Introduction: Are you a Manager or a Leader?

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Introduction: Are you a Manager or a Leader?

  1. 1. Are You a Manager or aLeader?Speaker: Susan Hillyard B.Ed.(Hons)Tel: 4541-3010e-mail: ssnhillyard@gmail.comAbstractThis reflective workshop for coordinators and heads of departments,compares new leadership skills with old management skills in theadministrative office. We will look at existing structures and consider thecurrent calls for change in educational settings. We will analyse the needs oforganizations, the nature of the change process and question to what extentyou and your school are on the change-ready paradigm. We will examine anumber of theories through the reflective process and look at the notion ofcreative leadership.The thrust is on forging sound relationships throughlistening, developing a system of effective communication and modellingnatural authority rather than authority by position.HandoutsQuestions for Today1. Why is there a call for change?2. What are the existing structures like?3. What are your needs?4. What’s the difference between Management and Leadership?5. How can we change if we want to do so?6. Where are you in the change-ready paradigm?7. Where is your school in the change-ready process?Exercise 1: Talk TimeLook at a collage. Choose 2 images and write eithera) a caption orb) a comment related to your own feelingsSusan Hillyard – AYML
  2. 2. Exercise 2: Think TimeMc Gregor’s Theory X and Theory YDouglas McGregor developed a philosophical view of humankind with hisTheory X and Theory Y in 1960. These are two opposing perceptions abouthow people view human behaviour at work and in organizational life. Areyou a Ms X or a Ms Y?Theory X - With Theory X assumptions, managements role is to coerce andcontrol employees.• People have an inherent dislike for work and will avoid it wheneverpossible.• People must be coerced, controlled, directed, or threatened withpunishment in order to get them to achieve the organizationalobjectives.• People prefer to be directed, do not want responsibility, and havelittle or no ambition.• People seek security above all else.Theory Y - With Theory Y assumptions, managements role is to develop thepotential in employees and help them to release that potential towardscommon goals.• Work is as natural as play and rest.• People will exercise self-direction if they are committed to theobjectives (they are NOT lazy).• Commitment to objectives is a function of the rewards associatedwith their achievement.• People learn to accept and seek responsibility.• Creativity, ingenuity, and imagination are widely distributedamong the population. People are capable of using these abilitiesto solve an organizational problem.• People have potential.•Susan Hillyard – AYML
  3. 3. Exercise 3: Match the descriptions with the ScreenbeansInnovation Theory:1 InnovatorsTypically people who are enthusiasts, highly knowledgeable, and who mayeven play a vital role in the invention of the innovation itself.2 Early adoptersUsually people who are well placed in social networks, who attendconferences and who have the confi dence to adopt innovations before themajority. Early adopters are often influential opinion leaders.3 Early majority adoptersThis group represent the point at which the innovation takes off. They oftenrely on recommendations from opinion leaders.4 The late majorityThese take up the innovation when it becomes impossible not to do sobecause everyone else has. It is the point at which NOT adopting carrieswith it penalties. However, they will be looking for a proven, well debuggedproduct which can be adopted quickly without pain. The motives and aimsof these later, mainstream adopters are often very different from those ofearly adopters. Although they are the late majority, their power to form anopinion block should not be underestimated.5 The ‘laggards’A resistant minority who will be very slow to adopt, or who may never doso. Their motives for non-adoption may be varied, from poverty through tocircumstance or ideology. The standard distribution curve used by manyanalysts suggests laggards may total around 16% of the total population.Exercise 4: Maslow’s Pyramid and TrustTo what extent does your school help the staff to reach the pinnacle? Howwell trusted are your staff?Exercise 5: The Basis of Natural AuthorityChanging: The thrust is on forging sound relationships, developing a systemof effective communication and modeling natural authority rather thanauthority by position. We are working with people, not paper or machinesand this sensitivity must override all other considerations.• integrity• fairnessSusan Hillyard – AYML
  4. 4. • confidence• the putting of others before self• respect and concern for others• an understanding of people as people• an ability to make decisions• acceptance of responsibility• breadth of vision• an ability to tell the story of the people to the people• knowledge of the job.Personal Leadership Checklist• Am I X or Y?• Do I set aside planned time to talk to people and do I REALLY DO it?• Before taking decisions do I consult with the ones who will be affected?• Am I approachable?• Does each member of my team have an individual development plan?• Do members of the team come to me with ideas?• Do I react to CHANGE negatively or positively?• Do I communicate well?• Am I a good listener?• How well do I manage time?• Do I make decisions well?• Do I delegate well?• Am I enthusiastic?• Do I always put others before myself?BIBLIOGRAPHY• Ashbaugh, C.R. and Kasten K. L. 1991 Educational Leadership Longman, NY• Freire P, 1993, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Continuum, New YorkSusan Hillyard – AYML
  5. 5. • Hartle F, Everall K, and Baker C, 2001, Performance Management, Kogan Page, London• Walling, D.R. Ed. 1994, Teachers as Leaders, Phi Delta Kappa Ed Foundation,Bloomington, Indiana• Pedler, M,Burgoyne, J, Boydell T. 1978 A Manager’s Guide to Self Development McGraw-Hill, UK• SEDL Organisation Retrieved 050912 http://www.sedl.org/pubs/change34/• The Quantum Theory of Trust Retrieved 050912 http://www.netform.com/html/s+b%20article.pdf• Siemens G: Connectivism Retrieved 050912 http://www.itdl.org/Journal/Jan_05/article01.htmSusan Hillyard – AYML
  6. 6. • Hartle F, Everall K, and Baker C, 2001, Performance Management, Kogan Page, London• Walling, D.R. Ed. 1994, Teachers as Leaders, Phi Delta Kappa Ed Foundation,Bloomington, Indiana• Pedler, M,Burgoyne, J, Boydell T. 1978 A Manager’s Guide to Self Development McGraw-Hill, UK• SEDL Organisation Retrieved 050912 http://www.sedl.org/pubs/change34/• The Quantum Theory of Trust Retrieved 050912 http://www.netform.com/html/s+b%20article.pdf• Siemens G: Connectivism Retrieved 050912 http://www.itdl.org/Journal/Jan_05/article01.htmSusan Hillyard – AYML

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