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The Nature of Change: Stephanie Hilborne
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The Nature of Change: Stephanie Hilborne

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Making Space for Nature - The Lawton Review …

Making Space for Nature - The Lawton Review
Stephanie Hilborne OBE, Chief Executive, The Wildlife Trusts

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  • The vision for nature conservation as we know it started with Charles Rothschild, who was the first person to identify the importance of protecting ‘places’ for wildlife.
  • The group was tasked with exploring: “ if the collection of sites represent a coherent and robust ecological network for England, capable of responding to the challenges of climate change and other pressures”. And also: “ whether a more inter-connected network would be more effective today and in the future and, if so, how this could be delivered”.
  • Three categories of wildlife site identified: Tier 1 – primary purpose is nature conservation and have the highest level of protection (e.g. SSSIs) Tier 2 – designated for their high biodiversity value but do not receive full protection (e.g. Local Wildlife Sites) Tier 3 – landscape designations with wildlife conservation as part of their statutory purpose (e.g. National Parks) The extent to which the different tiers of sites separately and collectively comprise a network was examined by testing against five attributes
  • Tier 1 – primary purpose is nature conservation and have the highest level of protection (e.g. SSSIs)
  • Tier 2 – designated for their high biodiversity value but do not receive full protection (e.g. Local Wildlife Sites)
  • Tier 3 – landscape designations with wildlife conservation as part of their statutory purpose (e.g. National Parks)
  • Making Space for Nature – outcomes One of the key conclusions is that “In England, we don’t have a coherent ecological network of wildlife sites”. Only attribute (i) is substantially met: (i) The network will support the full range of England’s biodiversity and incorporate ecologically important areas, including special biodiversity
  • Many of the natural connections in our countryside have been degraded or lost, leading to isolation of sites.
  • The report includes 24 recommendations for practical action to achieve a coherent and resilient ecological network
  • Recommendation 3. Ecological Restoration Zones (ERZ) need to be established that operate over large, discrete areas within which significant enhancements of ecological networks are achieved, by enhancing existing wildlife sites, improving ecological connections and restoring ecological processes. Recommendation 2. Planning policy and practice should: Continue to provide the strongest protection to internationally important sites and strong protection from inappropriate development to SSSIs Provide greater protection to other priority habitats and features that form part of ecological networks, particularly Local Wildlife Sites, ancient woodland and other priority BAP habitats. Recommendation 12. Local authorities should take responsibility for the identification and monitoring of Local Wildlife Sites and the management of LWS must be improved.

Transcript

  • 1. Making Space for Nature Stephanie Hilborne
  • 2.  
  • 3. So far… … 100+ schemes … 1.7 million hectares
  • 4.  
  • 5.  
  • 6.  
  • 7. Heading
  • 8. Medway Living Landscape
  • 9. Making Space for Nature - Methodology
  • 10. Tier 1 = 6.9%
  • 11. Tier 2 = 6.5%
  • 12. Tier 3 = 23.5%
  • 13. Making Space for Nature - outcomes
  • 14. Coincidence of BAP habitats with wildlife site tiers
  • 15. Level of fragmentation
  • 16. Making Space for Nature - recommendations
    • Four words used to describe what needs to be done:
    • more, bigger, better, and joined
  • 17. Making Space for Nature - recommendations
    • Recommendation 3.
    • Ecological Restoration Zones (ERZ)
    • Recommendations 2 and 12 relate to Local Wildlife Sites
  • 18. Making Space for Nature – what happened next...