Making Literature Live

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This experiential workshop considers dramatic techniques and games to help students to enjoy literature, to understand more and to develop competent literacy skills. The aim is to offer teachers the tools to lift the text off the page so that it becomes "live" for the students in a meaningful fashion. The kinaesthetic approach, collaborative group work, thematic studies, presentation techniques and interactive learning and teaching will be modelled. By the end of the session the participants should have new ways of approaching literature classes and a number of adaptable practical techniques for classroom use whatever the material or age of the students. The teachers should be able to make literature live for their students.

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  • can you please send me a copy of this? this is very useful..thank you my friend
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  • very cute and inspiring:)
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Making Literature Live

  1. 1. Susan Hillyard B.Ed. (Hons)Susan Hillyard B.Ed. (Hons)Pearson PeruPearson Peru20132013Making Literature LiveMaking Literature Live
  2. 2. Todays Questions:Todays Questions: Do students love reading?Do students love reading? What kinds of reading skills do you teach? What kinds of reading skills do you teach?  What is literature? What is literature?    What is LIVE?What is LIVE? What elements of the Peruvian context doWhat elements of the Peruvian context dowe need to consider?we need to consider? Can we exploit literature as a topic in anCan we exploit literature as a topic in anexam?exam?  
  3. 3. What is literatureWhat is literaturein thein theELTELTclassroom?classroom?
  4. 4. Think time Exercise 1Think time Exercise 1 What kind of literature do you use in yourWhat kind of literature do you use in yourclassrooms?classrooms? Why do you use literature?Why do you use literature? How do you teach it?How do you teach it? What do the students say about it?What do the students say about it?
  5. 5. Sandie’s BlogSandie’s Bloghttp://picturebooksinelt.blogspot.com.ar/http://picturebooksinelt.blogspot.com.ar/
  6. 6. Student NeedsStudent NeedsWe are caught up withWe are caught up withconcrete kids in a wordyconcrete kids in a wordyworldworld ( Anon)( Anon)
  7. 7. Abstract to ConcreteAbstract to ConcreteHow do we make the complex simple?How do we make the complex simple?How do we make the abstract concrete?How do we make the abstract concrete?How do we help young learnersHow do we help young learnersconnect?connect?
  8. 8. Learning and ExperienceLearning and Experiencewritingformal WHOLE LANG informalspeakinglisteningvisitorswalks naturefilms plantsfield tripspictures literatureartefacts animalsEXPERIENCES(Slaughter and Zarry)(Learning to read and writethe whole Lang way)
  9. 9. Group IndividualActive StaticConcrete AbstractPersonal Lang S.Else’s LangUnstructured (time) Structured (time)Ethereal PermanentThinking-Doing Thinking-ReadingMultisensory Written codeRelationCharacterizationPlotSetThemeConflictInterpretationExpressionConnection
  10. 10. IMMERSIONDEMONSTRATIONRESPONSEAPPROXIMATIONUSERESPONSIBILITYEXPECTATION• texts of all kinds• how texts are constructedand used• coercers of behaviour:significant and hold highexpectations• decisions about when, howand what ≠ depowered• use, employ, and practisein functional, realistic,non-artificial ways• feedback response must benon-threatening• mistakes are essential(must be accompanied by)ENGAGEMENTProbability of Engagement isincreased if these conditionsare also optimally present.occurs when learnerisconvinced that:1. I am a ‘doer’.2. Engaging thepurposes of my life.3. Without fear.‘artistic’Cambourne’s ModelCambourne’s Model
  11. 11. A Look at School EnvironmentsA Look at School EnvironmentsTraditional Classrooms• curriculum : part towhole• emphasis on basicskills• fixed curriculum• textbooks andworkbooks• “blank slates” ontowhich information isetched by the teacherConstructivist Classrooms• curriculum: whole to part• emphasis on bigconcepts• pursuit of studentquestions• primary sources of dataand manipulativematerials• thinkers with emergingtheories about the world
  12. 12. • teachers: didactic,disseminate info• teachers seek correctanswers• assessment: separatefrom teaching – testing• students primarily workalone• teachers: interactive,mediate• teachers seek thestudents’ points ofview/approximation• assessment: interwoven-student exhibitions andportfolios.• students primarily workin groups.
