2016 Connected Care and the Patient Experience

14,840 views

Published on

Annual survey of 1,000 Americans reveals increased dissatisfaction with data availability and innovation, even though the technology exists today for a safer, more convenient and connected healthcare experience.

Published in: Healthcare

2016 Connected Care and the Patient Experience

  1. 1. 2016 Connected Care and the Patient Experience Annual survey of 1,000 Americans reveals increased dissatisfaction with data availability and innovation, even though the technology exists today for a safer, more convenient and connected healthcare experience.
  2. 2. Most patients believe that their medical information should be electronically stored and shared in one central location. KEY FINDING 1:
  3. 3. Patients want someone to have centralized access to their medical information, and believe their doctors are wasting time without it. of patients believe someone should have complete access to their medical records. 98% feel doctors would save time if their patients’ medication history was in one location. 93%
  4. 4. For patients, it’s not just about convenience. It’s about avoiding medical errors. 9 in 10 patients believe that their doctor would be less likely to prescribe the wrong medication if they had more complete information.
  5. 5. Patients feel that they’re at risk when their doctors don’t have access to their medical records. 9 in 10 patients believe that lives are at stake when their doctors don’t have their complete medication history.
  6. 6. Most patients are willing to share more general information about their health. 77% will share physical information. 51% will share mental health information. 69% will share insurance information.
  7. 7. The lack of a central electronic location for health records forces patients to take matters into their own hands. 58% of patients have attempted to compile their own medical history.
  8. 8. Patients are increasingly unhappy with the state of health data access and sharing, whether at the doctor’s office or the pharmacy. KEY FINDING 2:
  9. 9. Patients are spending more time relaying their medical history than they think they should. Patients report an average of 8 minutes spent on paperwork plus 8 minutes spent verbally sharing their medical history per doctor’s visit. 80% of patients feel they should fill out paperwork at the doctor’s office only on their first visit.
  10. 10. And the effort? It’s just too much. 54% say renewing a driver’s license requires less paperwork. 37% say opening a bank account requires less paperwork. 32% say applying for a marriage license requires less paperwork.
  11. 11. And the prescription process? It’s a pain point, especially when there’s paper involved. 4 in 10 patients are less likely to visit a doctor who does not have the ability to process a prescription electronically.
  12. 12. Unpleasant surprises at the pharmacy make the experience worse for patients. of patients have been told at the pharmacy that they need to wait due to prior authorization. 35% of patients are surprised to learn the cost of their medication at the pharmacy. 42% of patients are frustrated by having to talk with pharmacists about what their insurance will cover. 45%
  13. 13. More patients want new and innovative ways to receive care and get prescriptions. KEY FINDING 3:
  14. 14. More than just a nice-to-have, patients are expecting remote care settings—and soon. 52% of patients expect doctors to offer remote visits. 36% of patients believe that most doctor appointments will be remote in the next 10 years.
  15. 15. Patients want the flexibility of telehealth or remote care settings when it comes to prescriptions, too. Would trust a prescription from a remote doctor Feel getting a prescription remotely would be easier than in person 64% Feel getting a prescription remotely would be faster than in person 70% 64%
  16. 16. The technology to share patient health information exists today, but patient satisfaction continues to suffer because: • Patients expect their doctor to have complete access to their medical records, but most still feel too heavily relied upon to recite it themselves. • As a result, the healthcare consumer experience is largely unsatisfactory. • The healthcare system must adapt to meet the consumer demand for innovative care settings like telehealth. SUMMARY

×