MSc Patient safety: information resources - Aberdeen 0910

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Material as of 09/10 for Masters programme - overview of planning a search, resources and other relevant topics

Material as of 09/10 for Masters programme - overview of planning a search, resources and other relevant topics

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  • 1. Finding reliable information for assignments and dissertations (introduction) MSc Patient Safety 2009/10
    • Susan McCourt
    • QML Floor 2, x3287
    • [email_address]
  • 2. Aims
    • Expand current information retrieval skills
      • introduce information resources which will be relevant for group and individual project work
    • Provide contact points for help
  • 3. Session outline
    • Finding reliable information using
      • Catalogue
      • Databases e.g. Scopus
      • Search engines (Google, Google Scholar)
    • Bibliographies
    • Later in course – additional databases and sources
  • 4. Types of information
    • Primary literature: original writings on a subject e.g. journal papers/articles, reports, conference papers, patents, theses
    • Secondary literature: material published about primary literature e.g. textbooks, reviews or tools that point to primary literature e.g. abstracts, indexes, bibliographies
  • 5. Looking for information – source types
    • Academic (internal sources)
      • library catalogue
      • WebCT or other course-related material
    • Academic (external sources)
      • Electronic book collections e.g. ebrary, sciencedirect
      • Journal articles and conference papers e.g. specialised databases
    • Trade/technical/support (external sources)
      • Web pages, manuals, blogs e.g. focused use of search engines
  • 6. Reliability of information
    • Important to use reliable information and sources in academic work
    • Reliability and accuracy generally achieved through checking of output by others
      • editing/control within book publishing
      • refereeing process, known as peer review , for papers published in journals
      • different types of papers published in journals – Review articles are extremely useful to start off with
  • 7. Looking for information
    • Step 1: Use books to get started - the library catalogue
      • Initial reading
      • Point to other useful references (at end of chapter, or book)
      • Help with identifying keywords and areas of interest
    • Step 2: Go further and use academic databases (must do to get a good mark!)
      • Find research articles published on your topic
    • Step 3: Web sources, but evaluate them!
    • Mix it up: Can start with Step 3 provided you appreciate that you’ll need to carefully evaluate what you find. Don’t miss out other steps!
  • 8. Literature searching
    • Describe recent trends in …
    • Write a 5,000 word essay on …
    • Discuss the development of government policy on …
    • Summarise the issues involved in …
  • 9. Finding information to support your course work - BOOKS
  • 10. Library catalogue/OPAC
    • Library guide available for more detailed information
    • Simple records
      • Title of books (not chapters in books)
      • Title of journals (not papers in journals)
      • Where they are held
      • Status of loan
    • Act smart – use keywords
  • 11.  
  • 12.  
  • 13.  
  • 14. Login for extra services – use your computer username and password …
  • 15. Quick Search only useful if you know exactly what you are looking e.g. have all details from a reading list …
  • 16.
    • Title: The human contribution: unsafe acts, accidents and heroic recoveries
    • Author: Reason, J.T.
    • Year of publication: 2008
    • Publisher: Ashgate
  • 17.  
  • 18. One match. 5/1 - we have 5 copies and 1 is out on loan
  • 19. Shelfmark is important. New feature – links to Google Books (for some items)
  • 20. Some publishers provide access to full text sections of the book (but not in this example!)
  • 21. An example where some access has been provided. Not in your subject area …
  • 22.  
  • 23.  
  • 24. Lots of copies but different loan periods…
  • 25. When looking for information on a topic use Advanced Keyword Search instead …
  • 26.  
  • 27. Adding more keywords results in fewer hits
  • 28. Our electronic books are not assigned to any particular library…
  • 29.  
  • 30.  
  • 31.  
  • 32.  
  • 33. When working at a distance, or tight for time, limiting results to electronic copies can be useful… … but not everything is available in electronic format
  • 34.  
  • 35.  
  • 36.  
  • 37. Catalogue contains entries for the e-books that we have in a collection called ebrary and ScienceDirect. To restrict your catalogue search to these e-books Limit search to Electronic Books BUT – Can do more powerful and effective searches from ebrary website and from the ScienceDirect website than in catalogue
  • 38. Really useful electronic books in our collections
    • Ebrary
      • 40,000+ items
      • Lots of different publishers
    • ScienceDirect at www.sciencedirect.com
      • Much smaller book collection
        • Reference type books (encyclopedia)
        • textbooks and monographs (research type books)
        • From only one publisher (Elsevier)
  • 39.  
