Encouraging a sense of wonder

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Encouraging a sense of wonder

  1. 1. Encouraging Inquiry in the Outdoor Classroom Setting
  2. 2. Our everyday experience of the world around us is an invitation : <ul><li>to question </li></ul><ul><li>and explore </li></ul><ul><li>and wonder. </li></ul>
  3. 3. What is inquiry? <ul><li>Scientific inquiry is a powerful way of understanding science content. </li></ul><ul><li>Students learn how to ask questions, and use evidence to answer them. </li></ul>
  4. 4. How can we facilitate inquiry in outdoor classroom situations? <ul><li>What are some ways in which we can encourage a sense of wonder? </li></ul><ul><li>How can we help kids to ask questions ? </li></ul>
  5. 5. The inquiry process can be broken into three parts. We will focus on predictions, or “questions”.
  6. 6. How can we help with predictions? <ul><li>Young learners may need some support as they begin to “look carefully” and “predict.” </li></ul><ul><li>We can provide this support as we model and encourage scientific language. </li></ul><ul><li>We can prompt, rather than tell. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Ways to prompt: <ul><li>Attention Focusing Prompts : </li></ul><ul><li>What did you notice? </li></ul><ul><li>How would you describe? </li></ul><ul><li>How does it feel/smell/look? </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Counting and Measuring Prompts: </li></ul><ul><li>How many, how often, how long? </li></ul><ul><li>Comparison Prompts: </li></ul><ul><li>How are these similar or different? </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Action/ Problem Posing Prompts: </li></ul><ul><li>What happens if….? </li></ul><ul><li>Can you find a way to…? </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Reasoning Prompts: </li></ul><ul><li>Why do you think? What is your reason? </li></ul><ul><li>What evidence do you have? </li></ul><ul><li>What might have caused? </li></ul><ul><li>How will you know it? </li></ul>
  11. 11. This frosty stripe on a fall morning provided a perfect opportunity for reasoning prompts. “Why do you think the lawn has a frost stripe?” “What is your reason?” “What might have caused it?”
  12. 12. Productive questions encourage inquiry <ul><li>By using prompting, we can promote student action, reasoning and next steps. </li></ul><ul><li>We need to guide students by prompting with questions , rather than telling. </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>Instead of saying “I think a ________ made that track.” </li></ul><ul><li>Use guiding prompts to support student inquiry: </li></ul><ul><li>“What do you notice?” </li></ul><ul><li>“How would you describe?” </li></ul><ul><li>“What might have caused?” </li></ul>
  14. 14. Strategies to Keep in Mind <ul><li>Encourage investigation and exploration </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage “looking closely” to be sure of observations </li></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>Repeat or reword what the child is saying to gain clarity and understanding. </li></ul><ul><li>Co-inquire… let the child know that you have questions too. </li></ul>
  16. 16. <ul><li>When in doubt, stick with the easiest prompt of all: </li></ul><ul><li>“ I wonder…” </li></ul>
  17. 17. <ul><li>Enjoy your time in the outdoor classroom, and thank you for all of your help in encouraging inquiry in young learners. </li></ul>

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