Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
August inservice k12 powerpoint
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

August inservice k12 powerpoint

570

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
570
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Welcome everyone and thank you for bringing your resources today. My name is Susan muir. I am a k-1 teacher at Macdonald School in Stockholm.
  • Some of you may have thought about the new mathematics curriculum and wondered how it differs from the previous curriculum. How is traditional math different from the recent changes in school mathematics? What are the implications for the classroom? This morning we will talk about some of these changes .
  • Think Pair share activity
  • For much of the 20 th century children were thought to be “blank slates”. Who learned little or no math until they began school unless they were purposely taught. Research in cognitive psychology gathered over the last 25 years suggests other wise. Infants have an innate sensitivity to number that allows them to discriminate between collections of one, two of three items and notice the effect of addition or subtraction one item from the small set. As children get older their mathematical learning develops through their every day activities. Through these experiences children develop a body of informational knowledge about numbers, patterns, shapes, quantity, data and size which they draw on to invent strategies to solve mathematical problems presented in familiar or relevant contexts. These capabilities form the foundation for children's learning later in school.
  • Each new year provides an opportunity to create a community of learners in the classroom. As facilitators of learning, we are responsible for creating a classroom environment that will allow each student to experience success. The reward is knowing children will view math as fun, exciting, engaging, and something that they are capable of doing.
  • Have teachers do a reflective write. Show video. What did the meeting area Look Like? Sound Like?
  • These grouping should not be static but should stay together for at least a month so students can become familiar with one another.
  • The classroom setup should Promote independence for students Provide choice within a structured area Be organized in a way that encourages sharing and responsibility
  • Regular exposure to mathematics vocabulary enables students to use vocabulary in daily activities. A math word wall grows throughout the year. As new vocabulary words are introduced/ add to word wall with a picture or a symbol that can accompany it. You can also use the word wall as a mathematical journal entry. “Tell what you know about ___”
  • Students provide a written or visual reflection of their mathematical experience for the day. You may provide the sentence starter to guide their thoughts.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Mathematics: Framework for Change By Susan Muir K-4 Math Coach
    • 2. Agenda
      • Changes in Mathematics
      • How is Mathematics Learned?
      • -short video clip
      • Creating a Mathematical Community in the Classroom
      • LUNCH
      • Resources- Components overview
      • Where can I begin? Focus strand: Patterning
      • Planning for instruction
      • Assessment
    • 3. Dr. Florence Glanfield - 12 min. video
      • Framework For Change:
      • What is Mathematics?
      • Why is the Teaching of Mathematics Changing?
    • 4. Questions for Reflection
      • Which perspectives of mathematics outlined in the video most closely reflect your beliefs about Mathematics?
      • How do your beliefs influence your teaching?
      • How might your beliefs influence your students’ learning?
      • Reflections on Research in School Mathematics
      • Florence Glanfield
    • 5. How is Mathematics Learned?
      • Annenberg Video Clip
      • Surprises In Mind
    • 6. Questions for Reflection
      • How do we create classrooms that reflect and respond to the emerging research about how mathematics is learned?
      • Think back to your educational experiences and curriculum changes that you have observed. Which changes have
          • come and gone?
          • come and stayed?
          • come, stayed and improved learning?
              • Reflections on Research in School Mathematics
              • Florence Glanfield
    • 7. Coffee Break
    • 8. Climate and Environment: Creating a Mathematical Community in the Classroom
    • 9. Group Meeting Area
      • Central to the life of any community is a group meeting area.
      • This is a place where every member gets together to learn what it means to be part of a community.
    • 10. Using the Meeting Area
      • What do you think an effective meeting area
      • LOOKS LIKE?
      • SOUNDS LIKE?
    • 11. Questions??
    • 12. Using the Meeting Area
      • To introduce a new mathematical concept with a guiding question
      • To brainstorm what students already know about a mathematical topic
      • To share a new manipulative and explore possible uses
