H   zard C    mmunicationII Training<br />Susan Aman<br />Safety Office<br />November 2010<br />
HAZCOM Program<br />aka the Right to Know Program elements:<br />Written Hazard Communication Program<br />Training<br />I...
HAZCOM Training Objectives<br />By the end of the course, you will be able to:<br />Explain HAZCOM training requirements<b...
What You Need To Know<br />Askthe Following Questions:<br /><ul><li>How can this material hurt me?
What can I do to protect myself?
Where can I find the answers to the</li></ul>    first two questions?<br />
Labeling<br />What Must Be Labeled?<br /><ul><li>Labels must appear either on
the container itself
the batch ticket
placard, or
process sheets
Exception to Rule: hazardous chemicals in portable containers which are for the immediate use of the employee who performs...
Sample Label<br />Rx Company Isopropyl Alcohol<br />Flammable – Keep away from fire and flame.<br />Warning – For external...
Labeling<br />
Label Review<br />Where are two places you can find information about hazards in your workplace?<br />Hazard classes on la...
Review<br />Isopropyl Alcohol<br />Flammable – Keep away from fire and flame.<br />Warning – For external use only. If tak...
Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)<br />    MSDSs are printed material which provide detailed health and safety informatio...
What info is on an MSDS?<br /><ul><li> Identity of the chemical (name of product)
 Physical hazards
 Health hazards
 Routes of entry into body
 Permissible exposure limits (PELs)
 Carcinogenic factors (cancer-causing)
 Safe handling procedures
 Date
 Control measures (i.e. gloves, goggles)
 First aid
 Contact info</li></li></ul><li>When do you use an MSDS?<br />
MSDS Review<br />Name 3 pieces of info listed on an MSDS .<br />T or F.   Material Safety Data Sheets are NOT available fo...
Two Classes of Hazards<br />
Physical Hazards<br />Physical Hazard Terms<br />Combustible -ignites over 100 degrees F<br />Flammables –ignites below 10...
Physical Hazard  Symbols – Fire Symbol<br />Flammables<br />Combustibles<br />Pyrophoric<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Physical Hazard Symbols – Explosive Symbol<br />Explosives release a tremendous amount of energy in form of heat, light, e...
Physical Hazard Symbols – <br />Flaming “O” Symbol<br />Oxidizers<br />Organic peroxides<br />
Physical Hazard Symbols – <br />Cylinder Symbol<br />Gas cylinders<br />
Health Hazards<br />Health Hazard Terms<br />Corrosive - material that burns body tissue<br />Toxin –material with the pot...
Health Hazard Terms<br />Health Hazard Terms<br />Dose - amount of material an individual is  exposed to <br />Dose Effect...
Chronic effects:  effects which take years or decades to occur after you are exposuredmany times</li></li></ul><li>Health ...
Health Hazard  Terms – <br />
Health Hazard Symbols – <br />Medical Symbol<br />
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Hazard Communication- LinkedIn

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Every employee has the right to know what chemicals and hazards they work with every day. This training provides workers and supervisors and management with a basic understanding of OSHA's Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) requirements for every workplace: a written HAZCOM program, training, inventory, material safety data sheets, and labels.

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  • You as employers and employees have the right to know about work hazards and how to protect yourself so that the incidence of illness and injury from hazardous chemicals is reduced. This right to know rule has a “downstream flow of information” which means that producers of chemicals have primary responsibility for generating and disseminating info, AND users of chemicals must obtain that information and transmit it to their employees.The OSHA Hazard Communication Standard is composed of five key elements. These five key elements are:     1.  Materials Inventory - A list of the hazardous materials present in your work area. 2.  Material Safety Data Sheets - A detailed description of each hazardous material listed in the Materials Inventory. 3.  Labeling - Containers of hazardous materials must have labels which identify the material and warn of its potential hazard to employees. 4.  Training - All employees must be trained to identify and work safely with hazardous materials. 5.  Written Program - A written program must be developed which ties all of the above together.There are two places you can find information about chemical hazards in your workplace:--labels on containers--MSDS binderHazardous chemical: any chemical which is a physical or health hazard.
