Alcoholism and Dementia:Is there a relation?<br />By Danny Gallegos<br />
Agenda<br /><ul><li> Introduction
 Increasing rate of alcoholism and dementia
 Alcoholism
 Dementia
Physiological affects of alcoholism on brain
Physiological affect of Alzheimer’s
Studies between dementia and alcohol consumption
 Conclusion</li></li></ul><li>Introduction<br />Hypothesis: Alcoholism increases the risk of dementia<br />Alcoholism and ...
Things to Consider<br />Alcohol abuse impairs cognitive ability and damages the brain through atrophy<br />Dementia is a n...
Alcoholism and Dementia Statistics<br />Alcoholism<br />Estimated 6.6 million children live in households with at least on...
ALCOHOLISM<br /><ul><li>Alcoholism is considered a disease of its own. For the past 200 years the idea of alcoholism being...
 Alcoholism is characterized by abnormal alcohol-seeking behavior and impaired control over drinking (Gordis, 1995).
 Alcoholic dementia is characterized by a global loss of intellectual abilities (Gordis, 1995)</li></li></ul><li>DEMENTIA<...
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Alocholism And Dementia, Are They Related

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A preentation researching whether long term alcohol abuse can lead to cognitive degerative disease.

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Alocholism And Dementia, Are They Related

  1. 1. Alcoholism and Dementia:Is there a relation?<br />By Danny Gallegos<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3. Agenda<br /><ul><li> Introduction
  4. 4. Increasing rate of alcoholism and dementia
  5. 5. Alcoholism
  6. 6. Dementia
  7. 7. Physiological affects of alcoholism on brain
  8. 8. Physiological affect of Alzheimer’s
  9. 9. Studies between dementia and alcohol consumption
  10. 10. Conclusion</li></li></ul><li>Introduction<br />Hypothesis: Alcoholism increases the risk of dementia<br />Alcoholism and dementia impact most of our lives<br />I have a personal interest in the two aspects of this topic<br />
  11. 11. Things to Consider<br />Alcohol abuse impairs cognitive ability and damages the brain through atrophy<br />Dementia is a neurodegenerative cognitive disorder <br />It is logical to question if alcoholism increases the risk of developing dementia<br />An understanding of any correlation can help with treatment and prevention of dementia<br />
  12. 12.
  13. 13. Alcoholism and Dementia Statistics<br />Alcoholism<br />Estimated 6.6 million children live in households with at least one alcoholic parent<br />53% of Americans report a close relative is an alcoholic<br />Alcoholism-Statistics.com<br />Dementia<br />Estimated 24 million people world wide have some form of dementia<br />More than 5 million Americans suffer from Alzheimer’s today<br />Dementia is the worlds fastest growing diseases<br />Disabled-world.com<br />
  14. 14.
  15. 15. ALCOHOLISM<br /><ul><li>Alcoholism is considered a disease of its own. For the past 200 years the idea of alcoholism being a disease has been developed, but not without controversy (Jaffe 1993).
  16. 16. Alcoholism is characterized by abnormal alcohol-seeking behavior and impaired control over drinking (Gordis, 1995).
  17. 17. Alcoholic dementia is characterized by a global loss of intellectual abilities (Gordis, 1995)</li></li></ul><li>DEMENTIA<br />The term “dementia” denotes any condition characterized by severe global intellectual impairment, including loss of memory functions and abstract thinking, personality changes, disruption of social skills, and other impairments of higher brain functions (Eberling & Jaquist, 1995).<br />Doctors diagnose dementia only if two or more brain functions - such as memory, language skills, perception, or cognitive skills including reasoning and judgment - are significantly impaired without loss of consciousness. (Dementia, n.d.). <br />
  18. 18. PHYSIOLOGICAL AFFECTS OF ALCOHOLISM<br />
  19. 19. PHYSIOLGICAL AFFECTS OF ALZHEIMERS<br />
  20. 20. Physiological comparison between an Alcohol atrophy brain and Alzheimer’s disease brain<br />
  21. 21. LITERATURE FINDINGS<br />Based on clinical research studies between 22% to 29% of individuals with dementia were found to be heavy drinkers or alcoholics and 9% to 23% of elderly alcoholics in alcoholism treatment were found to also have dementia (FCA: Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome, n.d.). <br />The research suggests that there was a significantly decreased risk of developing any form of dementia diseases associated with light to moderate drinkers. The research also showed that heavy alcohol drinkers and non alcohol drinkers actually developed dementia diseases at the same rates (Anstey, Mack, & Cherbuin, 2009). <br />
  22. 22. LITERATURE FINDINGS CONT.<br />Compared to non drinkers, the moderate consumption of alcohol lowered the risk of a poor CASI score by 22% to 40% (Galanis et al., 2000).<br />Men who consumed more than 4 drinks per day had considerably lower scores and increased the risk of poor cognitive abilities (Galanis et al., 2000).<br />
  23. 23. CONCLUSION<br />The causes of brain atrophy differed from alcohol abuse and dementia and the atrophy even halted with the abstinence of alcohol (Acuff, 2010). <br />Studies suggest that light to moderate alcohol consumptions may even decrease the risk of developing any dementia diseases. <br />Those same studies also suggest a similar rate of developing dementia diseases between non alcohol drinkers and heavy alcoholic consumption<br />
  24. 24. REFERENCES<br />Acuff, K. (2010, September 11). Alcoholism & Alzheimer's | LIVESTRONG.COM. LIVESTRONG.COM - Health, Fitness, Lifestyle | LIVESTRONG.COM. Retrieved from http://www.livestrong.com/article/240205-alcoholism-alzheimers/ <br />Anstey, K. J., Mack, H. A., & Cherbuin, N. (2009). Alcohol Consumption as a Risk Factor for Dementia and Cognitive Decline: Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 17(7), 542-556. Retrieved from Ebsco.<br />Dementia. (n.d.). Medicinenet.com. Retrieved from http://www.medicinenet.com/dementia/article.htm <br />Eberling, J. L., & Jaquist, W. J. (1995). Dementia and its causes. Alcohol Health and Research World., 19(4), 280-281. Retrieved from Ebsco. <br />FCA: Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome. (n.d.). Family Caregiver Alliance. Retrieved from http://www.caregiver.org/caregiver/jsp/content_node.jsp?nodeid=580 <br />Galanis, D. J., Joseph, C., Masaki, K. H., Petrovich, H., Ross, G. W., & White, L. (2000). A Longitudinal Study of Drinking and Cognitive Performance in Elderly Japanese American Men. American jopurnal of Public Health, 90(8), 1254-1259. <br />Gordis, E. (1995). THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON ALCOHOL ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM: PAST ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND FUTURE GOALS. ALCOHOL HEALTH & RESEARCH WORLD, Jan 1, 5-11. Retrieved from SIRS Knowledge. <br />Jaffe, J. H. (1993). The concept of dependence: Historical reflections. ALCOHOL HEALTH & RESEARCH WORLD, 17(3), 188-189. <br />Tyas, S. L. (2001). Alcohol Use and the Risk of Developing Alzheimer's Disease. National Institue of Alcohol abuse and Alcoholism, 25(4), 299. <br />
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