  13. 13. }Process + Content respectvaluedAtmosphere supportiveschool rôle modelsclass spiritrecognitionacceptanceof feelingshow to handleEmpathy angeris the conflictbasis of sorrowmoralitySelf esteemcivilisation +healthy bodyquality of sound mindlifeEducation shapes beliefsabout selfTo feel Self fulfilling prophecyTo Identify feelings survival - labellingTo Express(The Board of EducationEast York SchoolsEast York Borough)
  14. 14. New paradigmsNew paradigmsCommonsense AssumptionsCommonsense Assumptions1.1. Learning proceeds from partLearning proceeds from partto whole.to whole.2.2. Lessons should be teacherLessons should be teachercentered because learning iscentered because learning isthe transfer of knowledgethe transfer of knowledgefrom the teacher to thefrom the teacher to thestudent.student.3.3. Lessons should prepareLessons should preparestudents to function instudents to function insociety after schooling.society after schooling.Live Language PrinciplesLive Language Principles1.1. Learning proceeds fromLearning proceeds fromwhole to part.whole to part.2.2. Lessons should be learnerLessons should be learnercentered because learning iscentered because learning isthe active construction ofthe active construction ofknowledge by the student.knowledge by the student.3.3. Lessons should haveLessons should havemeaning and purpose formeaning and purpose forstudents now.students now.
  15. 15. LEARNINGSTYLECHARACTERISTICS EXAMPLES SUPPORTINGCLASSROOMACTIVITIESBODILY/KINESTHETICgood motor control, co-ordinated; good sense oftiming; physically active;relies on gestures andtouchingdancer, athlete,juggler, mechaniccraftsdancedramatactile andmovement gamesINTERPERSONAL aware of, can influence, andcan lead others; sociallyactive; good communicatorand negotiatorpolitician, teacher,counsellor,salespersongroup activitiesdiscussionsdebatessharing andcomparingINTRAPERSONAL strong sense of self; likesworking alone; focuses onown feelings, dreams,interests; intuitive andoriginalnovelist,philosopher,psychologistself-pacedlearningindependentprojectsindividualworkspacepersonalresponsesLINGUISTIC sensitive to language andwords; loves to read, write,and tell stories; goodmemory for names, places,and dateseditor, reporter,writer, poetcreative writingoral readingstorytellingwriting reportsmemorisationLOGICAL/MATHEMATICALgood at reasoning andabstract thought; organisedand precise; a problemsolver; good with numbers;asks logical questionsmathematician,scientist, engineer,lawyermath problemsproblem solvingexperimentscategorisationclassifyingcreating orsolving riddlesSPATIAL visual thinker; goodobserver; imaginative;daydreams; likes to makeand use designs, diagrams,etcchess player,architect, artist,physicistspatial gamespuzzlesmaking maps orchartsart projects
  16. 16. Standing Up the Text andStanding Up the Text andMaking it LIVE!Making it LIVE!**Analysis of texts.Analysis of texts.* Split level story or poetry creation from text.* Split level story or poetry creation from text.* Throwing stories and poems.* Throwing stories and poems.* Character development.* Character development.* Choral poems.* Choral poems.* Improvisation and role play.* Improvisation and role play.* Songs and games.* Songs and games.*Storytelling, Storying and Storyboarding*Storytelling, Storying and Storyboarding* Web 2 Tools for developing creativity* Web 2 Tools for developing creativity
  17. 17. A Thinking StoryA Thinking Story(Learning Styles)(Learning Styles) Listening: notes and reconstructionListening: notes and reconstruction Storyboarding and freeze framingStoryboarding and freeze framing Scene creation and acting outScene creation and acting out
  18. 18. More StrategiesMore Strategies Keeping a reading DiaryKeeping a reading Diary Storytelling Project to peers/to primary/ KGStorytelling Project to peers/to primary/ KG Comic StripsComic Strips Drama conventions like Hotseating/Role on theDrama conventions like Hotseating/Role on thewall/Vox Populi/Freeze Frame/ Carouselwall/Vox Populi/Freeze Frame/ Carousel Doing a musical comedyDoing a musical comedy VideomakingVideomaking
  19. 19. The DiaryThe Diary Read pg 16-21 today. Best bit:Read pg 16-21 today. Best bit: I predict:I predict: Great vocabulary:Great vocabulary: Character graphic organisers.Character graphic organisers. Setting notes/drawingsSetting notes/drawings Comment on illustrations/copy style of picturesComment on illustrations/copy style of pictures Reports/InterviewsReports/Interviews EvaluationEvaluation
  20. 20. REAL QuestionsREAL Questionsin Circle time.in Circle time. Was the book enjoyable for you? Why or whyWas the book enjoyable for you? Why or whynot?not? What were your favourite or least favouriteWhat were your favourite or least favouritemoments?moments? Who were your favourite or least favouriteWho were your favourite or least favouritecharacters?characters? Was the book easy for you to read? Why or whyWas the book easy for you to read? Why or whynot?not? Would you recommend it to your friends? WhyWould you recommend it to your friends? Whyor why not?or why not?