  • Outline for today’s training
  • Hazardous materials (chemical products) are everywhere. It has been estimated that over a half million chemical products are used by business and industry every year. Some of these chemical products pose little danger to you, while others are deadly. Modern manufacturing would not be possible without chemicals. However, like machinery or electrical equipment, you must know how to use chemicals safely. The first step in using chemicals safely is to recognize those materials that may be hazardous to your health or physical safety.WHERE do you find the information you need? Your most immediate source for information can be found on labels attached to containers which hold various hazardous materials. Your second source of information is Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs). Material Safety Data Sheets will be discussed in the next section.
  • Your most immediate source for information can be found on labels attached to containers which hold various hazardous materials. Q: What Must Be Labeled? The OSHA Hazard Communication Standard requires that ALL hazardous materials be labeled. Labels must appear either on the container itself, the batch ticket, placard, or the process sheets. Hazardous chemicals in portable containers which are for the immediate use of the employee who performs the transfer is the exception to this rule. Your second source of information is Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs). Material Safety Data Sheets will be discussed in the next section.
  • 29 CFR 1910.1200 Chemical manufacturers and importers must convey hazard info to downstream employers through labels on containers and MSDS.
  • As you read labels, you will see key words which signal you that you should take extra care when handling a particular hazardous material. These key words include:   CAUTIONMODERATE RISKWARNINGDANGERSERIOUS RISKMAJOR RISK For example, the key word &quot;DANGER&quot; means: 1. Protective equipment and/or clothing is required before use; 2. Misuse can result in immediate harm, long term effects, or death; and 3. The chemical may be toxic, corrosive, or flammable. In addition to commercial labels, many organizations use labels such as those shown below. Or, your organization may use a specially designed label which contains the same information. Contact your supervisor for more information about the labels used by your organization. Each colored bar or small diamond represents a different class of hazard. The hazard classes found on labels include Health, Flammability, Reactivity, and in some cases, Special Hazards. Each hazard class uses a different color and a rating scale from 0 - 4.
  • As you read labels, you will see key words which signal you that you should take extra care when handling a particular hazardous material. These key words include:   CAUTIONMODERATE RISKWARNINGDANGERSERIOUS RISKMAJOR RISK For example, the key word &quot;DANGER&quot; means: 1. Protective equipment and/or clothing is required before use; 2. Misuse can result in immediate harm, long term effects, or death; and 3. The chemical may be toxic, corrosive, or flammable. In addition to commercial labels, many organizations use labels such as those shown below. Or, your organization may use a specially designed label which contains the same information. Contact your supervisor for more information about the labels used by your organization. Each colored bar or small diamond represents a different class of hazard. The hazard classes found on labels include Health, Flammability, Reactivity, and in some cases, Special Hazards. Each hazard class uses a different color and a rating scale from 0 - 4.
  • The hazard warning can be any type of message, picture, symbol that provides info on the hazards of the chemical and targeted organs affected. Must be in English and easy to understand.
  • Where are two places you can find information about hazards in your workplace? Labels, MSDSHazard classes on labels are represented by c) colorsT or F: Only very hazardous material must be labeled. FalseT or F: The higher the number on a rating scale, the less dangerous the substance. FalseDoes the following label contain all of the required information for a commercial label? NOWhat’s missing? Company address
  • Answer: No. Q: What’s missing? A: Company address is missing.
