Chapter 12
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,410
On Slideshare
1,380
From Embeds
30
Number of Embeds
3

Actions

Shares
Downloads
128
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 30

http://padmashreegroup.blogspot.com 17
http://padmashreegroup.blogspot.in 11
https://www.linkedin.com 2

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2. P ART V D IRECTING THE S ALES T EAM
  • 3. C HAPTER 12 M OTIVATING S ALESPEOPLE T OWARD H IGH P ERFORMANCE
  • 4.
    • That the definition of motivation includes the motivational mix and all of its various elements.
    • The powerful motivating influence of a high-performance sales culture.
    • The importance of realizing that salespeople have basic needs that, when met are strongly motivating.
    • The model for a salesperson’s behavior.
    • The benefit of knowing salespeople personally.
    • That not every member of a sales force can be motivated.
    L EARNING O BJECTIVES An enthusiastic and motivated sales force is the best possible foundation for successful achievement of sales objectives. This chapter should help you understand:
  • 5. M OTIVATION
      • Understand what motivation is all about.
      • Develop a high-performance sales culture.
      • Know salespeople’s basic needs.
      • Realize that salespeople want to know what is in it for them.
    The components of a motivational system:
  • 6.
      • Get to know the personal side of salespersons.
      • Always remember that motivational coaching is needed for high performance.
      • Be realistic about motivating salespeople.
    The components of a motivational system: continued
  • 7. U NDERSTAND W HAT M OTIVATION I S A LL A BOUT
      • What arouses salespeople’s behavior?
      • What influences the intensity of the behavioral arousal?
      • What directs the person’s behavior?
      • How is this behavior maintained over time?
    In any discussion about the motivation of salespeople, the following four questions need to be considered:
  • 8. Motivation refers to the arousal, intensity, direction, and persistence of effort directed toward job tasks over a period of time.
  • 9. T HE S ALES M OTIVATIONAL M IX Motivational Mix – The arousal, intensity, direction, and persistence of people’s behavior. Extrinsic Outcomes – Rewards obtained from individuals’ environment. Intrinsic Outcomes – Occur purely from the performance of the task itself.
  • 10. TABLE 12.1 THE SEVEN COMPONENTS OF THE SALES MOTIVATIONAL MIX AND EXAMPLES OF EACH MOTIVATIONAL METHOD
  • 11. D EVELOP A S ALES C ULTURE Sales culture refers to a set of key values, ideas, beliefs, attitudes, customs, and other capabilities and habits shared or acquired as a member of the sales group.
  • 12.
      • Ceremonies and Rites
    I MPLEMENTATION OF A S ALES C ULTURE
  • 13. Ceremonies and rites are the elaborate, planned activities that make up a special event and often are conducted for the benefit of an audience.
  • 14.
      • Ceremonies and Rites
      • Stories
    I MPLEMENTATION OF A S ALES C ULTURE
  • 15. Stories are narratives based on true events that are frequently shared among salespeople and told to new sales reps to inform them about the organization.
  • 16.
      • Ceremonies and Rites
      • Stories
      • Symbols
    I MPLEMENTATION OF A S ALES C ULTURE
  • 17. A symbol is one thing that represents another thing.
  • 18.
      • Ceremonies and Rites
      • Stories
      • Symbols
      • Language
    I MPLEMENTATION OF A S ALES C ULTURE
  • 19. Many companies use a specific saying, slogan, metaphor, or other language form to convey special meaning to employees.
  • 20. TABLE 12.2 EXAMPLES OF CULTURAL VALUES AND BELIEFS AND THEIR IMPLEMENTATION WITHIN THE SALES FORCE
  • 21. W HAT’S IN I T FOR M E? Expectancy theory is based on the assumption that salespeople have expectancies about what they should receive from their employer as a result of their work efforts.
  • 22. Expectancy is the salesperson’s estimate of the probability that expending a given amount of effort on a task will lead to an improved level of performance on some dimension. W HAT I S THE P ROBABILITY OF S UCCESS?
  • 23. FIGURE 12.1 FOUR QUESTIONS SALESPEOPLE ASK TO DETERMINE HOW MUCH EFFORT THEY WILL DEVOTE TO THEIR JOBS. Motivation to Work “ What Is the Probability of Success?” Performance Level “ Will I Be Rewarded for Success?” Rewards Intrinsic Extrinsic “ Are the Rewards Worth It?” Equity Determination Inputs vs. Outputs “ Are the Rewards Fair?” Satisfaction Intrinsic Extrinsic Feedback
  • 24. The salesperson’s estimate of the probability that achieving an improved level of performance dimension will lead to increased attainment of a particular reward or outcome may be defined as instrumentality. W ILL I B E R EWARDED FOR S UCCESS?
  • 25. Valence for rewards refers to the value the salesperson places on the reward. A RE THE R EWARDS W ORTH I T?
  • 26. Managerial Implications of Expectancy Theory
      • 1. Increase expectancies.
      • 2. Make performance instrumental toward positive outcomes.
      • 3. Identify positively valent outcomes.
  • 27. If inequity is perceived, the salesperson may be motivated to restore equity using one of four methods. A RE THE R EWARDS F AIR?
      • First, the salesperson may increase or decrease the level of input that may, in turn, influence outcomes.
      • Second, the salesperson could distort the facts by convincing himself or herself that equity really does exist even though it may not.