  21. 21.  What did you learn from the book? ForWhat did you learn from the book? Forexample, useful language,example, useful language, factual, cultural,factual, cultural,historical, geographical information, etc.historical, geographical information, etc. Would you like to read another story by theWould you like to read another story by thesame author? Why orsame author? Why or why not?why not? Would you like to find out about the author?Would you like to find out about the author? Would you like to try writing your own book?Would you like to try writing your own book?
  22. 22. Using your Work for Exams:Using your Work for Exams:The interview.The interview. Take in the real book: Show and TellTake in the real book: Show and Tell Talk about the cover/ spine/blurb/yrTalk about the cover/ spine/blurb/yr Show knowledge of author’s/publisher’sShow knowledge of author’s/publisher’s/illustrator’s name/illustrator’s name Author’s biography/ other worksAuthor’s biography/ other works Ask Examiner some real Qs related to realAsk Examiner some real Qs related to realbooks.books.
  23. 23. Animoto: photos into video withAnimoto: photos into video withmusicmusic
  24. 24. An Animoto I made from photosAn Animoto I made from photos
  25. 25. Storybird: Artful storymakingStorybird: Artful storymaking
  26. 26. Voicethread: using photos withVoicethread: using photos withvoice over and collaborationvoice over and collaboration
  27. 27. Wallwisher: multiple notesWallwisher: multiple notes
  28. 28. MyBrainshark: vids from PPTMyBrainshark: vids from PPT
  29. 29. PiclitsPiclits
  30. 30. The Birth of a StoneThe Birth of a StoneIn those deep mountain ravinesIn those deep mountain ravinesI wonder if there are stonesI wonder if there are stonesthat no one has ever visited?that no one has ever visited?I went up to the mountainI went up to the mountainin quest of a stone no one had ever seenin quest of a stone no one had ever seenfrom the remotest of timesfrom the remotest of timesUnder ancient pinesUnder ancient pines
  31. 31. on steep pathless slopeson steep pathless slopesthere was a stonethere was a stoneI wonderI wonderhow longhow longthis stone all thick with mossthis stone all thick with mosshas beenhas beenhere?here?Two thousand years? Two million? TwoTwo thousand years? Two million? Twobillion?billion?
