Communicating andMaking MathematicalConnections
Value Line or Four Corners
Value Line or Four Corners
As you enter a classroom, ask yourself thisquestion: "If there were no students in the room,could I do what I am planning ...
Mathematical processes connect theprocedural to the conceptual.Through the action of processstandards, students display th...
Turn and Talk…How students learn is just asimportant as what students learn.
Experiencing Communication and Connections   Read the instructions below, then    plan your actions using the    thinking...
If you were to place avalue or a number oneach piece, what wouldthey be?Think Pair Share…
Communication One of the 7 mathematical process standards Talking and writing are critical processes which students  dev...
Five Productive Talk Moves…1. Re-voicing – Repeating what students have saidand then asking for clarificationSo you’re say...
Observing and Questioning
Quick Write…                                         How did                                         questioning and      ...
Connections to Math in the Real World3D Solids and 2D Shapes
Jigsaw                                              Create a learning                                              environ...
Round Table (also called “Round Robin”)What mathematical operation doesthis make you think of?
How many ways can you representthis photo?      Use the math tools provided.
Value Line or Four Corners
Tell me a story!
Sum conference powerpoint
Sum conference powerpoint
Sum conference powerpoint
Sum conference powerpoint
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Sum conference powerpoint

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  • Value Line or Four CornersThe teacher presents an issue, topic, or question to the students. Then, the teacher assignsa value scale to each possible student response. For example, the teacher might introducea 1-10 Scale where 1=strong agreement and 10=strong disagreement. Students are thenasked to form a line based on how they rank their response based on the scale. Afterstudents line up, the teacher guides a discussion about the topic. After discussion,consider having the students re-evaluate where they wish to stand in the line. Analternative to value line is to ask post four answers to a question and then ask students togo to the corner that best represents their answer or perspective.
  • I love this quote as it really speaks to the mathematical processes and content. Math content standards are teachers teach and students learn. Math processes are how teachers teach and how students learn.Over this hour please take note that it was not planned as a sit and deliver and you sit and listen. Have you ever been to a PD where all the presenter did was read from their power point? You should never walk out from a PD valuing the PPT notes but rather the experiences and discoveries you made.
  • Think, Pair, ShareThink, Pair, Share, involves three components. First, each student is prompted tocomplete a task or answer a question that requires them to think. Second, each student isprompted to pair up with another student to compare, contrast or confirm the productcreated during the thinking phase. Students are also prompted to adjust their productbased on their conversation with their learning partner. Third, students are prompted toshare with the rest of the class what they have learned during the entire activity. Think,Pair, Share usually involves more complicated activities than Turn-to-your -neighbor.
  • Number and Shape and Space. Have the outcomes on place cards on the tables. Copy thinking sheets.
  • Think Pair Share
  • PODS
  • Modified Jigsaw- JigsawStudents are organized into groups with equal numbers of participants. Each group isgiven a portion of some larger task (perhaps an to read part of a chapter or part of anessay) being covered during the class. For example, six groups of students may beformed to study six different sections of a research article. Each group works to learntheir material so well that they will be able to teach it to others. After each group hasread and learned their portion of the material, the groups are reconfigured so that eachnew group has a participant from each of the previous groups. Then each memberteaches the others his or her version of the material until everyone has taught theirmaterial and all the content has been covered.
  • Round Table (also called “Round Robin”)Divide the class into groups and pose a question. Ask one student to write an answer ona paper and then pass paper to the person beside him or her in the group. Every studenthas a turn at answering the question. The group with the most correct answers isrecognized. Another way of doing Round Table is to have all student answer on paperand then have the group put all of their answers together with, again, the group with themost right answers being recognized. At the end of the activity, review answers,strategies, and ways of improvement.
  • Round Table (also called “Round Robin”)Divide the class into groups and pose a question. Ask one student to write an answer ona paper and then pass paper to the person beside him or her in the group. Every studenthas a turn at answering the question. The group with the most correct answers isrecognized. Another way of doing Round Table is to have all student answer on paperand then have the group put all of their answers together with, again, the group with themost right answers being recognized. At the end of the activity, review answers,strategies, and ways of improvement.
  • Value Line or Four CornersThe teacher presents an issue, topic, or question to the students. Then, the teacher assignsa value scale to each possible student response. For example, the teacher might introducea 1-10 Scale where 1=strong agreement and 10=strong disagreement. Students are thenasked to form a line based on how they rank their response based on the scale. Afterstudents line up, the teacher guides a discussion about the topic. After discussion,consider having the students re-evaluate where they wish to stand in the line. Analternative to value line is to ask post four answers to a question and then ask students togo to the corner that best represents their answer or perspective.
  • Graffiti… Grade One to Adult: A Cooperative Learning TacticGraffiti is a creative brainstorming process that involves collecting the wisdom of all or most of the students in the class. Method: You may wish to begin by introducing the concept of Graffiti; it helps make the process moremeaningful for studentsPlace students into groups of three or four Provide a large sheet of paper (station) for each groupEach piece of paper has a topic / question in the middle (can be same or different for each group)Students get a reasonable amount of Wait Time to think Then a specified amount of Record Time to write down their answers on the sheetThen the group stands up and goes to another station and adds their information to theinformation already there They should NOT read info already there. Duplication is irrelevant, and often can simply indicatethat info is important.The process continues until all groups have visited all stationsWhen they return, they now have the collective wisdom of the classConsiderations:Consider giving each group different coloured pens. When inappropriate comments happen, andthey do, it is easier to trace.Know how you will deal with inappropriate comments before you begin 
  • Sum conference powerpoint