  • 40.  
  • 41.  
  • 42. Books – secondary sources
    • Books –
      • Good for overview reading
      • Summarise information pulled from lots of different primary sources
      • Use the citations/references provided in the Further Reading or References sections of chapters to read beyond a topic, or get more detail on a topic
    • Papers/Articles in Journals – primary sources
  • 43. Finding information to support your course work - JOURNAL references on your reading list
  • 44. Do we have this reference? How do I find it on the library catalogue?
    • Yule, S., R. Flin, S. Paterson-Brown, and N. Maran. (2006). Non-technical skills for surgeons in the operating room: A review of the literature, Surgery 139 (2), 140-149
  • 45.
    • Yule, S., R. Flin, S. Paterson-Brown, and N. Maran 2006
    • Non-technical skills for surgeons in the operating room: A review of the literature
    • Surgery
    • 139 (2), 140-149
    Article title Authors Journal title Volume Issue Year Pages
  • 46. Library catalogue/OPAC
    • Fact sheet available for more detailed information
    • Simple records
      • Title of books (not chapters in books)
      • Title of journals (not papers in journals)
      • Where they are held
      • Status of loan
    • Act smart – use keywords
    Only the title of journals NOT the papers/articles in the journals …
  • 47.  
  • 48. Sort your results alphabetically by title -we have separate records for a title in paper format and the same title in electronic format …
  • 49.  
  • 50. Record for an electronic journal: holdings difficult to decipher - use the SFX button to check holdings …
  • 51. Look at the holdings/availability information provided in grey under each supplier. Select the supplier and click on GO …
  • 52. Now on home page for the journal. Need to get to the year/volume/issue/pages that are given in your reference …
  • 53.
    • Yule, S., R. Flin, S. Paterson-Brown, and N. Maran 2006
    • Non-technical skills for surgeons in the operating room: A review of the literature
    • Surgery
    • 139 (2), 140-149
    Article title Authors Journal title Volume Issue Year Pages
  • 54.  
  • 55.  
  • 56. Citing through the text - acknowledging the work/ideas as published by others…
  • 57. List of references (or bibliography) given at the end. Vancouver system = numbered system…
  • 58. Sometimes we hold paper format and electronic format (but check the time span for each by going into the library record – they may be different) …
  • 59. Paper copy of the journal: Important info is shelfmark and holding …
  • 60. Finding information to support your course work – what research has been published on my topic?
  • 61.
    • Report on current research
    • More up-to-date than books
    • Specialised subject coverage
    • Academic content – has been checked
    • Essential for research purposes
  • 62.
    • Worldwide 25,000+ academic journals across all disciplines
    • Approximately 2,500,000 refereed research articles published every year
    • Research papers / journal articles are NOT listed in our library catalogue
    • How do you find out about them?
  • 63. Beyond the catalogue
    • Catalogue – what we hold, limited indexing
    • Database – what has been published (within limitations!), better indexing
      • Bibliographic/abstract e.g. Web of Science , Scopus, Medline
      • Full text (primarily journal articles) e.g. ScienceDirect
      • Web – as compiled by anyone who can create a web page. May not be academic or scholarly
  • 64. Types of databases
    • Bibliographic/abstract databases
      • wide date range
      • publications from many countries
      • publications from many publishers
      • good for comprehensive subject search e.g. Scopus, Web of Science, Medline
      • Use SFX to link to full text or the catalogue
    • Full text databases
      • limited date range (e.g. 1995- , 1998-)
      • publications from one publisher at a time eg Elsevier (ScienceDirect), Wiley (Interscience)
      • good for quick access to full papers
  • 65. Important databases
    • A number of databases may be of use to you in the future:
      • Scopus (biggest science, technical and medical database. Nice search features)
      • PsycINFO and PsycARTICLES (specialised psychology databases)
      • Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL (specialised medical databases. Often have powerful search features. Instruction in December from Mel Bickerton)
      • Web of Science (large, broad science database)
      • Use MetaLib to identify other relevant databases
  • 66. Planning your search
    • Consider
      • time
      • spelling
      • alternatives/synonyms
      • truncation
    • Think about the relationship between the words - Boolean operators (and/or)
  • 67. Hypothetical essay/project title Techniques used in the reduction of medication errors
  • 68. Essay/Project title: Techniques used in the reduction of medication errors OR AN D concepts alternative keywords Idea 1 medication error* prescription error* Idea 2 colour coding color coding checklist* Idea 3
  • 69. Boolean searching
    • Linking of words, phrases and concepts for searching in databases and the Web
    • OR and AND are main operators
    checklist AND medication error checklist OR colour coding
  • 70. Boolean searching
    • OR Broadens the search
    • Use alternative words
    • AND Narrows the search
    • More specific
    • NOT Cuts out unwanted terms
    • Use with care!!
