Dart addition Grade 2

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Dart addition Grade 2

  1. 1. Day 5<br />Strand: Number<br />Addition and Subtraction to 100<br />Identify the outcomes to be learned<br />N2.2 Demonstrate and understanding of addition (limited to 1 and 2 digit numerals) with answers to 100 and corresponding subtraction by:<br />representing strategies for adding and subtracting concretely, pictorially, and symbolically<br />creating and solving problems involving addition and subtraction<br />estimating<br />using personal strategies for adding and subtracting with and without the support of manipulatives<br />analyzing the effect of adding or subtracting zero<br />analyzing the effect of the ordering of the quantities (addends, minuends, and subtrahends) in addition and subtraction statements.<br />Big Ideas of Addition and Subtraction<br />Develop understanding of addition and subtraction strategies for basic addition facts and related subtraction facts.<br />Develop an understanding of base ten and place value concepts.<br />Essential Questions: How can understanding addition and subtraction help us solve problems? What is the relationship between addition and subtraction?<br />How does place value affect a number? How can base ten materials help us understand the strategies of regrouping for addition and subtraction?<br />Focus: Adding Tens<br />Determine how the learning will be observed<br />What will the children do to know that the learning has occurred?<br />What should children do to demonstrate the understanding of the mathematical concepts, skills, and big ideas?<br />What assessment tools will be the most suitable to provide evidence of student understanding?<br />How can I document the children’s learning?<br />Documentation for student learning will be in the form of a rubric, assessing their “Dart Addition Target Game”. I want to find out if students are able to add tens and represent their work concretely pictorially and symbolically. Are there any areas I need to focus my teaching on?<br />The problem has been differentiated into three levels of ability. It is an open ended question with a variety of entry points. Students will be encouraged to use manipulatives and show their work using pictures, numbers and words in a graphic organizer. Assessment as learning will take place in a journal activity that will follow this lesson.<br />Name: ________________ Date: _____________<br />ConcretelyHas difficulty representing or choosing the appropriate manipulative to add two or more numbers together.Needs a lot of assistance to get started.Has very little difficulty representing or choosing the appropriate manipulative to add two or more numbers together.Needs minimal assistance to get started.Has no difficulty representing or choosing the appropriate manipulative to add two or more numbers together.May even represent using more than one manipulative.Needs no assistance to get started.PictoriallyHas difficulty representing the addition of two or more numbers together in a picture.Needs a lot of assistance to get started.The picture has no detail and is difficult to understand.Has difficulty representing the addition of two or more numbers together in a picture.Needs a lot of assistance to get started.The picture has some detail.Has no difficulty representing the addition of two or more numbers together in a picture.Needs no assistance to get started.The picture is very detailed and easy to understand.Symbolically18+3=213+18=2121-18=321-3=18Has difficulty representing the addition of two or more numbers numerically in number sentence.Attempts or Shows one- two number sentences. May even be incorrect.Has no difficulty representing the addition of two or more numbers numerically in number sentence.Attempts or Shows two-four correct number sentences.Has no difficulty representing the addition of two or more numbers numerically in number sentence.Attempts or Shows more than four number sentences.<br />Does the student extend his or her thinking? <br />Comments:<br />Plan the learning environment and instruction<br />What learning opportunities and experiences should I provide to promote the learning outcomes?<br />What will the learning environment look like?<br />What strategies do children use to access prior knowledge and continually communicate and represent understanding?<br />What teaching strategies and resources will I use?<br /> Materials Needed:<br />SMART board or chart paper<br />Coins to cut and paste/ real coins or manipulatives<br />Base ten material/ cut and paste tens and ones/ place value mat<br />Small hundreds charts<br />Linking cubes/ cut and paste linking cubes<br />Small ten frames/ power of ten cards<br />Graphic organizer<br />Place value numbers/ cut and paste numbers<br />Before:<br />Begin with Making Connections by looking at two photos of yesterday’s math class. There are three sentence starters that will get the students reflecting on their learning from yesterday.<br />Display a dart board and have students tell you what they know about dart boards. Have one or two volunteers share.<br />Discuss least and greatest<br />Let’s play a game of addition darts, you all have 15 points to start. We need to throw three darts and add our total score. Have volunteers come up and throw the bean bag. Model the addition sentence.<br />Do two examples of this and then students will try to find the least and greatest score with their partner.<br />You will be working with a partner to find the least and greatest score. You have 15 points and three darts.<br />Show your addition sentences.<br />How did you solve this problem? How did you know what numbers to add to find the least score? Greatest?<br />Students will be working independently on a problem similar tho the one with their partner. It is the same problem in three different levels. It is open-ended to invite all learning abilities.<br /><ul><li>Assess student learning and follow up
  2. 2. What conclusions can be made from assessment information?
  3. 3. How effective have instructional strategies been?
  4. 4. What are the next steps for instruction?
  5. 5. How will the gaps in the development of understanding be addressed?
  6. 6. How will the children extend their learning?
  7. 7. * These are questions that you can answer and we can discuss together after the lesson. Student work can be evaluated and comments about observations can be addressed.</li></ul>Assessment as learning- students can reflect on how they feel about their understanding of adding tens.<br />

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