    1. 1. Communicating andMaking MathematicalConnections
    2. 2. Value Line or Four Corners
    3. 3. Value Line or Four Corners
    4. 4. As you enter a classroom, ask yourself thisquestion: "If there were no students in the room,could I do what I am planning to do?" If youranswer to the question is yes, dont do it.(Gen. Ruben Cubero, Dean of The Faculty, United States Air Force Academy)
    5. 5. Mathematical processes connect theprocedural to the conceptual.Through the action of processstandards, students display theirinteraction with the mathematics thatdevelops into a deeper understandingfor all. (Ontario Ministry of Education, 2008)
    6. 6. Turn and Talk…How students learn is just asimportant as what students learn.
    7. 7. Experiencing Communication and Connections Read the instructions below, then plan your actions using the thinking sheet provided Make 3 cuts 2 pieces need to be of equal length. The other pieces need to be of different lengths Be prepared to prove your work.
    8. 8. If you were to place avalue or a number oneach piece, what wouldthey be?Think Pair Share…
    9. 9. Communication One of the 7 mathematical process standards Talking and writing are critical processes which students develop content standards. Credit 24-7 Teacher
    10. 10. Five Productive Talk Moves…1. Re-voicing – Repeating what students have saidand then asking for clarificationSo you’re saying it’s an odd number?2. Repeating – Asking students to restate someoneelse’s reasoningCan you repeat what he just said in your ownwords?3. Reasoning – Asking students to apply their ownreasoning to someone else’s reasoningDo you agree or disagree and why?4. Adding on – Prompting students for furtherparticipationWould someone like to add something more tothat?5. Waiting – Using wait time Take your time …
    11. 11. Observing and Questioning
    12. 12. Quick Write… How did questioning and conversation with this kindergarten student reveal a deeper understanding ?Classrooms that celebrate mathematicaldiscourse benefit both teacher andstudent.
    13. 13. Connections to Math in the Real World3D Solids and 2D Shapes
    14. 14. Jigsaw Create a learning environment in which students are encouraged to make connections among multiple representations. (NCTM, August 2010)“Translating and moving flexibly betweenrepresentations is a key aspect of studentsmathematical understanding.”
    15. 15. Round Table (also called “Round Robin”)What mathematical operation doesthis make you think of?
    16. 16. How many ways can you representthis photo? Use the math tools provided.
    17. 17. Value Line or Four Corners
    18. 18. Tell me a story!

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