How to Incorporate Green Blogging into Your
Social Media
Jeff McIntire-Strasburg
sustainablog.org
Twitter: @sustainablog
A little bit about me
Trained as an English teacher/scholar
Mostly a lifelong environmentalist
Started sustainablog in Jul...
So, where'd you learn about
sustainability?
Paul Hawken's The Ecology of Commerce
Daniel Quinn's Ishmael series
Consistent...
Blogging & Sustainability: A Great
Match
Parallel growth of social media (including
blogging) and current wave of eco-
con...
The Cluetrain Manifesto and
Markets
Markets are conversations
That conversation goes on with or without you
“Green” is som...
Peter Senge's “Fifth Discipline”
Systems thinking
– “Ecological” in scope: interdependence,
holism, inputs & outputs
– The...
Green Blogging is about learning
We start with public engagement with ideas and
practices... even if we do it badly
We cha...
It's Less About...
Activism (at least in the traditional sense)
Teaching (at least not in the traditional sense)
Public Re...
Who's doing it well?: Blogs
Treehugger: environmentalism is cool, hip, stylish
Worldchanging: consistent interrogations of...
Who's Doing it Well?: Companies
Wal-Mart (yes, that Wal-Mart): setting BHAGs,
learning how to reach them, and engaging wit...
Who Could Do It Well?
Mommy bloggers
– Audience is already concerned beyond its
immediate needs
– Health & safety are prim...
Who Could Do It Well
Food Bloggers
– Already a huge sub-niche... food may be
one of the biggest environmental issues
peopl...
Who Could Do It Well
Fashion & lifestyle bloggers
– Design is a critical element of sustainable
thinking
– Green doesn't h...
Who Could Do It Well
Entertainment bloggers
– Obvious celebrity tie-ins
– Cuts across interests: music, film, sports,
etc....
Who Could Do It Well?
Business bloggers
– Conversations surrounding the value
propositions of “greener” products, services...
Take-aways
It's OK to learn on the job...
Engagement and conversation are key... no one
likes preaching
Meet your user whe...
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How to Incorporate Green Blogging into Your Social Media

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Slides from my presentation at the Show Me the Blog conference, 10/23/10, St. Louis

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How to Incorporate Green Blogging into Your Social Media

  1. 1. How to Incorporate Green Blogging into Your Social Media Jeff McIntire-Strasburg sustainablog.org Twitter: @sustainablog
  2. 2. A little bit about me Trained as an English teacher/scholar Mostly a lifelong environmentalist Started sustainablog in July, 2003 as a “writing to learn” experiment Went “pro” in 2006 with Treehugger, Green Options Media, and, later, Sundance Channel
  3. 3. So, where'd you learn about sustainability? Paul Hawken's The Ecology of Commerce Daniel Quinn's Ishmael series Consistent (daily) reading and writing... Engaging with the community at sustainablog... Went at this all backwards... starting doing, and then conceptualized later...
  4. 4. Blogging & Sustainability: A Great Match Parallel growth of social media (including blogging) and current wave of eco- consciousness Ideally, both are about interaction and learning... not messaging or “evangelism” Both are focused on journeys more than destinations.
  5. 5. The Cluetrain Manifesto and Markets Markets are conversations That conversation goes on with or without you “Green” is something that needs to be sold still... and not just in the form of green products “Green” is a concept that can enter multiple conversations/ “markets”
  6. 6. Peter Senge's “Fifth Discipline” Systems thinking – “Ecological” in scope: interdependence, holism, inputs & outputs – The flow of energy, materials and information... – Systems exist within environments
  7. 7. Green Blogging is about learning We start with public engagement with ideas and practices... even if we do it badly We challenge the mental models that we've inherited We invite others to do the same... We learn about what motivates others to take action (and it may not be environmentalism)
  8. 8. It's Less About... Activism (at least in the traditional sense) Teaching (at least not in the traditional sense) Public Relations (at least not in the traditional sense)
  9. 9. Who's doing it well?: Blogs Treehugger: environmentalism is cool, hip, stylish Worldchanging: consistent interrogations of systems and solutions Springwise: User-submitted examples of green start-ups Mother Earth News: aligning sustainability with “traditional American values”
  10. 10. Who's Doing it Well?: Companies Wal-Mart (yes, that Wal-Mart): setting BHAGs, learning how to reach them, and engaging with the blogosphere (both through their own blogs, as well as other bloggers) Seventh Generation: not only in producing more sustainable products, but in using social media as a platform for discussing broader issues (and taking a position on these issues)
  11. 11. Who Could Do It Well? Mommy bloggers – Audience is already concerned beyond its immediate needs – Health & safety are primary motivations – Already have an “in” with corporate America
  12. 12. Who Could Do It Well Food Bloggers – Already a huge sub-niche... food may be one of the biggest environmental issues people are discussing right now. – Green & Gourmet aren't polar opposites – Appeals to foodies sense of adventure
  13. 13. Who Could Do It Well Fashion & lifestyle bloggers – Design is a critical element of sustainable thinking – Green doesn't have to mean “crunchy” – Integrating values with purchasing decisions
  14. 14. Who Could Do It Well Entertainment bloggers – Obvious celebrity tie-ins – Cuts across interests: music, film, sports, etc. – Areas that produce huge footprints... particularly at the point of consumption
  15. 15. Who Could Do It Well? Business bloggers – Conversations surrounding the value propositions of “greener” products, services, processes – Establishes credibility with a concept valued highly by consumers – Creates self-organized focus groups for market research – Creates a space to engage (genuinely) with critics
  16. 16. Take-aways It's OK to learn on the job... Engagement and conversation are key... no one likes preaching Meet your user where they are Baby steps are OK... as long as they're understood in larger system

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