Games for the 21st Century Creative Learner: Use it or Lose it!

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This presentation, on creative games in the language classroom, will explore teacher beliefs about the nature of creativity, break down myths about creativity being difficult and only for the gifted few and will suggest strategies for getting students started on the process of creative speaking. There will be lots of strategies modelled for teachers to find their creative selves and to tap into the creative nature of all students. This will be a reflective plenary which will offer teachers food for thought for changing their classroom practice.

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Games for the 21st Century Creative Learner: Use it or Lose it!

  1. 1. Games and SLA:Games and SLA:The Creative 21The Creative 21ststCentury LearnerCentury LearnerSusan Hillyard B.Ed. (Hons)Susan Hillyard B.Ed. (Hons)Amazing MindsAmazing MindsBrazil 2011Brazil 2011
  2. 2. Our_Creative_Future_[clipnabber.com].mp4
  3. 3. Our Creative FutureOur Creative FutureOur_Creative_Future_[clipnabber.com].mp4
  4. 4. All Our Futures (1999)All Our Futures (1999)Our aim must be to create a nationOur aim must be to create a nationwhere the creative talents of all thewhere the creative talents of all thepeople are used to build a truepeople are used to build a trueenterprise economy for the twentyfirstenterprise economy for the twentyfirstCentury where we compete onCentury where we compete onbrains, not brawn.brains, not brawn.The Prime Minister, the Rt. HonThe Prime Minister, the Rt. Hon Tony Blair MPTony Blair MP
  5. 5. All Our Futures (1999)All Our Futures (1999)If we are to prepare successfully for theIf we are to prepare successfully for thetwenty-first century we will have to do moretwenty-first century we will have to do morethan just improve literacy and numeracythan just improve literacy and numeracyskills. We need a broad, flexible andskills. We need a broad, flexible andmotivating education that recognisesmotivating education that recognisesthe different talents of all children and deliversthe different talents of all children and deliversexcellence for everyone.excellence for everyone.http://www.cypni.org.uk/downloads/alloutfutures.pdfhttp://www.cypni.org.uk/downloads/alloutfutures.pdf
  6. 6. ...we cannot rely on a small elite, no...we cannot rely on a small elite, nomatter how highly educated or highlymatter how highly educated or highlypaid. Instead we need the creativity,paid. Instead we need the creativity,enterprise and scholarship of all ourenterprise and scholarship of all ourpeople.people.Rt. Hon David Blunkett MP,Rt. Hon David Blunkett MP, EmploymentEmployment
  7. 7. Recent Evidence (2009)Recent Evidence (2009)Creativity and innovation have been a key focus ofCreativity and innovation have been a key focus ofattention across the globe in recent years. This isattention across the globe in recent years. This ispartly due to the need to further develop humanpartly due to the need to further develop humancapital.capital.Human capital includes those competences such asHuman capital includes those competences such asinnovation and possessing knowledge whichinnovation and possessing knowledge whichcontribute to economic performance and socialcontribute to economic performance and socialcohesion. Innovation and knowledge have beencohesion. Innovation and knowledge have beenrecognised as the driving forces for sustainablerecognised as the driving forces for sustainablegrowth in the framework of the Lisbon strategy forgrowth in the framework of the Lisbon strategy forthe future of Europe.the future of Europe.Creativity is central to innovation.Creativity is central to innovation.www.europublic.comwww.europublic.com
  8. 8. Finding your Creative SelfFinding your Creative Self““Every animal leaves traces of what it was;Every animal leaves traces of what it was;man alone leaves traces of what he created.”man alone leaves traces of what he created.”BronowskiBronowski    ““Imagination is more important thanImagination is more important thanknowledge. For knowledge is limited,knowledge. For knowledge is limited,whereas imagination embraces the entirewhereas imagination embraces the entireworld”world”EinsteinEinstein
  9. 9. Why PLAY?Why PLAY? Various theories e.g. CATHARTIC, ongoingVarious theories e.g. CATHARTIC, ongoingtraditional theory cited by many. Attempts bytraditional theory cited by many. Attempts bythe child to re-experience, resolve, master,the child to re-experience, resolve, master,difficult, even traumatic, situationsdifficult, even traumatic, situations
