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Gastoschisis
Gastoschisis
Gastoschisis
Gastoschisis
Gastoschisis
Gastoschisis
Gastoschisis
Gastoschisis
Gastoschisis
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Gastoschisis

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  • 1. Gastrational Tract By Susheewa Wichaikull
  • 2. Gastroschisis
  • 3. In the womb, fetal intestines develop outside of the abdomen for a brief time. In normal cases, the intestines return to the abdominal cavity, and the baby's abdomen closes before birth. Gastroschisis
  • 4. Gastroschisis is an abdominal-wall defect that occurs on the side of the umbilical cord (umbilicus). The baby is born with intestines protruding through this defect, and no protective sac is present. Gastroschisis is rarely associated with other birth defects. Gastroschisis is a life-threatening defect, requiring immediate intervention.
  • 5. Before Operation Artrificial Sac
  • 6. Gastroschisis is an abdominal-wall defect that occurs on the side of the umbilical cord (umbilicus). The baby is born with intestines protruding through this defect, and no protective sac is present. Gastroschisis is rarely associated with other birth defects. Gastroschisis is a life-threatening defect, requiring immediate intervention. Operation
  • 7. The infant is cared for post-operatively in a neonatal intensive-care unit. He is placed in an isolette (incubator) to keep warm and avoid infection. Oxygen is provided, often through mechanical ventilation. Intravenous fluids, antibiotics, and pain medications are also given. A nasogastric tube is inserted to keep the stomach emptied of gastric secretions. Feedings through the nasogastric tube begin as soon as bowel function resumes. Post Operation
  • 8. These feedings are approached very slowly, and often infants are reluctant to eat. They may need feeding therapy and lots of encouragement.
  • 9.  

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