  32. 32. NoNoNot at allNot at allIf really till now no oneIf really till now no onehas ever seen this stonehas ever seen this stoneit is onlyit is onlyhereherefrom now onfrom now onThis stoneThis stonewas only bornwas only bornthe moment I first saw it Kwang –kyu Kimthe moment I first saw it Kwang –kyu Kim
  33. 33. See handoutsSee handouts Animoto, a simple photo into video app with music:Animoto, a simple photo into video app with music:http://animoto.com/http://animoto.com/ Storybird,write your own illustrated storyStorybird,write your own illustrated storyhttp://storybird.com/books/chchch-changes/http://storybird.com/books/chchch-changes/ Voicethread, use photos and voice to make a presentationVoicethread, use photos and voice to make a presentationhttp://voicethread.com/http://voicethread.com/ Wallwisher, a simple collaborative tool:Wallwisher, a simple collaborative tool:http://wallwisher.com/http://wallwisher.com/ Mybrainshark,videopresentations with sound:Mybrainshark,videopresentations with sound:http://www.brainshark.com/mybrainshark.aspxhttp://www.brainshark.com/mybrainshark.aspx Piclits, a drag and drop picture poem maker:Piclits, a drag and drop picture poem maker:http://www.piclits.com/compose_dragdrop.aspxhttp://www.piclits.com/compose_dragdrop.aspx
  34. 34. 4.4. Learning takes place asLearning takes place asindividuals practice skillsindividuals practice skillsand form habits.and form habits.5.5. In a second language, oralIn a second language, orallanguage acquisitionlanguage acquisitionprecedes the development ofprecedes the development ofliteracy.literacy.6.6. Learning should take placeLearning should take placein English to facilitate thein English to facilitate theacquisition of English.acquisition of English.7.7. The learning potential ofThe learning potential ofbilingual students is limited.bilingual students is limited.4.4. Learning takes place asLearning takes place asgroups engage in meaningfulgroups engage in meaningfulsocial interaction.social interaction.5.5. In a second language, oralIn a second language, oraland written language areand written language areacquired simultaneously.acquired simultaneously.6.6. Learning should take placeLearning should take placein the first language to buildin the first language to buildconcepts and facilitate theconcepts and facilitate theacquisition of English.acquisition of English.7.7. The learning potential isThe learning potential isexpanded through faith inexpanded through faith inthe learner.the learner.
  35. 35. Basic StrategiesBasic Strategies building on prior knowledge concepts of print and book language awareness recognising patterns……..repetition, rhyme, rhythm before, during and after reading strategies spelling and phonics instruction and practice making connections to real life response activities……… drawings, graphic organizers,journals recognising genre building vocabulary starting writing processes in tandem with readingprocesses starting speaking and listening skills immediately
  36. 36.  Children learn best when reading authenticChildren learn best when reading authenticliterature.literature. Children respond best when learning takes placeChildren respond best when learning takes placein meaningful contexts.in meaningful contexts. Children grow in language development throughChildren grow in language development throughan integrated curriculum.an integrated curriculum. Children participate actively as members of theChildren participate actively as members of thecommunity of readers and writers.community of readers and writers. Children benefit from ongoing assessment thatChildren benefit from ongoing assessment thatinforms instruction.informs instruction. (from Celebrate Reading )(from Celebrate Reading )
  37. 37. What is whole language?What is whole language?• AttitudeAttitude• A set of beliefsA set of beliefs• ResearchResearch• Fulltime programFulltime program ##• Part of everyday life, not a textbook,Part of everyday life, not a textbook,not a worksheet, not a workbook, notnot a worksheet, not a workbook, nota graded readera graded reader
  38. 38. Why children like wholeWhy children like wholelanguage so much.language so much.• Already knowsAlready knows• HowHow• Real booksReal books• NaturalNatural• CelebrateCelebrate• Something to saySomething to say• RespondRespond• EncourageEncourage• AcknowledgeAcknowledge• ExploringExploring ##• Risk takingRisk taking
  39. 39. Theres nothing pretendTheres nothing pretendabout "pretend" reading.about "pretend" reading.• PracticePractice readingreading• PracticePractice listeninglistening• PracticePractice writingwriting ##• PracticePractice talkingtalking
  40. 40. What does it take to support theseWhat does it take to support theseemerging literacy abilities?emerging literacy abilities?• Rich with printRich with print• Want toWant to• To exploreTo explore• Shopping listsShopping lists• Messages – REMINDMessages – REMINDME TO...ME TO...• BooksBooks• CataloguesCatalogues• Science booksScience books• MagazinesMagazines• Well-organizedWell-organizedbookstorebookstore• Dramatic play areaDramatic play area• Places to writePlaces to write• ‘‘Office’Office’• AuthorsAuthors• PublishersPublishers ##• Real stories by realReal stories by realchildrenchildren
  41. 41. The most important attitude in makingThe most important attitude in makingwhole language work is yours.whole language work is yours.• Active learnersActive learners• Make decisionsMake decisions• InterestInterest• Life-long learnersLife-long learners• Mutual respectMutual respect• A community of learnersA community of learners• On-going evaluationOn-going evaluation• Own progressOwn progress• Successful learningSuccessful learning• See the resultsSee the results• Problem-solveProblem-solve ##• CLILCLIL
  42. 42. Reading and writing emerges inReading and writing emerges instages, just like talking and walkingstages, just like talking and walking• Pretend gamesPretend games• PlayPlay• Pretend scenariosPretend scenarios• ArtworkArtwork• Children’s namesChildren’s names• InventingInventing• WholeWhole ##• Whole language is holistic!Whole language is holistic!
