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Wisdom of-crowds-embedded-bi-market-study-2013 Wisdom of-crowds-embedded-bi-market-study-2013 Document Transcript

  • August 7, 2013 Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 2013 Edition Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study Licensed to Actuate
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 2 Disclaimer: This report should be used for informational purposes only. Vendor and product selections should be made based on multiple information sources, face-to-face meetings, customer reference checking, product demonstrations and proof-of-concept applications. The information contained in all Wisdom of Crowds ® Market Study Reports reflects the opinions expressed in the online responses of individuals who chose to respond to our online questionnaire, and does not represent a scientific sampling of any kind. Dresner Advisory Services, LLC shall not be liable for the content of Reports, study results, or for any damages incurred or alleged to be incurred by any of the companies included in the Reports as a result of its content. Reproduction and distribution of this publication in any form without prior written permission is forbidden.
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 3 Definitions Business Intelligence Defined Business intelligence (BI) is “knowledge gained through the access and analysis of business information. Business Intelligence tools and technologies include query and reporting, OLAP (on-line analytical processing), Data Mining and advanced analytics, end-user tools for ad hoc query and analysis” and “dashboards for performance monitoring”. Howard Dresner, The Performance Management Revolution: Business Results Through Insight and Action (John Wiley & Sons, 2007) Embedded Business Intelligence Defined Embedded Business Intelligence is the technological capability to include BI features and functions as an inherent part of another application.
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 4 Introduction This year we celebrate the sixth anniversary of Dresner Advisory Services! Our thanks to all of you that have been with us along the way – encouraging and challenging us! Since our founding in 2007, we have strived to offer a fresh, real-world and alternative perspective on the Business Intelligence (BI) market. We hope that you agree that we have not only succeeded in doing so, but have continued to “raise the bar” - offering increasingly compelling research and greater value with each successive year. We published our first Wisdom of Crowds® Business Intelligence Market Study in 2010. At that time our primary goal was to reach out to Business Intelligence users focusing on evaluating BI vendors and products. Our first research report was 68 pages in length, with 47 charts, and ranking 15 vendors. We have continued to publish the Wisdom of Crowds BI Market Study each year since - expanding its scope and staying true to our goal of providing fresh perspective. This year's Buyers’ Guide Edition was 124 pages with over 95 charts and tables. In 2010 we published our first thematic research study - Mobile Business Intelligence. Since then, we have published three more - expanding to include the broader Mobile Computing topic. Last year we received the registered trademark designation for "Wisdom of Crowds®". Moving forward, all research will be published under this brand. We also added two new thematic research reports to the family: Cloud BI and Collaborative BI. This year we introduce the inaugural Embedded Business Intelligence report – focusing upon the requirement to make BI capabilities pervasive by including them as a part of other applications. Like our other thematic research reports, Embedded BI explores user perceptions and intentions and includes vendor rankings and a buyers’ guide, making it a valuable tool for anyone considering investing in embedded BI products and services. In closing, we’re very excited about both the market and our ability to continue to add substantial perspective and value to it! Thanks for your support! Best, Howard Dresner Chief Research Officer Dresner Advisory Services
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 5 Contents Definitions.....................................................................................................................................................3 Business Intelligence Defined ...................................................................................................................3 Embedded Business Intelligence Defined.................................................................................................3 Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................4 Benefits of the Study.....................................................................................................................................8 A Consumer Guide ....................................................................................................................................8 A Supplier Tool..........................................................................................................................................8 External Awareness...............................................................................................................................8 Internal Planning...................................................................................................................................8 About Howard Dresner and Dresner Advisory Services ...............................................................................9 Survey Method and Data Collection...........................................................................................................10 Data Collection........................................................................................................................................10 Figure 1 - Survey Respondents 2010 - 2013 .......................................................................................10 Data Quality ............................................................................................................................................10 Executive Summary.................................................................................................................................12 Study Demographics...................................................................................................................................12 