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Sustainable Product Design: An LCA Approach by Jeremy Faludi | SB Seminars
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Sustainable Product Design: An LCA Approach by Jeremy Faludi | SB Seminars

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Bring your company's product to class. Tear it apart and learn its LCA (Life Cycle Assessment). Then rethink it taking a cradle-to-cradle approach. Take this new learning back to the office to......

Bring your company's product to class. Tear it apart and learn its LCA (Life Cycle Assessment). Then rethink it taking a cradle-to-cradle approach. Take this new learning back to the office to incorporate in future product design.

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  • -
  • Energy use is the biggest priority, by far. Even for an already extremely energy-efficient building. Fix this w/ efficiency & by using renewable energy like PV. Then mfg, but only biggest mfg impacts. Transportation is irrelevant.
  • Greenhouse gas emissions show basically same exact story as overall eco-impacts.
  • Taking the manufacturing bar from the previous slides and breaking it into all the components of manufacturing, we get this. Sheet steel (light-gauge framing, fascia, roof decking) is by far the biggest impact for both total eco-impact and carbon. For total eco-impact, second biggest impact is raised flooring (more sheet steel, and some concrete). Then structural steel, etc. For carbon emissions, second biggest impact is structural steel, then foundation concrete, etc.
  • Summing up the top priorities from the previous slides, we get a list of design priorities for a green building.
  • To find out what matters for your product, have to do an LCA of it.
  • Compare the Frog bldg to an average building. You could compare your product to another, or an industry average if data available.
  • More meaningful to show all the eco-impacts, like this, but could confuse people, & there’s debate about how to weigh different variables.
  • Same graph as previous slide, but each issue broken out separately. Easier to understand, and avoids arguments about weighting. This’s ISO 14040 compliant comparison. Could just choose a few of these to publish - the most meaningful ones (respiratory inorganics, fossil fuel use... not radiation or ozone layer).
  • again comparing to average building Carbon payback in 5 - 7 years, depending on whether just efficient or also using solar PV to be grid neutral.

Transcript

  • 1. Sustainable Product Design: An LCA Approach Jeremy Faludi, LEED AP, Lecturer at Stanford University and Research Lead at Project Frog
  • 2. Life Cycle Assessment
    • Jeremy Faludi
    • Project Frog, Stanford University
    [ excerpt ]
  • 3. Case Study #2: Project Frog Modular Green Building
  • 4. Project Frog Life Cycle Impacts Energy use is the biggest priority, by far. Even for an already extremely energy-efficient building. Fix this w/ efficiency & by using renewable energy like PV. Then mfg, but only biggest mfg impacts. Transportation is irrelevant.
  • 5. Project Frog Life Cycle Impacts Greenhouse gas emissions show basically same exact story as overall eco-impacts.
  • 6. Manufacturing Impacts Taking the manufacturing bar from the previous slides and breaking it into all the components of manufacturing, we get this. Sheet steel (light-gauge framing, fascia, roof decking) is by far the biggest impact for both total eco-impact and carbon. For total eco-impact, second biggest impact is raised flooring (more sheet steel, and some concrete). Then structural steel, etc. For carbon emissions, second biggest impact is structural steel, then foundation concrete, etc.
  • 7.
    • Energy efficiency during operation
    • Renewable energy
    • Construction & materials
      • Sheet steel
      • Structural steel
      • Concrete
    What Matters Most In A Project Frog Building Summing up the top priorities from the previous slides, we get a list of design priorities for a green building.
  • 8.
    • ?
    • ?
    • ?
    What Matters Most In Your Product To find out what matters for your product, have to do an LCA of it.
  • 9. Meaningful Comparisons Compare the Frog bldg to an average building. You could compare your product to another, or an industry average if data available.
  • 10. Meaningful Comparisons More meaningful to show all the eco-impacts, like this, but could confuse people, & there’s debate about how to weigh different variables.
  • 11. Meaningful Comparisons Same graph as previous slide, but each issue broken out separately. Easier to understand, and avoids arguments about weighting. This is ISO 14040 compliant comparison. Could just choose a few of these to publish - the most meaningful ones (respiratory inorganics, fossil fuel use... not radiation or ozone layer).
  • 12. Ecological Return On Investment Again comparing to average building Carbon payback in 5 - 7 years, depending on whether just efficient or also using solar PV to be grid neutral.
  • 13.