  • Your second source of information is Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs). Material Safety Data Sheets will be discussed in the next section. Chemical manufacturers and importers must develop an MSDS for each hazardous chemical they produce or import, and must provide the MSDS at time of initial shipment to downstream distributor or user. Distributors also must ensure that downstream employers are similarly provided an MSDS.MSDS must be updated within 3 months of learning of “new or significant info” regarding chemical’s hazard potential.OSHA does not require that MSDS be provided to purchasers of household consumer products (i.e. Windex or White-Out) when the products are used in workplace in same manner that consumer would use them (i.e. when during and frequency of use (and therefore exposure) is not greater than what typical consumer would experience.-=-=-=-=-=While labels are an effective way to display information about hazardous materials, there will be times when you will want more information than can be included on a label.You can find additional information about the hazardous materials you work with in what is called a Material Safety Data Sheet, or MSDS for short. You should take time to read and understand the MSDSs describing the hazardous materials present in your work area.
  • SAS – YACLee CDCStony CDCMaterial Safety Data Sheets are available for ALL of the hazardous materials present in your work area.WHEN do you use an MSDS?You should use an MSDS whenever you need additional information about a hazardous material that is not included on the product label. For example, you have spilled bleach on the floor, and you need to know how to clean it up safely. You need only refer to the &quot;Safe-Handling Procedures&quot; section of the bleach MSDS.Some chemicals, such as sodium hydroxide, are very dangerous. If you have an accident, you may not have time to look up the information you need in an MSDS. You should read the MSDSs for the hazardous materials present in your work area before you work with them.Ask your supervisor or manager where MSDSs are located. Take time to read the MSDSs which describe the hazardous materials present in your work area. Remember, knowing where MSDSs are located and how to use them is your responsibility; it is part of your job.
  • Name 3 pieces of information listed on an MSDS.T or F. Material Safety Data Sheets are NOT available for all hazardous materials present in your work area. FalseT or F. You should use an MSDS whenever you need additional info about a hazardous material that is not included on the product label. TrueWhose responsibility is it to know where the MSDS is located? Everyone’s
  • Physical Hazards are one of two major classes of hazardous materials covered by the OSHA Communication Standard. The other major hazard class is Health Hazards. In this session, we will be looking at various types of physical hazards and what you need to know to use these materials safely. To help you identify materials which are physical hazards, the symbols shown below are often used. Chemicals not covered by the HAZCOM rule: Foodfood additivesDrugsCosmeticsalcohol or winepesticides
  • In this session, we will be looking at various types of physical hazards and what you need to know to use these materials safely. To help you identify materials which are physical hazards, the symbols shown below are often used. Very simply, physical hazards are hazards which threathen your physical safety.=-=-=-=-Physical hazards of chemicals in work area:Hazard Terms:Flammables-Materials that easily ignite or burn rapidly or intensely such as: Acetone, Methanol, Gasoline, Xylene.Explosives-Materials that violently release large quantities of gas and heat. Many explosions result in fires. Explosion hazards and flammable hazards are frequently considered together.Pressure can also be developed in a closed container due to decomposition or reaction of the content. An example of a pressure hazard is broken valve on a compressed gas cylinder. Escaping gas can propel a cylinder like a rocket. Toxicity-A substance with the potential of injury by direct chemical action with body systems. Toxic substances interfere with the function of cells in body tissues. Unstable – or reactive;tends to decompose during normal handling and storage . chemical which will vigorously polymerize, decompose, condense, or will become self-reactive under conditions of shocks or pressure or temperature
  • There are three classes of materials which use the fire symbol. Flammables can be gases, liquids or solids. Flammables ignite easily and burn rapidly. Liquid flammables have a flashpoint under 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Combustibles are similar to flammables, but they do not ignite as easily. Liquid combustibles have a flash point above 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Pyrophoric, or spontaneous combustion materials, burst into flames &quot;on their own&quot; at temperatures below 130 degrees Fahrenheit.do not expose these materials to sparks, flames or other heat sources. You must also not smoke or light a match or flame near them.