Geography...............................................................................................................................................13 Figure 2 - Geographic Distribution......................................................................................................13 Functions.................................................................................................................................................14 Figure 3 - Functions Represented .......................................................................................................14 Vertical Industries...................................................................................................................................15 Figure 4 - Vertical Industries ...............................................................................................................15 Organization Size ....................................................................................................................................16 Figure 5 – Organization Size................................................................................................................16 Analysis & Trends: Business Intelligence Users ..........................................................................................18 Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence.....................................................................................18 Figure 6 - Technologies & Initiatives Strategic to Business Intelligence.............................................18 Figure 7 - Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence.................................................................19 Figure 8 - Importance of Embedded BI by Geography........................................................................20 Figure 9 - Importance of Embedded BI by Selected Vertical Industry................................................21
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 6 Figure 10 - Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence by Function...........................................22 Figure 11 – Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence by Organization Size............................23 Figure 12 - Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence by Targeted Users of BI........................24 Figure 13 - Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence by Driving Function ..............................25 Figure 14 – Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence by BI Objectives...................................26 Figure 15 - Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence by Penetration of BI Users ...................27 Figure 16 Importance of Embedded BI by Length of BI Tool Use.......................................................28 Embedded Business Intelligence Architecture .......................................................................................29 Figure 17 - Prioritized Architecture for Embedded BI.........................................................................29 Figure 18 - Embedded Architecture by Organization Size ..................................................................30 Figure 19 - Embedded BI Architecture by Selected Industry..............................................................31 Embedded Business Intelligence Feature Requirements .......................................................................32 Figure 20 – Embedded Business Intelligence Capability Priorities .....................................................32 Figure 21 - Embedded BI Features by Vertical Industry......................................................................33 Figure 22 – Embedded BI Feature Priorities by Organization Size......................................................34 Targeted Applications for Embedded Business Intelligence...................................................................35 Figure 23 – Targeted Applications for Embedding Business Intelligence...........................................35 Figure 24 - Target Applications for Embedded BI by Function ...........................................................36 Figure 25 - Targeted Applications for Embedded BI by Organization Size .........................................37 Integration Resources for Embedded Business Intelligence ..................................................................38 Figure 26 – Prioritized Integration Resources for Embedded Business Intelligence ..........................38 Figure 27 – Prioritized Integration Resources for Embedded BI by Geography.................................39 Figure 28 - Integration Resources for Embedded BI by Function.......................................................40 Figure 29 - Integration Resources for Embedded BI by Select Industry .............................................41 Figure 30 - Integration Resources for Embedded BI by Organization Size .........................................42 Industry and Vendor Analysis .....................................................................................................................44 Figure 31 - Industry Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence ................................................44 Figure 32 - Industry Support for Embedded Business Intelligence Architecture 2013 - 2015............45 Table 1 - User Requirements vs. Industry Support: Embedded Business Intelligence Architecture .46 Figure 33 - Industry Support for Embedded Business Intelligence Features 2013 - 2015..................47 Table 2 - User Requirements vs. Industry Support: Embedded Business Intelligence Features .......48
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 7 Embedded Business Intelligence Vendor Ratings...................................................................................49 Figure 34 - Embedded Business Intelligence Vendor Ratings.............................................................50 Embedded Business Intelligence Buyers’ Guide.........................................................................................51 Table 3 - Embedded Business Intelligence Buyers’ Guide: Architecture ............................................51 Table 4 - Embedded Business Intelligence Buyers’ Guide: Capabilities..............................................52 Glossary.......................................................................................................................................................53 Appendix: Embedded Business Intelligence Study Survey Instrument ......................................................55
