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3 Reasons Not to Market Video Games Like Movies
3 Reasons Not to Market Video Games Like Movies
3 Reasons Not to Market Video Games Like Movies
3 Reasons Not to Market Video Games Like Movies
3 Reasons Not to Market Video Games Like Movies
3 Reasons Not to Market Video Games Like Movies
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3 Reasons Not to Market Video Games Like Movies

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Marketing video games like movies can be a mistake. Here's why. http://www.supercoolcreative Supercool Creative Agency specializes in big ideas, video, social media and interactive production for …

Marketing video games like movies can be a mistake. Here's why. http://www.supercoolcreative Supercool Creative Agency specializes in big ideas, video, social media and interactive production for brands and startups including Capcom, THQ, Atari, IBM, T-Mobile, Pizza Hut and Dickies

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  • 1. 3 Reasons Not to MarketVideo Games Like Movies…and some alternatives that might be better www.supercoolcreative.com
  • 2. 1. Videogames have a higher barrier to entry in both cost and perceived time commitment ▪ Advertising campaigns for movies are typically meant to entice and intrigue ▪ Consumers are willing to spend $8 and 2 hours of their lives upon seeing a dude with a gun in a poster ▪ Videogames cost $60 a pop and depending on the genre could take 10 hours or more to complete ▪ Consumers seek more information than a typical movie-style advertisement provides before making purchases
  • 3. 2. Movie-style advertisements often rely on the iconic value of their actors and directors to sell. ▪ Often consumers will see a movie based on the merits of the cast rather than finding out if it’s actually good ▪ A videogame title doesn’t quite have an equivalent ▪ Mainstream gamers don’t particularly follow which publisher or development team works on a project so it’s more difficult to leverage a team’s track record when advertising a game
  • 4. 3. The videogame industry lacks prominent publications that the mainstream audience trusts. ▪ Big names like Roger Ebert and the New York Times review movies, giving them mass-market exposure ▪ Videogame journalism hasn’t found an audience outside hardcore gamers ▪ As a result, it is not nearly as massive, influential or reliable
  • 5. ▪ Learn from Ubisoft’s “companion games” initiative▪ Try an ARG (e.g. Halo 3’s I Love Bees)▪ Release a making-of miniseries ahead of the game launch (e.g. Uncharted 2: Among Thieves) Good▪ Promote a developer run content blog (e.g. Super Smash Bros. Brawl Dojo) Alternatives▪ Publish a flashy lore codex (e.g. Metal Gear Solid 4: Instead of trying to appeal to a big Guns of the Patriots Database) demographic with one message like movie-style advertisements,▪ Partner with online publications to create long-form use a digital heavy approach that video content (e.g. Building of Bastion) allows you to hit a variety of smaller demographics through numerous media channels.
  • 6. Read the full article

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