  • 1. Explosives are materials which release a tremendous amount of energy in the form of heat, light and expanding pressure within a very short period of time.  2. Water Reactivesreact with water and may explode, or they may release a gas which is flammable. 3. Unstable Reactivesare chemicals that can react or can become self-reactive when subjected to shock, pressure or temperature.Whenever you work with a material that uses the explosive symbol, be sure to read the warning label or the MSDS for safe handling procedures. Because materials that use the explosive symbol are often very dangerous to work with, you may need additional training or instructions from your supervisor. Always check with your supervisor before handling or using materials that use the explosive symbol.
  • 1. Oxidizers cause other substances to burn more easily through a chemical reaction or change. 2. Organic Peroxides contain oxygen and act as powerful oxidizers.Great care should be taken when you handle gas cylinders to insure that they are not damaged when they are moved or used. In addition, you should read the warning label and the MSDS for safe handling procedures concerning the gas contained in a gas cylinder.
  • Many gases such as nitrogen, oxygen, and acetylene are used in the manufacturing process. In order to transport, store and use these gases, they are &quot;bottled&quot; under great pressure in tanks called gas cylinders.Gas cylinders
  • Corrosives- Materials that burn body tissues, such as Hydrochloric Acid, Sodium Hypochlorite (bleach), Nitric Acid, Sulfuric Acid.Toxin-The term toxicity is used to describe the ability of a substance to cause a harmful effect. Inhalation is MOST COMMON route of entry.EVERYTHING is toxic at some dose. Even water! If someone drinks too much water at any one time, it can cause death.Routes of Entry
  • There is a balance between toxicity and dose. Dose is the AMOUNT of something you are exposed to, or come in contact with. The dose effects are dependent on the concentration of the material that gets into the body over a period of time, or concentration x time.Hazard Potentialis the likelihood that a specific chemical or substance (toxic material) will cause an ill effect at a given dose. The following screens will help you to understand the relationship between toxicity, dose, and hazard potential. Acute Health Hazards are those whose effects occur immediately or soon after you come in contact with them. For example, you accidentally spill a strong acid on your hand. The acid will begin to burn your hand immediately. Or, you begin to work with a paint solvent in a closed area, and the fumes make you feel dizzy. The response depends on the dose and the effects on the body. This may lead to irritation, illness or death. occur rapidly as a result of short-term exposures, and are of short duration is an acute effect. occur as a result of long-term exposure, and are of long duration is a chronic effect.The following products are exempt from the act:-Hazardous Waste-Tobacco or tobacco productsWood or wood productsFoods, drugs or cosmeticsRetail food saleConsumer Products (This applies to chemicals purchased at a consumer store. However, if these products are used in the work environment, they must have a MSDS. For example, bleach purchased at a grocery store will not require a MSDS. But if you use this product in the workplace, the standard applies.)
  • Acute Health Hazardsare those whose effects occur immediately or soon after you come in contact with them. For example, you accidentally spill a strong acid on your hand. The acid will begin to burn your hand immediately. Or, you begin to work with a paint solvent in a closed area, and the fumes make you feel dizzy while you’re painting.
  • Chronic Health Hazards, on the other hand, are those whose effects take years or decades to occur after many exposures. An example of a chronic health hazard would be asbestos. The dangerous effects for people who have been overexposed to asbestos take years to appear and have been linked to a number of fatal lung diseases.
  • Health Hazards: One of two major classes of hazardous materials covered by the Hazard Communication Standard. They are substances which threaten your health.The Medical symbol is a general symbol used to identify materials which are health hazards.
  • The Skull and Crossbones is a symbol that has been used for centuries. Today it is used to identify hazardous materials which are poisonous.
  • This symbol is used to identify materials which are Corrosives. Corrosives cause tissue damage and burns on contact with skin or eyes.
  • T or F. Liquid flammables ignite more easily than do liquid combustibles. TrueWhich of the following material classes should NOT use an Explosive symbol? b) Flammables T or F. The gas in a gas cylinder is stored under great pressure. TrueT or F. Dose is the only factor that determines how a substance might affect your health. FalseT or F. Inhalation is the most common type of route of exposure. True
  • You notice a strange odor when working with a new chemical. What section of the MSDS will provide information about odor?Section III- Physical PropertiesYou develop a skin rash while working with a chemical. What section of the MSDS will tell you about the affects of overexposure?Section V- Health HazardsWhat section describes safe work practices for chemical products?Section VIII- Special Handling Information. This section lists personal protective equipment, ventilation requirements and other safe work practices.
