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Social and Community Value of Football
 

Social and Community Value of Football

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In this session, Dr Adam Brown & Adrian Ashton follow on from the launch in the opening session, this workshop will take a more in depth look at the methodology, its case studies and its ...

In this session, Dr Adam Brown & Adrian Ashton follow on from the launch in the opening session, this workshop will take a more in depth look at the methodology, its case studies and its recommendations. For more on the report go to www.supporters-direct.org or download it via this Slideshare account.

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    Social and Community Value of Football Social and Community Value of Football Presentation Transcript

    • Supporters Direct Conference 2010 Workshop The Social and Community Value of Football A Supporters Direct Research Project, by Substance Dr. Adam Brown
    • Overview
      • Commissioned by SD summer 2008 from Substance
      • To understand more about the social and community value of football clubs .
      • To generate evidence about the relationship of different ownership structures to social impacts through surveys and case studies.
      • To provide evidence to support the work of SD – how does supporter or community ownership relate to social value?
      • To understand the regulatory framework in which social value might be assessed.
    • Three Phases
      • Phase One - Secondary Research/Literature Review and Working Papers on approaches to social value
      • Phase Two - Primary Research – Survey and Case Studies
      • - Qualitative Survey of 10 clubs, all levels
      • - In depth case studies of 4 clubs
      • - Social Accounting exercise
      • Phase Three – Dissemination
      • - Final Report
      • - Summary Report of key findings and recommendations
    • Approach to Research
      • Interim Report outlined:
        • The range of possible approaches
        • The approach to be taken in primary research
      • Our approach:
        • Qualitative survey of executives of ten clubs, all levels of football
        • Case study of four clubs: 2 fan-owned, 2 non-fan-owned
        • Social Accounting club bundle (Adrian Ashton)
        • Regulatory Framework research and paper (M.James and S.Miettinen)
    • Approach to Research (interviews)
      • Interview Survey
        • Ten Clubs: Premier League to Step 7
        • Executive Officer interviewed, ten areas of inquiry, responses analysed and coded:
        • Background to the club and ownership structure
        • Perceived advantages/disadvantages of ownership structure
        • Identified good/bad practice in generating social value
        • Identified barriers to developing social value
        • Most important stakeholders
        • Relationships with local authorities
        • Existence of local purchasing, business or staffing policies
        • Attitude towards and involvement with supporters
        • Innovative ticketing policies
        • Nature of community outreach organisation and work
    • Approach to Research (case studies)
        • In-depth qualitative semi-structured interviews with key personnel.
        • Qualitative and quantitative evidence from external stakeholders.
        • Survey of supporters
        • Quantitative assessment of community departments’ work.
        • Employment of a ‘Social Accounting Club Bundle’.
        • Club A Limited company model Football League club, with previous Premier League experience.
        • Club B Limited company model Football League club.
        • Club C Supporter-owned Football League club.
        • Club D Supporter-owned Non-League club.
    • Key Findings – Overall
      • Little evidence of culture or practice in football evidencing and reporting social value:
        • Not part of the reporting or regulation of the game
        • Not part of the business practice of clubs as it is in other sectors
        • Absence of data, openness, even where this would be fairly easy
        • This despite the benefits for football of doing so and football’s rhetoric about its key role in communities
      • Clubs themselves play important roles within communities and to a range of stakeholders, but need to:
        • Identify stakeholders
        • Conduct research with internal and external stakeholders
        • Work with local authorities who are key partners
      • Chronic instability and financial strife rampant. This undermines football’s ability to deliver social value
    • Key Findings – Fans
        • Fans identified as key stakeholders by all executives but only included within ownership in some examples
      • ‘ What has the ownership of the club
      • got to do with community?’ (Club B Executive)
        • Recognise clubs are a structuring part of fans lives, with significant social value
        • ‘ I probably know 4-500 people from football, faces to say hello to, and I could name about 200. That’s just been built up through years, through travelling to games and being involved in [the independent supporters’ association and trust]. It’s surprising how it grows. It becomes your community in itself.’
    • The Social Value to Fans
    • Stakeholder Relations
      • Horizontal integration of community vital to realising social value:
          • ‘ Instead of just saying “we’re a community club”, let’s be a community club. I think there’s a huge difference. A lot of clubs say they are a community club, claiming they are rooted in the community… As if that’s enough.’ (FL club, Club C))
        • Real Business Advantages – e.g. relations with local authorities:
          • ‘ When I first got involved with the club, I was really positively surprised that it wasn’t just men over a certain age…When you look at the terraces, it really is a community-owned club and I wasn’t expecting that. It’s all very well saying you are a community club, but they don’t just say it, they live it as well.’ (local authority rep, Club D)
          • Our status as a supporters’ trust was vital for support from the council, and it will be going forwards. If we sold the club to a wealthy individual who wanted a stadium, it would be a harder sell to get the council backing. We wouldn’t be in this position with the new stadium if we weren’t supporter-owned – and there’s all sorts of spin offs from that.’ (Club C)
    • The Value to Local Communities
    • Key Findings - Ownership
      • Some notable differences for supporter or community owned clubs
