Ijc presentation mar 18, 2013

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IJC Presentation by Mathew Child for RAP Open House event of March 18, 2013

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Ijc presentation mar 18, 2013

  1. 1. Green Community, Clean Waters Thunder Bay Remedial Action Plan Open House March 18, 2013 Matthew Child, Physical Scientist Great Lakes Regional Office International Joint CommissionMore than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters. 1
  2. 2. Overview  Context of Great Lakes Cleanup  Role of the International Joint Commission (IJC)  Great Lakes Areas of Concern  How does the experience in other AOCs inform activities in Thunder Bay?  Closing remarksMore than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters
  3. 3. An Era of Transboundary Pollution Impacts Cleveland The HamiltonOhio Water Ontario Steel &Works Plant, Iron Company,July 4, 1903 1900 Toronto, Ontario 1896More than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 3
  4. 4. Boundary Waters Treaty of 1909 “It is further agreed that the waters herein defined as boundary waters and waters flowing across the boundary shall not be polluted on either side to the injury of health or property on the other”.More than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 4
  5. 5. Transboundary Basins Columbia River Basin Souris Rainy River River Basin Basin Missisquoi Bay Lake Champlain Saint. Croix River Basin St. Mary - Milk River Basin Red River Basin The Great Lakes and WaterwaysOver a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 5
  6. 6. IJC’s Regulatory Role Power Plants Control WorksMore than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 6
  7. 7. References  IJC looks into issues as asked to by the governments of Canada and U.S.  IJC replies with an independent report and make recommendations to the governments on these issues that are often followed.  One of the first references regarding pollution of boundary waters and the final report was published in 1918More than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 7
  8. 8. 1960s Reference on Great Lakes Water Quality The Cuyahoga River on fire in 1969. Severe Eutrophication of Lake ErieMore than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 8
  9. 9. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement The purpose of the Agreement is “to restore and maintain the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the waters of the Great Lakes basin ecosystem" President Richard Nixon and Prime Minister EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson and Minister of Pierre Trudeau signing the Great Lakes Water Environment Peter Kent sign Agreement Protocol Quality Agreement (1972) (2012)More than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters
  10. 10. More than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 10
  11. 11. Beneficial Use Impairments (BUI) 1. Restrictions on Fish and Wildlife Consumption 2. Tainting of Fish and Wildlife Flavour 3. Degraded Fish and Wildlife Populations 4. Fish Tumours or Other Deformities 5. Bird or Animal Deformities or Reproductive Problems 6. Degradation of Benthos 7. Restrictions on Dredging Activities 8. Eutrophication or Undesirable Algae 9. Restrictions on Drinking Water Consumption or Taste and Odour Problems 10. Beach Closings 11. Degradation of Aesthetics 12. Added Costs to Agriculture or Industry 13. Degradation of Phytoplankton and Zooplankton Populations 14. Loss of Fish and Wildlife HabitatMore than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 11
  12. 12. Progress is Being Made! 5 Areas of Concern Delisted (Restored) 2 Areas of Concern in Recovery Examples of Progress:  Contaminant loads decreasing  Species recoveries – bald eagle, mayfly, native fishes (e.g., lake sturgeon, lake whitefish) More than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters
  13. 13. So what does all this mean for Thunder Bay ???More than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 13
  14. 14. You Are Not Alone !!! Most Canadian AOCs are struggling with impairments related to:  Contaminated sediments  Habitat  Stormwater …among othersMore than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 14
  15. 15. Contaminated Sediments BUIs that are Impaired or Require Further Assessment:  Degradation of Benthos (12 of 15 AOCs)  Restrictions to Fish Consumption (12 of 15 AOCs) Six AOCs have active sediment remediation processes underway. For example:  Peninsula Harbour – sediment capping complete  St. Clair River – preferred sediment management option will be selected in 2013  Hamilton Harbour – tendering and initiation of remedial works in 2013 More than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 15
  16. 16. Habitat BUI that is Impaired:  Loss of Fish and Wildlife Habitat (12 of 15 AOCs) Linkage to urban and rural non-point source pollution Take advantage of existing methods/protocols and mapping software to maximize investments Consider all AOC compartments:  Protection of headwater natural areas  Mid- and lower watershed infill naturalization  Shoreline softening and naturalization  Deep water habitat enhancementMore than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 16
  17. 17. Some Habitat Projects Shoreline restoration in the Detroit River AOC Headwater wetland construction in the Wheatley Harbour AOCMore than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 17
  18. 18. Stormwater BUIs that are Impaired or Require Further Assessment:  Beach advisories (8 of 15 AOCs)  Degradation of Plankton (6 of 15 AOCs)  Degradation of Aesthetics (9 of 15 AOCs) Local progress with sewage treatment plant upgrades (public and private), sewer separation, downspout disconnections Need for traditional methods to be supplemented with Low Impact Development (LID) approaches More than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 18
  19. 19. Some Stormwater Projects Green Roofs in the Metro Toronto AOC Retention Treatment Basin in the Detroit River AOCMore than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 19
  20. 20. Closing Remarks Partnerships are key  As broad and diverse as possible Process is important  Governance  Work planning Make the RAP relevant  Community based events and activities  Linkage to school programming Be persistent  Hold yourself and other accountable  Maximize funders’ investmentsMore than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 20
  21. 21. Thank Youchildm@windsor.ijc.org More than a century of cooperation protecting shared waters 21

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