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India

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  • 6.Description: The Haro Hills are on the left and the Kas Hills are on the right. The Haro Hills are an “anticline,” which is an upwardly convex elongated fold of layered rocks. In this view, the anticline is distinctly ringed by an erosion resistant layer of sandstone. The east-west orientation of the anticline may relate to the crustal compression that has occurred during India’s northward movement toward, and collision with, Asia. In contrast, the largest of the Kas Hills appears to be a tilted (to the south) and faulted (on the north) block of layered rocks. Also seen here, the linear feature trending toward the southwest from the image center is an erosion-resistant “dike,” which is an igneous intrusion into older “host” rocks along a fault plane or other crack. These features are simple examples of how shaded topography can provide a direct input to geologic studies.
    Technology: Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth’s surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices.
    Other Info: On January 26, 2001, the Kachchh region in western India suffered the most deadly earthquake in India’s history. This shaded topography view of landforms northeast of the city of Bhuj depicts geologic structures that are of interest in the study the tectonic processes that may have led to that earthquake. However, preliminary field studies indicate that these structures are composed of Mesozoic rocks that are overlain by younger rocks showing little deformation. Thus these structures may be old, not actively growing, and not directly related to the recent earthquake. In this image, colors show the elevation as measured by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Colors range from green at the lowest elevations, through yellow and red, to purple at the highest elevations. Elevations here range from near sea level to about 300 meters (about 1000 feet). Shading has been added, with illumination from the north (image top).
    Size: 26.3 x 16.6 kilometers (16.3 x 10.3 miles) Location: 23.4 deg. North lat., 69.8 deg. East lon. Orientation: North toward the top Date Acquired: February 2000
  • Note: Rotated counter clockwise to fit in the frame
    8.Description: In the upper right-hand corner of the Aug.5 image, the swollen Brahmaputra River runs east to west through the Indian state of Assam. Normally, the river and its tributaries would resemble a tangle of thin lines. Moving to the upper left-hand corner, flooding can be seen along the Ganges River in the state of Bihar, India
    Technology: Series of true- and false-color images acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Terra spacecraft begins on August 5, 2002, and shows the extent of this flooding.
    Other Info: Both of these rivers flow into Bangladesh along with many others from India and Nepal. Heavy monsoon rains from all across the region have inundated the small country with water this year. Floodwaters have all but covered northeastern Bangladesh, which is usually dry. The Jamuna River, which runs down the center of the country off of the Brahmaputra River, now resembles a narrow lake. Millions of dollars in crops have been destroyed and thousands of people have been left stranded in their villages or on rafts. Forecasters are warning that flooding could get worse.In the false-color images, land is green or orange, and water is dark blue to black. Clouds appear pink, red and white.Over the next few months, the flood waters receded slowly. Note that the standing water in eastern Bangladesh was still widespread in November.
  • Note : Rotated counter clockwise to fit in the frame
    11.Description: The post-monsoon images, taken in October, show vast regions of standing water over what is otherwise desert land as can be seen in the pre-monsoon image taken on May 10, 2003. September 30 marked the end of the monsoon season, which runs from July through September. Normally a salt clay desert covering some 10,800 square miles, the Rann of Hutch becomes a salt marsh during the annual rains. Nestled between the Gulf of Kutch in India's northwestern state of Gujarat and the mouth of the Indus River in southern Pakistan, the region is home to Asia.s last herds of wild asses. Patches of high ground seen in the image become a refuge for wildlife during the wet season.
    Technology: Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)
    Other Info: The heavy rains of India's summer monsoon drenched the land, filling lakes and rivers. These Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images contrast the wet and the dry seasons in the Rann of Kutch in northwestern India.
  • Note : Rotated counter clockwise to fit in the frame.
    59.Description: Depicts Northeast India (center, left, and bottom), Nepal (above India), Southern China (above Nepal), and Bangladesh (right edge). A number of fires (red dots) can be seen in India's interior and North and East borders. It is also possible to see the Indian city of Calcutta in the higher-resolution images (bottom right near the delta).
    Technology True-color MODIS image
  • 70.Description: These values are associated with industrial activity in the region just south of the Himalayan Mountains. Notice that to the north, the Himalayas are characterized by low values (blue pixels).
    Technology MOPITT observed high levels of carbon monoxide (red and yellow pixels) over the Indian sub-continent during March.
  • Note : Rotated counter clockwise to fit in the frame.
    94.Description:
    The heavy rains of India's summer monsoon drenched the land, filling lakes and rivers The post-monsoon images, taken in October, show vast regions of standing water over what is otherwise desert land as can be seen in the pre-monsoon image taken on May 10, 2003. September 30 marked the end of the monsoon season, which runs from July through September. Normally a salt clay desert covering some 10,800 square miles, the Rann of Hutch becomes a salt marsh during the annual rains. Nestled between the Gulf of Kutch in India's northwestern state of Gujarat and the mouth of the Indus River in southern Pakistan, the region is home to Asia.s last herds of wild asses. Patches of high ground seen in the image become a refuge for wildlife during the wet season.
    Technology: These Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images contrast the wet and the dry seasons in the Rann of Kutch in northwestern India
  • 101.Description: Over the years, astronauts have used various viewing angles and lenses to capture the many faces of Everest. Differing seasons and illumination allow for very different, but always spectacular perspectives. The current astronauts on the International Space Station obtained this view of Mt. Everest in late November 2003.
    Technology Image was taken from the International Space Station with a Kodak DCS760 digital camera equipped with an 400mm lens. Image is provided by the Earth Observations Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. The International Space Station Program supports the laboratory to help astronauts take pictures of Earth that will be of the greatest value to scientists and the public, and to make those images freely available on the Internet.
  • Transcript

    • 1. India Images
    • 2. HARO AND KAS HILLS, INDIA
    • 3. Carbon Monoxide over Northern India MOPITT Observation around March 2000
    • 4. The Many Faces of Mount Everest