  43. 43. 4.4. Learning takes place asLearning takes place asindividuals practice skillsindividuals practice skillsand form habits.and form habits.5.5. In a second language, oralIn a second language, orallanguage acquisitionlanguage acquisitionprecedes the development ofprecedes the development ofliteracy.literacy.6.6. Learning should take placeLearning should take placein English to facilitate thein English to facilitate theacquisition of English.acquisition of English.7.7. The learning potential ofThe learning potential ofbilingual students is limited.bilingual students is limited.4.4. Learning takes place asLearning takes place asgroups engage in meaningfulgroups engage in meaningfulsocial interaction.social interaction.5.5. In a second language, oralIn a second language, oraland written language areand written language areacquired simultaneously.acquired simultaneously.6.6. Learning should take placeLearning should take placein the first language to buildin the first language to buildconcepts and facilitate theconcepts and facilitate theacquisition of English.acquisition of English.7.7. The learning potential isThe learning potential isexpanded through faith inexpanded through faith inthe learner.the learner.
  44. 44. Basic StrategiesBasic Strategies building on prior knowledge concepts of print and book language awareness recognising patterns……..repetition, rhyme, rhythm before, during and after reading strategies spelling and phonics instruction and practice making connections to real life response activities……… drawings, graphic organizers,journals recognising genre building vocabulary starting writing processes in tandem with readingprocesses starting speaking and listening skills immediately
  45. 45.  Children learn best when reading authenticChildren learn best when reading authenticliterature.literature. Children respond best when learning takes placeChildren respond best when learning takes placein meaningful contexts.in meaningful contexts. Children grow in language development throughChildren grow in language development throughan integrated curriculum.an integrated curriculum. Children participate actively as members of theChildren participate actively as members of thecommunity of readers and writers.community of readers and writers. Children benefit from ongoing assessment thatChildren benefit from ongoing assessment thatinforms instruction.informs instruction. (from Celebrate Reading )(from Celebrate Reading )
  46. 46. What is whole language?What is whole language?• AttitudeAttitude• A set of beliefsA set of beliefs• ResearchResearch• Fulltime programFulltime program ##• Part of everyday life, not a textbook,Part of everyday life, not a textbook,not a worksheet, not a workbook, notnot a worksheet, not a workbook, nota graded readera graded reader
  47. 47. Why children like wholeWhy children like wholelanguage so much.language so much.• Already knowsAlready knows• HowHow• Real booksReal books• NaturalNatural• CelebrateCelebrate• Something to saySomething to say• RespondRespond• EncourageEncourage• AcknowledgeAcknowledge• ExploringExploring ##• Risk takingRisk taking
  48. 48. Theres nothing pretendTheres nothing pretendabout "pretend" reading.about "pretend" reading.• PracticePractice readingreading• PracticePractice listeninglistening• PracticePractice writingwriting ##• PracticePractice talkingtalking
  49. 49. What does it take to support theseWhat does it take to support theseemerging literacy abilities?emerging literacy abilities?• Rich with printRich with print• Want toWant to• To exploreTo explore• Shopping listsShopping lists• Messages – REMINDMessages – REMINDME TO...ME TO...• BooksBooks• CataloguesCatalogues• Science booksScience books• MagazinesMagazines• Well-organizedWell-organizedbookstorebookstore• Dramatic play areaDramatic play area• Places to writePlaces to write• ‘‘Office’Office’• AuthorsAuthors• PublishersPublishers ##• Real stories by realReal stories by realchildrenchildren
  50. 50. The most important attitude in makingThe most important attitude in makingwhole language work is yours.whole language work is yours.• Active learnersActive learners• Make decisionsMake decisions• InterestInterest• Life-long learnersLife-long learners• Mutual respectMutual respect• A community of learnersA community of learners• On-going evaluationOn-going evaluation• Own progressOwn progress• Successful learningSuccessful learning• See the resultsSee the results• Problem-solveProblem-solve ##• CLILCLIL
  51. 51. Reading and writing emerges inReading and writing emerges instages, just like talking and walkingstages, just like talking and walking• Pretend gamesPretend games• PlayPlay• Pretend scenariosPretend scenarios• ArtworkArtwork• Children’s namesChildren’s names• InventingInventing• WholeWhole ##• Whole language is holistic!Whole language is holistic!