  • Hazard Communication- LinkedIn

    1. 1. H zard C mmunicationII Training<br />Susan Aman<br />Safety Office<br />November 2010<br />
    2. 2. HAZCOM Program<br />aka the Right to Know Program elements:<br />Written Hazard Communication Program<br />Training<br />Inventory<br />Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs)<br />Labeling<br />
    3. 3. HAZCOM Training Objectives<br />By the end of the course, you will be able to:<br />Explain HAZCOM training requirements<br />Explain details of a HAZCOM Program<br />Identify ways chemicals affect your body, <br />Identify hazardous chemicals in your work area and ways to protect yourself (i.e. personal protective equipment)<br />Define a material safety data sheet (MSDS) and where it is located in your work area<br />Explain labeling<br />
    4. 4. What You Need To Know<br />Askthe Following Questions:<br /><ul><li>How can this material hurt me?
    5. 5. What can I do to protect myself?
    6. 6. Where can I find the answers to the</li></ul> first two questions?<br />
    7. 7. Labeling<br />What Must Be Labeled?<br /><ul><li>Labels must appear either on
    8. 8. the container itself
    9. 9. the batch ticket
    10. 10. placard, or
    11. 11. process sheets
    12. 12. Exception to Rule: hazardous chemicals in portable containers which are for the immediate use of the employee who performs the transfer</li></li></ul><li>Labeling<br />OSHA requires following on be included on ALL labels:   <br />The product name;<br />A warning statement, message or symbol; and <br />On commercial labels, manufacturers of hazardous materials must include their name and address. Many manufacturers also include a statement describing safe handling procedures.<br />
    13. 13. Sample Label<br />Rx Company Isopropyl Alcohol<br />Flammable – Keep away from fire and flame.<br />Warning – For external use only. If taken internally, serious gastric disturbances will results. In case of accidental ingestion, call physician immediately.<br />Rx Co, 123 Main St, Anytown, NY 12345<br />
    14. 14. Labeling<br />
    15. 15.
    16. 16. Label Review<br />Where are two places you can find information about hazards in your workplace?<br />Hazard classes on labels are represented by a) numbers<br /> b) letters<br /> c) colors<br />T or F: Only very hazardous material must be labeled. <br />T or F: The higher the number on a rating scale, the less dangerous the substance.<br />Does the following label contain all of the required information for a commercial label?<br />
    17. 17. Review<br />Isopropyl Alcohol<br />Flammable – Keep away from fire and flame.<br />Warning – For external use only. If taken internally, serious gastric disturbances will result. In case of accidental ingestion, call physician immediately. <br />
    18. 18. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)<br /> MSDSs are printed material which provide detailed health and safety informationand precautions for handling hazardous substances, including emergency and first aid procedures.<br />
    19. 19. What info is on an MSDS?<br /><ul><li> Identity of the chemical (name of product)
    20. 20. Physical hazards
    21. 21. Health hazards
    22. 22. Routes of entry into body
    23. 23. Permissible exposure limits (PELs)
    24. 24. Carcinogenic factors (cancer-causing)
    25. 25. Safe handling procedures
    26. 26. Date
    27. 27. Control measures (i.e. gloves, goggles)
    28. 28. First aid
    29. 29. Contact info</li></li></ul><li>When do you use an MSDS?<br />
    30. 30. MSDS Review<br />Name 3 pieces of info listed on an MSDS .<br />T or F. Material Safety Data Sheets are NOT available for all hazardous materials present in your work area. <br />T or F. You should use an MSDS whenever you need additional info about a hazardous material that is not included on the product label.<br />Whose responsibility is it to know where the MSDS is located? <br />