        • Not a given that fan owned deliver greater social value and good (and bad!) practice evident at clubs of all types
        • But: more inclusive of wider range of stakeholders as clubs especially in terms of participation in running the club
        • Better relationships and closer shared agendas with local authorities and stronger local partnerships
        • More open and greater range of ad hoc relations with localities
        • Key advantages when developing facilities
        • Better attitudes to supporters - stakeholders not ‘customers’
    • Key Findings – Good Practice
      • Inclusion of fans in ownership = volunteer labour, self policing
      • Volunteer time as ‘debt’ owed to Trust
      • Sharing facilities with community department
      • Developing ad hoc relations – park events and fetes, ‘out and about’
      • Mixed interests and golden shares
      • Local authority powers
      • Trust supporting youth/community development through raising finance
      • Football League Trust - environmental policy/impact reporting
    • Key Findings – Regulation
      • FA, PL and FL : no requirements to undertake social accounting or to report social and environmental impacts
      • PL and FL come closest: customer charter (PL); environmental impact of community schemes (FLT)
      • UK government : no requirement beyond Company Law (few clubs with company community Objects )
      • EU – no requirement; misunderstanding of rhetoric and reality in EC sports rulings
    • Regulation - Options
      • i) Potential for emergent EU sports policy under Lisbon Treaty – for further investigation, questionable legality of sport-specific laws
      • ii) Legislation at national level – most straightforward, but unlikely
      • iii) Football’s federations bodies to require auditing – e.g. UEFA Licensing, league reporting requirements
      • iv) Clubs to adopt Objectives of clubs and report in Annual Reports - SD to draft model rules; bottom up approach.
    • Recommendations (i)
      • For Supporters Direct and Supporters’ Trusts
        • Use leading role to disseminate and lobby for change
        • Report SD’s own impacts
        • Promote broader ownership as a mans of delivering social value
        • Opportunities for trust education, work and involvement
      • For Football – change culture and practice
        • Clubs to make clear community Objectives and to evidence and report social and environmental impacts
        • Authorities to require reporting of social and environmental performance and recognise
        • Recognise the added social value of broader based ownership
        • Football to recognise the significant opportunities in doing this
    • Recommendations (ii)
      • For government
        • All public authorities: To give preferential treatment to football only where it can demonstrate the ‘public good’
        • Local Govt : Encourage wider community involvement in ownership, use of powers to do this (eg facilities, planning etc.)
        • National Govt : Recognise added social value of broader ownership and encourage this (e.g. when clubs in administration)
        • European Govt : To generate Europe-wide evidence of the positive social value of sport through evidence and reporting of its impact and base policies affecting sports on this
    • Substance 3 rd Floor Fourways House Hilton St Manchester M1 2EJ 0161 244 5418 www.substance.coop [email_address] http://valuefootball.substance.coop
    • The Social Value of Football - now we know how to measure it, the why, how and “yeah but...”s Adrian Ashton www.adrianashton.co.uk
    • What’s in it for you?
      • Better reporting
      • Better management information
      • Identify areas of excellence
      • PR...
      Adrian Ashton
    • What could kill it before you start?
      • Time
      • Perceived (ir)relevance
      • Fear...
      • Too much information needed that we don’t have and will be too difficult to capture
      Adrian Ashton
    • What could kill it before you start?
      • Time
        • Pick and choose indicators
        • Potentially 2 days work
      • Perceived (ir)relevance
        • Changing legislation
        • Strengthen arguments and case for support
      • Fear
        • Don’t have to tell everyone about everything you ‘uncover’...
      Adrian Ashton
    • What about the information needed?
      • Measures designed to use information that (in theory) club should already be capturing:
        • Invoice registers
        • Staffing records
        • Policies
        • Minutes of meetings
        • Details of Trust members/ticket sales
        • Records of community activity
    • What you need to get started
      • Other clubs sharing experiences
      • Appendices to research report
        • http:// valuefootball.substance.coop /
      • SROI Network and SAN
        • www.sroi-uk.org
        • www.socialauditnetwork.org.uk
      Adrian Ashton
    • The Social Value of Football - now we know how to measure it, the why, how and “yeah but...”s Adrian Ashton www.adrianashton.co.uk
    • What’s in it for you?
      • Better reporting
      • Better management information
      • Identify areas of excellence
      • PR...
      Adrian Ashton
    • What could kill it before you start?
      • Time
      • Perceived (ir)relevance
      • Fear...
      • Too much information needed that we don’t have and will be too difficult to capture
      Adrian Ashton
    • What could kill it before you start?
      • Time
        • Pick and choose indicators
        • Potentially 2 days work
      • Perceived (ir)relevance
        • Changing legislation
        • Strengthen arguments and case for support
      • Fear
        • Don’t have to tell everyone about everything you ‘uncover’...
      Adrian Ashton
    • What about the information needed?
      • Measures designed to use information that (in theory) club should already be capturing:
        • Invoice registers
        • Staffing records
        • Policies
        • Minutes of meetings
        • Details of Trust members/ticket sales
        • Records of community activity
    • What you need to get started
      • Other clubs sharing experiences
      • Appendices to research report
        • http://valuefootball.substance.coop/
      • SROI Network and SAN
        • www.sroi-uk.org
        • www.socialauditnetwork.org.uk
      Adrian Ashton
      • Social Value of Football is demonstrated in a number of ways
      • Social Value can be hindered by financial instability
      • Clubs are more than corporate entities….. should be reflected in their governance by the inclusion of a key stakeholder – the supporter!