  52. 52. The whole language approach "followsThe whole language approach "followsthe child“ rather than having the childthe child“ rather than having the childfollow the curriculum.follow the curriculum.• Are ready for itAre ready for it• Makes senseMakes sense• Talk aboutTalk about• Dramatize aboutDramatize about• Draw aboutDraw about• Sing aboutSing about• Write aboutWrite about• InteractiveInteractive• SocialSocial• Academic processAcademic process ##• MeaningfulMeaningful
  53. 53. Reading aloud WITH childrenReading aloud WITH childrenis key.is key.• Teacher reads to...Teacher reads to...• Drawn into the storyDrawn into the story• Beyond their own experiencesBeyond their own experiences• MeaningMeaning• ‘‘Talk’ aboutTalk’ about• FormatsFormats ##• How books are put togetherHow books are put together
  54. 54. ImmersionImmersionAt HomeAt Home• SpeakingSpeaking• Functional printFunctional printAt SchoolAt School• Sings, labels, lists, diagrams, charts, graphsSings, labels, lists, diagrams, charts, graphs• LiteratureLiterature• Inquiry projectsInquiry projects• DisplaysDisplays• Fiction, non fictionFiction, non fiction• Reference materialsReference materials• Cover the walls with wordsCover the walls with words
  55. 55. DemonstrationDemonstrationAt HomeAt Home• How language is usedHow language is used• How it is tied to actionsHow it is tied to actions• Purposeful situationsPurposeful situationsAt SchoolAt School• How reading and writing are usedHow reading and writing are used• Teachers read and writeTeachers read and write• ““Thinking out loud”Thinking out loud”
  56. 56. ExpectationExpectationAt HomeAt Home• Caretakers assume they will be efficientCaretakers assume they will be efficientAt SchoolAt School• Recognized as a reader and writerRecognized as a reader and writer• Gain confidenceGain confidence• EmpowerEmpower• Responsible and accountableResponsible and accountable
  57. 57. ResponsibilityResponsibilityAt HomeAt Home• Accomplish a taskAccomplish a task• Purpose in their livesPurpose in their lives• Safe to make mistakesSafe to make mistakesAt SchoolAt School• Literacy learningLiteracy learning• SafeSafe• Risk takingRisk taking• PurposefulPurposeful• Variety of contextsVariety of contexts• GroupingsGroupings
  58. 58. UseUseAt HomeAt Home• Use their languageUse their languageAt SchoolAt School• In useIn use• Cannot waitCannot wait• Opportunities to read other’s writingOpportunities to read other’s writing• Try out their own strategiesTry out their own strategies
  59. 59. ApproximationApproximationAt HomeAt Home• Do not speak perfectlyDo not speak perfectlyAt SchoolAt School• SpellingSpelling• ReadingReading• InquiryInquiry• ResearchersResearchers• Conventional reading and writing will developConventional reading and writing will develop
  60. 60. ResponseResponseAt HomeAt Home• Expand on itExpand on it• Rarely correctRarely correctAt SchoolAt School• Expand students’ languageExpand students’ language• Children are tryingChildren are trying• RecognizedRecognized• Not the productNot the product

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