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Kartograph - Urban Mapping with Mobile Augmented Reality
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Kartograph - Urban Mapping with Mobile Augmented Reality

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Kartograph - Urban Mapping with Mobile Augmented Reality is a conceptual prototype for a mobile application designed to allow users to explore their urban environment and engage in social interaction.

Kartograph - Urban Mapping with Mobile Augmented Reality is a conceptual prototype for a mobile application designed to allow users to explore their urban environment and engage in social interaction.

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  • 1. KARTOGRAPHMAPPING THE MOBILE CITY
  • 2. TOC INTRODUCTION - The Emergent City - Information Urban Networks - Barthes: Speaking the City PROJECT SCOPE and PROJECT PLAN PROTOTYPE SPEAKING THE CITY - CONCLUSION
  • 3. INTRODUCTION:THE EMERGENT CITYThe city experience is a web ofconnected networks and multilayered threaded paths thatcondition us to the emotional stateof the city space. In essence, thecity fabric is a giant multi user multidata sphere. To take part you reallyhave to put something backin, thats like life. In this case, totake part you have to input data soothers may see the output of thedata response.- Fabian Neuhaus,  I‟Park City by UNStudio, Suwon, South KoreaThe Emergent City, Urban Tick, 11May 2010
  • 4. URBAN INFORMATIONNETWORKSUtopian and radical architects in the1960s predicted that cities in thefuture would not only be made ofbrick and mortar, but also defined bybits and flows of information. Theurban dweller would become anomad who inhabits a space inconstant flux, mutating in real time.Their vision has taken on newmeaning in an age when informationnetworks rule over many of the citysfunctions, and define ourexperiences as much as the physicalinfrastructures, while mobiletechnologies transform our sense oftime and of space. - HABITAR Project, aboralcentrodearte.org  Architectural rendering of Masdar City, Abu Dhabi, designed by Foster + Partners.
  • 5. Speaking the city: BarthesWalking in the city, people invent their ownurban idioms, a local language written in thestreets, and read as if out loud. A strangecity, too, can seem like a language you don‟tknow. Gradually, you pick up a fewwords, recognize certain expressions, try outsome turn of phrase. Navigating the city, wecompose spatial sentences that begin tomake sense, gradually master the intricategrammar of the streets. Slowly, we learn tomake the spaces of the city speak.- Space, the city and social theory: socialrelations and urban forms by Fran Tonkiss Evan Hecox, Kyoto Street, 2004
  • 6. Tracking the movement of a mouse on a screen for 1.9 hours using IOGraphica, flickr.com PROJECT SCOPE
  • 7. PROJECT SCOPETechnical Requirements• Cloud Hosting and server farm• KML markup language• Cocoon and Cocoa iPhone development• Web 2.x application development technologies meeting web standards and requirements• Graphical design• APIs – Google, Twitter, Trendsmap and others• Ushahidi platform for web client integration and data analysisEnd-user Requirements• A late model iPhone: iPhone 3 or greater• AT&T provider servicesDeliverables• An iPhone app available from Apple‟s iTunes store• Web site promoting iPhone application• Social media integration: partnership with Facebook, for example
  • 8. PROJECT PLAN
  • 9. KARTOGRAPH FEATURES•Allows users to explore their cities and theirurban environment•Map their travels in a custom map of visitedlocations or desired sites to visit•Voice-Record narratives as tweets and walkingtours•Attach geotagged maps, images, and tweets•Filter views with AR location maps•Filter on location-based trends sourced fromBrizzly, Foursquare, Trendsmap and Twitter•Filter on key tags such as News, Traffic, Policeand Fire•Filter on text and voice tags•Share locations via social networks and email;sync with Facebook
  • 10. KARTOGRAPH FEATURES GPS and Navigate Map and Social Filter by Media Trend Save Connect recorded with others location and trip history
  • 11. KARTOGRAPH FEATURES•Allows users to explore their cities and theirurban environment•Map their travels in a custom map of visitedlocations or desired sites to visit•Voice-Record narratives as tweets and walkingtours•Attach geotagged maps, images, and tweets•Filter views with AR location maps•Filter on location-based trends sourced fromBrizzly, Foursquare, Trendsmap and Twitter•Filter on key tags such as News, Traffic, Policeand Fire•Filter on text and voice tags•Share locations via social networks and email;sync with Facebook
  • 12. AR VIEWS Bar Any Café Lewis Teheranno St. 2 blocks left
  • 13. Speaking the city: Barthes[Roland Barthes‟] urban semioticstakes the city not simply as text to beread, but as a vivid mobile languageto be spoken. Cities are for Barthesboth a kind of writing and the urbanuser a „kind of reader‟), and amanner of speaking. „The city‟, as heputs it, „speaks to its inhabitants, wespeak our city, the city where weare, simply by living in it, bywandering through it‟ (Barthes, 1997:168).- Space, the city and social theory: social relations andurban forms by Fran Tonkiss Marrakech Souk, Morocco, flickr.com
  • 14. Language students use the mobile phone in their dailylife – both as students and as ordinary citizens (Chen2007). They use their mobile phones to they takephotos of friends and the places they visit. They sendphotos as MMS to their contacts or send them to theirown Internet site. They are able to download and playmedia files such as music or short films. They canaccess the Internet and check their emails.Moreover, they can search for a variety of services onthe Internet. If they wish to locate a street, they can, forexample use “Google maps” which can be downloadedin their phones.Bo-Kristensen, M, Ankerstjerne, N. O, Wulff, C, and Schelde, H. “Mobile City and Language Guides - NewLinks Between Formal and Informal Learning Environments” Electronic Journal of e-Learning Volume 7Issue 2 2009, (pp85 - 92), available online at www.ejel.org