (MW) Biogas 412 126,514 16.48 Biomass 3,789 754,462 126.30 1,084 451,298 72.25 Mini Hydro 4,154 222,313 166.16 Solar PV Total Total 9,439 1,554,589 381.19 Source: MoE 2012. 56 04.09.2012 Slide 56
  • 57. ASEAN-RESPMalaysia: Features An elaborated and relatively transparent FiT scheme is in place, currently under revision; Attractive tariffs and conditions triggered a big demand among RE project developers, support scheme not able to fully absorb demand; Political commitment to RE development is very high in order to increase energy supply security; Successful attraction of RE manufacturing capacity (especially PV); Private financing of RE projects is still not available on a large scale. 04.09.2012 Slide 57
  • 58. ASEAN-RESPI. ASEAN-RESPII. RE Development in ASEAN Member StatesIII. Drivers and Barriers 04.09.2012 Slide 58
  • 59. ASEAN-RESPDrivers: Promising Preconditions Abundant renewable resources for energy generation in Southeast Asia Increasing energy demand and need for energy security; Volatile and rising costs for conventional energy generation; Decreasing costs for RE technology and grid parity in remote areas (small hydropower, PV); Low electrification rates and need to provide modern energy services to all households; Political will to promote RE (4 countries with feed-in schemes). 04.09.2012 Slide 59
  • 60. ASEAN-RESPDrivers: Highlight – Low Electrification RateElectrification Ratio in the ASEAN Unelectrified Electrification Rate Country Population (%) (million, approx.) Myanmar 26.0 44.4 Cambodia 24.0 10.6 Laos PDR 78.0 1.4 Indonesia 73.7 62.4 Total ASEAN-4 53.8 118.8 Philippines 89.7 9.5 Vietnam 97.3 2.1 Thailand 99.3 0.5 Malaysia 99.4 0.2 Brunei 99.7 0.0 Singapore 100.0 0.0 Total ASEAN-6 95.6 12.3 Total ASEAN-10 73.9 131.1 Source: WEO 2011; ASEAN-RESP 2012; PLN 2012; MoEM Lao PDR 2012. 04.09.2012 Slide 60
  • 61. ASEAN-RESPBarriers: Challenges in RE Inception and Take-Off (examples) INDONESIA • Lack of information related to policy, regulatory frameworks, financing mechanisms THAILAND • Lack of streamlined procedures related to • Need a longer timeframe for feed-in adder market and grid access rules and fiscal incentives • Financial institutions’ lack of • Need an appropriate incentives for each understanding on RE projects RE type • Need for a clearer policy and predictable PHILIPPINES support • Policy and regulatory frameworks under Thailand • Need to streamline procedures the RE Act need to be implemented • More transparent and elaborate grid • Banks have lack of confidence on RE interconnection rules projects • Need for a clearer policy on local content requirements, local industry and expertise Indonesia development Philippines Inception Take-Off Consolidation Source: ACE 2012. 04.09.2012 Slide 61
  • 62. ASEAN-RESPBarriers: Unclear Long-term Perspectives “Teething trouble” which accompanies new developments (Thailand, Malaysia) Lack of long-term predictability of RE support schemes (Indonesia) Intransparent procedures and case-by-case decision making (Indonesia) Lack of data and data inconsistency (ASEAN member states); Absence of a regional market (common technical norms and standards); Stable investment environment only partly established. 04.09.2012 Slide 62
  • 63. ASEAN-RESPThank you!Further information: http://resp.aseanenergy.org/ 04.09.2012 Slide 63
  • 64. Time for Q&A 64 Questions 9/4/2012
  • 65. Your participation is appreciated! 65 Thank you!An audio recording of this Webinar and the PowerPoint presentations will be available following the webinar Please visit:http://www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-ren-21-global- status-report-2012-asia-pacific-focus or http://cleanenergysolutions.org/training 9/4/2012