  • 28. If inequity is perceived, the salesperson may be motivated to restore equity using one of four methods. continued
      • Third, the salesperson could choose another salesperson with whom to compare the ratio of outcomes to inputs.
      • Fourth, the salesperson could influence other salespeople to decrease the amount of effort they are putting into their job.
  • 29. H OW TO F ACILITATE E QUITY
      • 1. Sales performance did not increase.
      • 2. No important rewards were given for meeting quota.
      • 3. The rewards given for meeting quota were not worth the extra work.
      • 4. Treatment was not fair because one person’s rewards were the same as another’s who worked harder.
    An individual will tend to reduce the level of effort if one of these situations is encountered.
  • 30. Job Satisfaction and Work Attitudes Job satisfaction refers to feelings toward the job.
    • Job dissatisfaction, aggregated across many individuals, creates a sales force that is more likely to exhibit:
      • 1. Higher turnover.
      • 2. Higher absenteeism.
      • 3. Lower corporate citizenship.
      • 4. More grievances and lawsuits.
      • 5. Stealing, sabotage, and vandalism.
      • 6. Poorer mental and physical health.
  • 31. Quality of Work Life
      • Categories:
      • 1. Adequate and fair compensation.
      • 2. A safe and healthy environment.
      • 3. Jobs that develop human capacities.
      • 4. A chance for personal growth and security.
      • 5. A social environment that fosters personal identity, freedom from prejudice, a sense of community, and upward mobility.
  • 32. Quality of Work Life continued
      • 6. Constitutionalism, or the rights of personal privacy, dissent, and due process.
      • 7. A work role that minimizes infringement on personal leisure and family needs.
      • 8. Socially responsible organizational actions.
  • 33. The term productivity as applied by QWL advocates means much more than each person’s quantity of work output.
    • It also includes:
      • Levels of turnover
      • Absenteeism
      • Accidents
      • Thefts
      • Sabotage
      • Creativity
      • Innovation
      • Quality of work
  • 34. Turnover refers to someone leaving their present job. Voluntary Turnover
  • 35. FIGURE 12.2 CLASSIFICATION OF TURNOVER
  • 36. FIGURE 12.3 A SALESPERSON’S BEHAVIORAL MODEL HELPS ILLUSTRATE MOTIVATIONAL PROCESS
  • 37. G ET TO KNOW THE PERSONAL SIDE OF SALESPERSONS! U NDERSTAND THE S ALESPERSON’S M OTIVATIONAL B EHAVIOR
  • 38. M ATCH P EOPLE’S M OTIVES WITH I NCENTIVES T HEY V ALUE Incentives are aspects of the environment that appeal to the salesperson’s motives and have enough worth to motivate purposeful behavior to obtain them.
  • 39. Incentives that motivate people to do their best are high motivators.
    • Examples of high motivators:
      • Rewards for successes
      • Recognition for achievement
      • Job advancement
      • Freedom to manage oneself
      • Training and sales meetings
      • Leadership
      • Performance evaluation
      • Incentive compensation plans
  • 40. Incentives that motivate little or not at all or, if incentives are absent, that demotivate are low motivators.
    • Examples of low motivators:
      • Company policy and procedures
      • Fringe benefits
      • Retirement programs
      • More supervision
  • 41. Sales managers would do well to explore different aspects of incentives. Several things to consider are:
      • Some salespeople like material incentives versus nonmaterial incentives.
      • The attraction to short-range incentives versus long-range incentives.
      • Positive incentives in most instances motivate more successfully than negative incentives.
  • 42. Motivate the Team
    • Six keys to managing a successful incentive program:
      • Identify the business goal you hope to target.
      • Communicate the business needs to your salespeople.
      • Listen to your salespeople.
      • Make sure the goals are reachable.
      • Don’t repeat the same programs over and over.
      • Don’t try to do everything at once.
  • 43. M OTIVATIONAL C OACHING IS N EEDED FOR H IGH- P ERFORMANCE R ESULTS SALESPEOPLE HAVE BOUNDARY POSITIONS Salespeople are involved in meeting both the needs of their customers and the needs of their company.
  • 44. Salespeople experience role ambiguity when they do not possess the information necessary to adequately perform their jobs. Salespeople experience role conflict when conflicting, inconsistent, or incompatible job demands occur from two or more people.
  • 45. FIGURE 12.4 ROLE PERCEPTIONS INFLUENCE PERFORMANCE
  • 46. Motivational TECHNIQUES
        • T each teamwork
        • E mpower
        • C ommunicate
        • H ear
        • N otice
        • I nitiate integrity
        • Q uery
        • U nify
        • E xalt
        • S et standards
  • 47. T HE B OTTOM L INE To achieve company and individual objectives, salespeople need to be motivated. The first component involves an understanding of the motivational concept. The second component in a motivational program is a high-performance sales culture. Salespeople have basic needs that influence behavior and lead to goal attainment.
  • 48. T HE B OTTOM L INE A realization that salespeople want to know “what’s in it for them” is the fourth component. Knowing the theory of motivation is not enough. Proper motivational coaching is the sixth component of the motivational program. Being realistic about motivating salespeople is the final part of the program.