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 8 Benefits of the Study The Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study provides a wealth of information and analysis – offering value to both consumers and producers of Business Intelligence technology and services. A Consumer Guide As an objective source of industry research, consumers use the Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study to understand how their peers are leveraging and investing in Business Intelligence and related technologies. Using our unique vendor performance measurement system, users glean key insights into Cloud BI software supplier performance, enabling: Comparisons of current vendor performance to industry norms Identification and selection of new vendors A Supplier Tool Vendor Licensees use the Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study in several important ways: External Awareness Build awareness for the Business Intelligence market and supplier brand, citing Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study trends and vendor performance Create lead and demand-generation for supplier offerings through association with Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study brand, findings, webinars, etc. Internal Planning Refine internal product plans and align with market priorities and realities as identified in Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study Better understand customer priorities, concerns and issues Identify competitive pressures and opportunities
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 9 About Howard Dresner and Dresner Advisory Services The Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study was conceived, designed and executed by Dresner Advisory Services, LLC - an independent advisory firm - and Howard Dresner, its President, Founder and Chief Research Officer. Howard Dresner is one of the foremost thought leaders in Business Intelligence and Performance Management, having coined the term “Business Intelligence” in 1989. He has published two books on the subject, The Performance Management Revolution – Business Results through Insight and Action (John Wiley & Sons – Nov. 2007) and Profiles in Performance – Business Intelligence Journeys and the Roadmap for Change (John Wiley & Sons – Nov. 2009). He lectures at forums around the globe and is regularly cited by the business and trade press. Prior to Dresner Advisory Services, Howard served as Chief Strategy Officer at Hyperion Solutions and was a Research Fellow at Gartner, where he led its Business Intelligence research practice for 13 years. Howard has conducted and directed numerous in-depth primary research studies over the course of the past two decades and is an expert in analyzing these markets. Through the Wisdom of Crowds ® Business Intelligence market research reports, Howard engages with a global community to redefine how research is created and shared. Landmark research reports include: - The Wisdom of Crowds ® Business Intelligence Market Study - The Wisdom of Crowds ® Collaborative Business Intelligence Market Study - The Wisdom of Crowds ® Cloud Business Intelligence Market Study - The Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study - The Wisdom of Crowds ® Mobile Computing/ Mobile Business Intelligence Market Study. Howard (www.twitter.com/howarddresner) conducts a weekly Twitter “tweetchat” on Fridays at 1PM ET. The hashtag is #BIWisdom. During these live events the BIWisdom “tribe” discusses a wide range of Business Intelligence topics. More information about Dresner Advisory Services can be found at www.dresneradvisory.com.
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 10 Survey Method and Data Collection As with all of our Wisdom of Crowds ® Business Intelligence Market Studies, we constructed a survey instrument to collect data and used social media and crowd- sourcing techniques to recruit participants. We expanded data collection to include our own research community of roughly 2,000 organizations as well as vendors’ customer communities. Data Collection The volume of data collected continues to expand each year. For 2013, we collected 1,182 completed surveys – exceeding our goal of 1,100 with 40% growth over 2012 (Figure 1). Figure 1 - Survey Respondents 2010 - 2013 Data Quality All respondent entries were carefully scrutinized and verified to ensure that only qualified participants are included in the study. 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 2010 2011 2012 2013 Survey Respondents 2010 - 2013 Target Actual
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 11 Executive Summary
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 12 Executive Summary Embedded Business Intelligence has resonated well with our community of respondents with a majority indicating it’s either “critical”, “very important” or “important”. “Back office” functions (e.g., Supply chain, IT, Operations) rate the importance of Embedded BI higher than their “front office” counterparts. Those seeking to automate external constituents (customers, suppliers) were much more favorably inclined towards Embedded BI. Although focused upon “back office” functions, organizations’ intent is to use Embedded BI to increase competitive advantage, enhance customer service and grow revenues as opposed to only improving “operational efficiency”. Recent adopters of Business Intelligence tools and technologies were more likely to give Embedded BI a higher priority than those that are well established. Technical approaches for inclusion of BI functionality within other applications favors a more practical, modern and web-centered method (e.g., iframe, RESTful). Topping the list of application targets for Embedded BI are: Web portals, Financial management applications (e.g., treasury, procurement, compliance) and ERP (e.g., order processing, inventory). Internal resources (e.g., central & departmental IT and business analysts) are far more likely to provide the integration services to embed BI into applications than third parties (e.g., consultants, software vendors). Industry support for both Embedded BI architecture and features is well aligned with user requirements – providing a number of potential options for organizations to choose from – possibly including BI vendor products already in use.