  • 71. Suggested approach, for now…
    • Use biggest and most comprehensive databases first and see what you get
    • Then move off into smaller or more specialised databases if you feel it is necessary
    • Use Scopus or Web of Science
    • Use MetaLib to help identify these
  • 72. database
    • www.scopus.com
    • Biggest science database
    • Contains information on research back to 1826
    • Mainly research papers (journal articles)
      • 38+ million items
      • From 18,000+ journals
    • Links to full text where we have paid for it
    • Use on and off campus (need to use your computer username and password to login)
  • 73. Scopus Search Rules
    • Boolean operators: or and
    • Not case sensitive
    • Truncation symbol: *
    • Automatic stemming picks up singular/plural
    • Exact phrase search in double quotes
    • “ patient safety”
    • Cannot use * in exact phrase search
  • 74. Tips on searching
    • DO
    • Plan your search terms and write them down
    • Try a “quick and dirty” search in your database
    • Search across more than one database
    • DON’T
    • Type in the title of your project word-for- word – likely to get zero
    • Rely on a “quick and dirty” search for the best results
    • Limit your search to just one database
  • 75. Don’t type in the title of your assignment …
  • 76. This database has 38+ million references and found zero results. Q: Why? A: No match for the exact terms you used. Need to think about alternative words and structure the ideas/concepts
  • 77. “ Quick and dirty” search. Two separate ideas. Using only minimal aspects of the search rules …
  • 78. Small number of hits. there is material here that may be useful. Now just need to improve the search terms…
  • 79. Improve your searching
    • Planning is important
      • time
      • spelling
      • alternatives/synonyms
      • truncation
    • Think about the relationship between the words - Boolean operators (and/or)
    • Refine your search - use different words or different combinations of words
  • 80. Essay/Project title: Techniques used in the reduction of medication errors OR AN D concepts alternative keywords Idea 1 medication error* prescription error* Idea 2 colour coding color coding checklist* Idea 3
  • 81.  
  • 82.  
  • 83.  
  • 84.  
  • 85.  
  • 86.  
  • 87.  
  • 88.  
  • 89.  
  • 90.  
  • 91. When off campus you may need to prove that you are entitled to access the resource. Look for Shibboleth/Institution Login …
  • 92. Select UK Federation (no matter where you are, geographically). Then select University of Aberdeen (under U, not A)…
  • 93. Type in your University computer username and password in the Authentication pop-up window…
  • 94. Wait a few seconds for the system to recognise that you should be allowed in…
  • 95. Once you are into the site there is normally some indicator that it has recognised that you are an authenticated user…
  • 96. If not already at the article you wanted you’ll need to navigate to it - use year, volume number, issue number…
  • 97. Can read this on screen, print off or download for your own research/study purposes…
  • 98. Refining your search: add extra keywords …
  • 99. Refining your search: use options presented by database. Document Type , Subject Area …
  • 100.  
  • 101. No link to full text – use SFX to find out if it is available in paper format in the library
  • 102. SFX pop-up: no link for full text, but there is a link to library catalogue. Click on GO
  • 103.  
  • 104. Only material older than 7 years available to us at University of Aberdeen. We don’t hold paper copy (no entry in the library catalogue).
  • 105. Another negative result – title not held at all
  • 106. Example of a more positive result where item is held in paper format
  • 107. Check the Summary Holding field and Shelfmark. It is impossible for us to subscribe to (= pay for) an electronic version of every journal that is published. Sometimes you have to come into the library ….
  • 108. Cited By information (for slightly older material) allows you to jump forwards in time from when that paper was published…
  • 109. They probably don’t share the keywords used in the search but as they cited a paper that was of interest they may also be of interest...
  • 110. Mark relevant items. Can output to email/print/reference software. Can create a simple formatted bibliography of the marked references …
  • 111.  
  • 112.  
  • 113. If results are not useful, look at how you got there (search history) and then start a new/different/better search …
  • 114.  
  • 115. Suggested approach…
    • Use biggest and most comprehensive databases first and see what you get
    • Then move off into smaller or more specialised databases if you feel it is necessary
    • Use Scopus or Web of Science
    • Use MetaLib to help identify these
  • 116.  