      • To revisit a mathematical concept to reinforce a specific skill
      • Introduce a math centre
      • Discuss difficulties arising from a previous lesson
      • The show and share stage of the three part lesson model
              • Pearson Math Makes Sense
    • 13. Creating the Physical Environment
      • Desk Arrangement
      • When students’ desks are arranged in a group, the students become members of a unit and develop a sense of belonging.
      • The way you arrange your desks/ tables can vary, depending on how you teach and your preference.
    • 14. Floor Plan
    • 15. Storage of Materials
    • 16. Math Word Wall
    • 17. Math Journals
    • 18. Math Tubs for Centres
    • 19. Using a Variety of Manipulatives from the Environment
    • 20. Math Mini Offices
    • 21. Math at Home
    • 22. Questions about Creating a Mathematical Environment
    • 23. Lunch Break
      • After lunch:
      • We will have a look at curriculum and resource materials
        • Components overview
        • Where can I begin? Focus strand: Patterning
        • Big ideas/ Key Principles/ Planning for Instruction
        • Assessment
    • 24. Components Overview
    • 25. Teacher’s Resource Guide
    • 26. Teacher’s Guide
      • Both Nelson And Pearson have CD-Rom
      • Program Overview gives an in-depth look at the program principles
      • Pearson Kindergarten has
      • 5 modules (units)
      • Nelson has 4 modules: Patterning, Number, Measurement, 3-D Objects. They are set up into 3 sections A,B,C(pg.12-13)
    • 27. Grades 1-2
      • Pearson grade 1-2 has 7 modules (units)
      • Nelson has grade 1-2 has 10 modules (units)
    • 28. Big Book- Poster Pack
      • Kindergarten
      • Grade1-2
      • Pearson has posters in a big book form where Nelson has posters in a box
    • 29. Student Books
      • Student Books are not part of core components
      • Both Nelson and Pearson have student workbooks and little books, as well, games and music
    • 30. Focus Strand : Patterning
    • 31. What are the Big Ideas or Key Principles?
      • Spend a few moments in your group and read over the first few pages of the unit on patterning.
      • Be prepared to have a short discussion
    • 32. Unit 1: Patterning
      • Kindergarten- Nelson
      • Section A: Sorting Objects and Recognizing Patterns Around Us
      • Pages 76-77 Teacher’s Guide
      • Choose a lesson to look review
      • Kindergarten-Pearson
      • -------------------------------------------
      • Pearson- Grade One (Two)
        • Unit 1 Patterning
        • Lesson 4: Translate A Pattern
        • Pages 20-21 Teacher’s Guide
        • Nelson- Grade One (Two)
        • Lesson 4
        • Pages 18-19 Teacher’s Guide
    • 33. Reflection Questions
      • *Find the lesson outcome(s) in the curriculum
      • How does this lesson build on prior knowledge?
      • How does it accommodate a variety of levels and learning styles?
      • How is the problem presented to the children?
      • Does the problem leave room for more than one strategy to solve?
      • How is communication integrated into the lesson?
      • What would you see the role of the teacher during the lesson?
      • Are students given opportunity to clarify, refine, practice and apply their thinking? If so how?
      • How would you evaluate this lesson?
    • 34. Assessment
    • 35. Rethinking Classroom Assessment with a Purpose in Mind WNCP
      • The book, which is available in English and in French, is organized into three sections:
      • Setting the Stage provides background information about why assessment has moved recently to the forefront and why it is important for educators in all positions to understand both the changes that are occurring in assessment and the implications of these changes for policy and practice. It includes an outline of three purposes of classroom assessment—assessment for learning, assessment as learning, and assessment of learning—and a vignette, which shows all three in action.
      • Three Purposes of Assessment provides a detailed description of the three purposes of assessment that form the framework for thinking about how to select or develop assessment tasks, how to use them, and how to communicate with students, parents, and others about them. Case examples from teachers in WNCP territories and provinces are included in each of the chapters of this section.
      • Next Steps suggests that rethinking assessment is a process of reflection, analysis, deliberation and new learning for educators. This process involves building individual and collective capacity and can be fostered at the level of the school, the district or division, and the province or territory. This section suggests ways that educators might engage in the process.
      • Taken from: page ix “Rethinking Classroom Assessment With a Purpose In Mind”
    • 36. Planning Your Year http://susanmuir.blogspot.com/
    • 37.
            • Have a Wonderful Year
            • Questions:
            • Susan Muir
            • Macdonald School

    ×