Modern Latin America<br />By <br />Kyle Fluck<br />History 141<br />
Britain and Latin America<br />Independence from the Spanish and Portuguese marked the entrance of British influence, Brit...
Britain and Latin America<br />	The British government gave their support to the royal Portuguese family in return for tra...
Britain and Latin America<br />Between the years of 1870 and 1914 Britain's focus and interest in Latin America reached it...
Latin America<br />Over time the power of the caudillos was given to elected civilian presidents which led to more powerfu...
Latin America<br />The economic growth led to the cities to also grow and the middle and working class to prosper which ma...
Latin America: Mexico<br />The four Mexico's consist of a a northern region, central Mexico, isthmus region, and the “New ...
Latin America: Venezuela<br />In the 1950’s the development of oil in Venezuela boosted it into the spotlight of the “firs...
Latin America: Brazil<br />Brazil which is one of South Americas most stable countries borders every country except Chile ...
Jorge Luis Borges<br />Borges was an internationally renowned poet and writer from Argentina, his poems and stories consis...
Oscar Niemeyer<br />From spacious, curved, out of this world looking buildings comes one of the greatest architectural min...
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Modern latin america

  1. 1. Modern Latin America<br />By <br />Kyle Fluck<br />History 141<br />
  2. 2. Britain and Latin America<br />Independence from the Spanish and Portuguese marked the entrance of British influence, Britain saw the end of the Latin American wars of independence as their opportunity to advance many different aspects of their empire and also control the silver mines in Peru and Mexico. <br />It took 200 years to finally accomplish independence, Britain's position in Latin America would guarantee economic development and a steady and secure government as well as open the door for foreign trade. <br />
  3. 3. Britain and Latin America<br /> The British government gave their support to the royal Portuguese family in return for trading privileges. <br /> Unfortunately with the mining companies failing to produce and the saturation of Latin American markets the government loans that had been contracted in London started defaulting. <br /> To solve their problems the Latin American governments instituted a system of “Free Trade” which in turn gave the market and merchants the opportunity to trade without the influence of foreign governments, this boosted their exports and gave the government the ability to renegotiate the loans. <br />
  4. 4. Britain and Latin America<br />Between the years of 1870 and 1914 Britain's focus and interest in Latin America reached its high. <br />Due to World war one and the United States ability to take control of Latin America it took away Europe's power and turned their international creditor status to that of a debtor. <br />The independence from Britain led to large disparities in wealth and social status, this resulted in the development of many networks of internal trade and migration. <br />The migrations and lack of a singular government led to many “new republics” led by the caudillos or military. <br />The several governments had very little money or reliability which led to instability, this instability was at its most extreme in countries like Mexico, Peru, and Bolivia, while Brazil and Chile continued to stay stable. <br />
  5. 5. Latin America<br />Over time the power of the caudillos was given to elected civilian presidents which led to more powerful and stable state governments. <br />The stability gave the many countries the ability to expand their trade and build their credit with European financial centers. <br />
  6. 6. Latin America<br />The economic growth led to the cities to also grow and the middle and working class to prosper which made the upper class feel uncomfortable. <br />It was the complete opposite when it came to the rural areas which living standards deteriorated while commercial and landowners say a boom in growth. <br />Many problems began to arise during World war one, the liberal governments based foreign trade and capital began to heat up and cause problems within the people.<br />In Mexico the people elected Lazaro Cardenas brought more stability, he gave more power to workers and peasants, and nationalized railroads and oil companies. <br />It was different in Argentina and Brazil, in Argentina the Concordancia used fraudulent elections to keep conservative politicians in power until the President Castillo was overthrown by a military coup. In Brazil a man by the name of Getulio Vargas led a revolt that instituted a authoritarian government. <br />
  7. 7. Latin America: Mexico<br />The four Mexico's consist of a a northern region, central Mexico, isthmus region, and the “New Maya” regions.<br />The North American free trade agreement was put in place to give free agricultural trade between America and Mexico has led to Mexico having more of a dependence on the U.S.<br />More than half of the Mexican population is poverty stricken and most are trying to make their way north to America, the reason for the amount of poverty in Mexico comes from it used to being one of the largest oil exporters (80%) in the world, they lost their status to international competition along with hundreds of thousands of jobs. <br />Latin America has many problems most spawning from the government, there is no secure social security system, the government is absent when it comes to unemployment and poverty. <br />Latin American governments are hoping to take advantage of their geography and countries assets and becoming a gateway for intercontinental globalization. <br />
  8. 8. Latin America: Venezuela<br />In the 1950’s the development of oil in Venezuela boosted it into the spotlight of the “first world” countries.<br />The president of Venezuela, Hugo Chavez, ultimately controlled and played the people of Venezuela and blinded them to the fact that their resources within their country belonged to them. <br />Chavez controls the government of Venezula which keeps him in power and uses his power to manipulate the people and other countries.<br />
  9. 9. Latin America: Brazil<br />Brazil which is one of South Americas most stable countries borders every country except Chile and Ecuador and takes up almost half of the South American continent.<br />Brazil’s government provides food, cash transfers, education credits, and power generators to reduce poverty in its third world lands. <br />They have an developmental strategy that complements their energy strategy which makes them the largest producer and exporter of ethanol and very valuable to the rest of the world. <br />
  10. 10. Jorge Luis Borges<br />Borges was an internationally renowned poet and writer from Argentina, his poems and stories consisted of philosophical and psychological themes.<br />His work mainly explored the fantastical side of reality and captured the imagination of people worldwide. <br />A collection of short stories by the name of “Ficciones” is considered Borges masterpiece. <br />
  11. 11. Oscar Niemeyer<br />From spacious, curved, out of this world looking buildings comes one of the greatest architectural minds in the world. <br />His name is Oscar Niemeyer, he comes from Brazil and works internationally designing some of the most eye popping buildings seen.<br />He is known for using the look and texture of reinforced concrete to design much of his buildings.<br />Today he is still working on architecture at the age of 102. <br />The man and his museum are shown to the right.<br />

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