    31. 31. Two Classes of Hazards<br />
    32. 32. Physical Hazards<br />Physical Hazard Terms<br />Combustible -ignites over 100 degrees F<br />Flammables –ignites below 100 degrees F<br />Flash point – ignition temperature<br />Explosives <br />Pressure<br />Unstable<br />
    33. 33. Physical Hazard Symbols – Fire Symbol<br />Flammables<br />Combustibles<br />Pyrophoric<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1i55ixRedo&feature=related<br />
    34. 34. Physical Hazard Symbols – Explosive Symbol<br />Explosives release a tremendous amount of energy in form of heat, light, expanding pressure<br />Water reactives<br />Unstable reactives<br />
    35. 35. Physical Hazard Symbols – <br />Flaming “O” Symbol<br />Oxidizers<br />Organic peroxides<br />
    36. 36. Physical Hazard Symbols – <br />Cylinder Symbol<br />Gas cylinders<br />
    37. 37. Health Hazards<br />Health Hazard Terms<br />Corrosive - material that burns body tissue<br />Toxin –material with the potential to injure body systems by chemical reaction<br />Routes of Entry<br />Ways chemicals may enter the body:<br />Inhalation (breathing)<br />Ingestion (swallowing)<br />Absorption (skin contact)<br />Injection<br />
    38. 38. Health Hazard Terms<br />Health Hazard Terms<br />Dose - amount of material an individual is exposed to <br />Dose Effects– 2 kinds; depends on the concentration of material over a period of time:<br /><ul><li>Acute effects: effects which occur immediately or soon after you come in contact with them
    39. 39. Chronic effects: effects which take years or decades to occur after you are exposuredmany times</li></li></ul><li>Health Hazard Terms – <br />
    40. 40. Health Hazard Terms – <br />
    41. 41. Health Hazard Symbols – <br />Medical Symbol<br />
    42. 42. Health Hazard Symbols – <br />Skull & Crossbones Symbol<br />Poisonous<br />
    43. 43. Health Hazard Symbols – <br />Corrosive Symbol<br />
    44. 44. Health Hazard Symbols – <br />Radioactive Symbol<br />
    45. 45. Health Hazard Symbols – <br />Biological Symbol<br />
    46. 46. Protective Measures<br /><ul><li>Product Substitution
    47. 47. Engineering Controls
    48. 48. Safe Work Practices
    49. 49. Personal Protective Equipment
    50. 50. Training and Communication
    51. 51. Environmental Monitoring
    52. 52. Personal Monitoring</li></li></ul><li>Review<br />T or F. Liquid flammables ignite more easily than do liquid combustibles. <br />Which of the following material classes should NOT use an Explosive symbol?   a) Explosives <br /> b) Flammables <br /> c) Water Reactives<br /> d) Unstable Reactives<br />T or F. The gas in a gas cylinder is stored under great pressure<br />T or F. Dose is the only factor that determines how a substance might affect your health. <br />T or F. Inhalation is the most common type of route of exposure.<br />What protective measures will insure that safe exposure limits are not exceeded? <br />
    53. 53. Review<br />
    54. 54. Review<br />
    55. 55. Labels are missing!<br />
    56. 56. Labels are missing!<br />
    57. 57. Labels missing!<br />
    58. 58. Review<br />What color indicates fire or explosive hazards?<br />Name a “caution phrase” that may be found on a chemical label. <br />
    59. 59. Summary<br />Consult your supervisor –what chemicals will you be working with? <br />Read all safety instructions and labels<br />Review MSDSs<br />Review labels<br />Wear personal protective equipment<br />Know what to do in an emergency<br />Know storage requirements<br />Understand and obey the safety rules <br />Take safety home with you - the average workplace is safer than the average home!<br />
    60. 60. HAZCOM<br />
    61. 61. Safety OfficeSusan AmanPhone:E-mail:<br />
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