• Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,299
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
81
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Why English Spelling is Such a Mess
    (Or, a Brief History of the English Language)
  • 2. Blame These Guys for Starting It
    In the 9th Century, Viking raiders began taking over the island we now know as England.
  • 3. Both spoke Germanic. Their languages merged to form Old English.
    The two most powerful invading tribes were the Angles and the Saxons
  • 4. Germanic Languages Beat Out Celtic
    Soon, everybody left who spoke Celtic was crammed into Ireland or Wales or Scotland.
    Scotland
  • 5. Or Maybe We Should Blame Caesar…
    Actually, the Celtic language had already been mixed up with Latin, thanks to the Roman Empire invading Britain in 55 BC.
  • 6. Hwaet!
    So, you start with Celtic,
    mix in Latin,
    add Germanic, bring to a boil and get Old English,
    but it doesn’t stop there…
  • 7. In 1066, the Normans conquered Britain, and guess what?
    They spoke French!
  • 8. Since the King spoke French…
    oui
    French became the language of the nobles, and only peasants spoke
    English
  • 9. Buy and Sell?
    Vin?
    You had to learn Frenchwords to deal with people with money.
  • 10. The Printing Press Made a Mess!
    Pronunciation kept changing, but printing stopped spelling from keeping up with the changes
  • 11. British trade by ship expanded world-wide
    Ketchup!
    Tycoon!
    and more foreign words were borrowed into English
  • 12. Colonization brought more foreign words into English
    hickory
  • 13. The world’s largest vocabulary
    Borrowing has made the English lexicon
    huge, versatile, expressive, and complex
  • 14. Close to a Universal Language
    Upwards of 350 million people speak English as their first language, with many morethan that using it as a second language
  • 15. So, that’s how its history made such an amazing mess of English
    And it keeps on borrowing, growing, and changing, even as we speak.