  10. 10. Play and GamesPlay and Games Stanley Hall:Stanley Hall: Recapitulation TheoryRecapitulation Theory i.e. playi.e. playreflects the course of evolution in each andreflects the course of evolution in each andevery child.every child. Spencer:Spencer:Expenditure of Surplus Energy TheoryExpenditure of Surplus Energy Theory i.e.i.e.the employment of normal patterns ofthe employment of normal patterns ofbehaviour, often repeated but with no goal.behaviour, often repeated but with no goal. Groose:Groose: Instinct TheoryInstinct Theory i.e. preparation for adulti.e. preparation for adultperformance.performance. Reynolds:Reynolds: Simulative Mode TheorySimulative Mode Theory i.e. thei.e. thechild simulates behaviours he observes fromchild simulates behaviours he observes fromother affective/behavioural systems, outside theother affective/behavioural systems, outside thecontext.context.
  11. 11. Drama Games and Drama PlayDrama Games and Drama PlayGamesGames warm upswarm ups ice breakersice breakers concentrationconcentration drilldrill fluencyfluency soundscapessoundscapes mime and movementmime and movementPlayPlay DialoguesDialogues Role playRole play ImprovisationImprovisation StorydramaStorydrama Process dramaProcess drama Mantle of the ExpertMantle of the Expert Forum TheatreForum Theatre PresentationsPresentations
  12. 12. Flipping the ClassroomFlipping the Classroomhttp://www.ted.com/talks/salman_khan_let_s_use_video_to_reinvent_education.htmlhttp://www.ted.com/talks/salman_khan_let_s_use_video_to_reinvent_education.htmlNOWNOW Teacher presents content inTeacher presents content inthe classroomthe classroom Students follow up withStudents follow up withhomework at homehomework at homeIN THE FUTUREIN THE FUTURE Teacher as PerformerTeacher as Performer Content is presented at homeContent is presented at homeby a virtual teacher who hasby a virtual teacher who hasprepared the lesson onprepared the lesson onvideo/youtube/voicethread/video/youtube/voicethread/WIZIQWIZIQ Students follow up withStudents follow up withinteractive tasks in theinteractive tasks in theclassroom with the realclassroom with the realteacher.teacher.
  13. 13. Play is a special way of violatingPlay is a special way of violatingfixityfixityBrunerBrunerThe sick, the bewildered, theThe sick, the bewildered, thefrightened child does not playfrightened child does not playGarveyGarvey
  14. 14. GamesGamesInformalInformal Traditional childhoodTraditional childhood BoardBoard PlaygroundPlayground PartyParty Paper and pencilPaper and pencil QuizzesQuizzes TVTVFormalFormal DramaDrama LanguageLanguage MathsMaths ICTICT
  15. 15. What is a game?What is a game?Four elements:Four elements:1) Cooperation or Competition1) Cooperation or Competition2) Chance or Skill2) Chance or Skill3) Uncertainty3) Uncertainty4) Reward: Intrinsic or Concrete4) Reward: Intrinsic or Concrete
  16. 16. Game =Anactivitycarriedoutbycooperatingorcompetingdecisionmakersseekingtoachieve,withinasetofrules,theirobjectives.
  17. 17. AnalysisT’s instructions?Level? Timing?Age?Lang.objectives?Grouping? Reward?Materials?Title?
  18. 18. StudentsAdmin TeachersPhilosophy of Education
  19. 19. activity rulescompetitionluckGamecooperationmomentumobjectivesdecisionsskills
  20. 20. Language ActiveAffectiveWhy includegames inlang. class?Life skills Self esteem
  21. 21. GamesLanguageSpecific GeneralSpellingVocab.PronunciationLexical setsFunctionsStructuresCOMMUNICATIONCorrectnessClosedRisk TakingOpen
  22. 22. Teacher’s Role• kid observer• facilitator• informant• refereeAffectiveActiveLearningLife SkillsLocus of ControlTransferable skillsSelf Esteem CooperationNIEMotivationProgressCompetenceCurriculumLatent
  23. 23. A i m s Working together Completing something Reproducing something Ordering sequences Finding Solving Finishing First Getting points Survivingelimination Avoiding penaltiesCooperative Competitive
  24. 24. I n t e r a c t i o n• Everyone together• Group• Group with group• Duo with rest• Team with team• Individual against rest• Individuals as individuals•Teams against teams•Groups against groupsCooperative Competitive
  25. 25. F u n c t i o n s Giving instructions Following instructions Exchanging info. Producing formal L. Questioning Quick conclusions Responding correctly JustifyingCooperative Competitive

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