  • 117. Printed and electronic library guides available on how to use MetaLib …
  • 118.  
  • 119. As you carry out your database search…
    • Decide on the items that are relevant to you (title, abstract, date)
    • Do we have them?
      • Use Full text icon if available. Use SFX button to check for our paper holdings. (Not everything is available electronically!!)
      • If it isn’t available will the abstract give you enough information?
      • Read and use them in support of your assignment. Do not plagiarise the work – always acknowledge your source.
  • 120. Why use databases?
    • Contain academic and scholarly material
    • Results of refereed research from institutions worldwide
    • Content is authoritative
    • Referring to published research literature demonstrates that you have an interest in the topic
    • Essential to postgraduate studies
  • 121. Search engine results
    • Useful for government related and “grey” type literature
    • Use advanced search features to refine searches
    • Be careful what you use - anyone can post material
    • Evaluate content –author, date, URL, bias
  • 122.  
  • 123.  
  • 124. Was doing an AND search (all these words)
  • 125. Modify it – phrase search, OR search
  • 126.  
  • 127. Can limit results to particular domains (useful for .ac.uk, .edu, .gov.uk materials)…
  • 128.  
  • 129.  
  • 130. Not material that would be found in academic/scholarly database (peer reviewed journal/research articles). Would have to evaluate it...
  • 131. Going back to an earlier Google search and applying it to Google Scholar …
  • 132. Google Scholar (beta test for several years!) applies filters to the results: tries to present academic and scholarly type hits …
  • 133. Provided you’ve set up your preferences correctly you can get FullText@Aberdeen options (=SFX menu)…
  • 134.  
  • 135. Why use databases?
    • Contain academic and scholarly material from across the world – refereed research
    • Content is authoritative
    • Referring to published research literature demonstrates that you have an interest in the topic
    • Easier to evaluate results from databases (date of publication, number of times cited, type of document) than in Google
  • 136.
    • Not a substitute for academic databases
    • But useful support –documents not included in databases e.g. reports, theses, “grey” literature
    • Still in beta test – may get into a mini-loop trying to find full text
    • We do not hold everything in electronic format – sometimes you have to come to Library and use real books and real journals!
  • 137. Excellent tutorials exist to brush up your internet searching skills
  • 138. Get organised!
    • Bibliography - don’t leave this until last!
      • keep notes on each of your readings, or
      • compile a Word table, or
      • create a reference database (on Access?) or
      • use index cards or
      • use RefWorks (www.refworks.com/refworks)
    • Plagiarism = copying = cheating
    • Keep backing up your work
      • H drive, memory sticks ….
  • 139. Citing and bibliographies
    • recognise and acknowledge the work of others
    • demonstrate the body of knowledge on which you have based your work
    • allow readers/researchers to trace your sources and lead them to further information
  • 140. www.refworks.com
  • 141.  
  • 142.  
  • 143.  
  • 144.  
  • 145. When off campus …
    • Can access most library electronic resources using your University computer username and password (learn these!)
      • Shibboleth/Institution Login/UK Access Management Federation
    • For some services (just a few) you may need to change settings on your PC
      • Some full text journals may need you to change proxy settings (www.abdn.ac.uk/proxy)
      • May need to install utilities e.g. RefWorks Write-N-Cite
      • May need to allow pop-ups
  • 146. Essay/Project Identify sources Prepare search string/strategy (keywords, truncation and Boolean) Databases Catalogue Go direct to database or use MetaLib to identify relevant sources. Apply correct search rules. Carry out search. Modify and refine. Evaluate results. Use SFX to link to full text or catalogue to check paper holdings. Print, save or send to email account. Use RefWorks to hold references and create bibliography Web Search engine (e.g. Google Scholar or Google or portal (http://www.intute.ac.uk) or direct to site. Access and read papers. Prepare work. Check Boolean and truncation. Carry out search, modify as necessary Obtain items
  • 147. Need help?
    • Library workshops e.g. using databases and “Taster on Two” introductions
      • Must book for these sessions
    • Vodcasts and podcasts on library web pages
    • More instruction in December with Mel Bickerton
      • Builds on today’s session – more powerful databases
    • Updates on stuff – follow us (aberdeenunilib) on Twitter
  • 148.  
  • 149.  
  • 150. Susan McCourt QML Floor 2, x3287 [email_address]
  • 151.  
  • 152.  
  • 153. Slide handout – 09/10
    • 1,4-7,10,38,42,63-66,68-74,119-121,136,138,139,145,147