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 13 Study Demographics As with last year, we’ve seen a rich cross-section of data across geographies, functions, organization size, and vertical industries. We believe that, unlike other industry research, this supports a more representative sample and better indicator of true market dynamics. Cross-tab analyses have been constructed using these demographics to identify and illustrate important industry trends. Geography As in previous years, we’ve been able to attract survey respondents from a wide array of geographies – including 25% from EMEA (35 countries) and 11% from APAC (15 countries). Although North America represents the largest group, it is in itself diverse – representing five Canadian provinces, 43 US states and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Figure 2). Figure 2 - Geographic Distribution 59% 25% 11% 4% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% North America Europe, Middle East and Africa Asia/Pacific Latin America Geographic Distribution
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 14 Functions For 2013, we expanded the functions that we track – adding the BI Competency Center (BICC) and splitting Sales and Marketing into their respective functions. While the IT Department represents the largest single group of respondents, representing 35% of the sample, executive management (18%) and the BICC (17%) are well represented (Figure 3). This distribution across functions has enabled us to develop analyses comparing and contrasting the plans and priorities of the different departments within organizations. Figure 3 - Functions Represented 36% 19% 17% 6% 5% 4% 4% 3% 3% 1% 1% 0% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% Functions Represented
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 15 Vertical Industries For 2013, vertical industry distribution was similar to 2012– with solid participation from Technology, Consulting, Financial Services, Health Care, and Manufacturing. We encourage the participation of consultants – who oftentimes have deeper industry knowledge than their customer counterparts. This also yields insight into the partner ecosystem for BI vendors (Figure 4). Figure 4 - Vertical Industries 24% 15% 12% 10% 9% 7% 6% 5% 5% 4% 3% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% Vertical Industries
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 16 Organization Size We saw strong participation from a balanced mix of small, medium and large organizations (Figure 5). Similar to 2012, this year the largest of organizations represented 24% of the sample, mid-sized organizations 45% and the smallest of organizations 31%. As with previous years, we have found important differences by organization size. Figure 5 – Organization Size 31% 27% 7% 10% 7% 18% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 1-100 101 - 1,000 1,001 - 2,000 2,001 - 5,000 5,001 - 10,000 More than 10,000 Organization Size
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 17 Analysis & Trends
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 18 Analysis & Trends: Business Intelligence Users Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence Although Business Intelligence remains dominated by more traditional approaches and technologies, Embedded BI scored high on the list of priorities, with more than half of respondents indicating it is “critical” or “very important” to them (Figure 6). This places Embedded BI in the top half of our 19 technology/initiatives related to Business Intelligence – higher than Big Data, Social media analysis, etc. Figure 6 - Technologies & Initiatives Strategic to Business Intelligence 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Open Source Software Complex Event Processing (CEP) Social media Analysis (SocialBI) Text Analytics Big Data (e.g., Hadoop) Ability to write to transactional applications Software-as-a-Service and "Cloud" Computing Collaborative Support for Group-based Analysis Search-based interface In-memory analysis "Embedded" BI (contained within an application,… Mobile Device Support Data Mining, Advanced Algorithms, Predictive Data Discovery Integration with Operational Processes Data Warehousing Advanced visualization End user "self service" Dashboards Technologies & Initiatives Strategic to Business Intelligence Critical Very Important Important Somewhat Important Not Important
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 19 Embedded Business Intelligence has resonated with our community of respondents with a majority indicating it’s either “critical”, “very important” or “important” (Figure 7). This sentiment has been echoed in conversations with many user organizations seeking to make Business Intelligence pervasive and to enable and improve decision-making at all levels within the organization – especially at an operational level. Figure 7 - Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% Critical Very Important Important Somewhat Important Not Important Importance of Embedded BI
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 20 As with many new and emerging technology trends, North American organizations tend to be among the earliest of adopters (Figure 8). Although North American organizations comprise the greatest number of “critical” responses, Latin America and Asia Pacific scored higher on a “weighted mean” basis. More EMEA organizations ranked Embedded BI as “Not important” versus other geographies. Figure 8 - Importance of Embedded BI by Geography 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% North America Europe, Middle East, & Africa Latin America Asia Pacific Importance of Embedded BI by Geography Not Important Somewhat Important Important Very Important Critical Mean
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 21 Industries indicating greater importance of Embedded BI and – therefore - a desire to deliver pervasive BI include: Financial Services, Telecommunications, Insurance and Education. Those indicating the lowest importance include Retail & Wholesale, Manufacturing, Health care and Transportation (Figure 9). Figure 9 - Importance of Embedded BI by Selected Vertical Industry 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Importance of Embedded BI by Selected Vertical Industry Not Important Somewhat Important Important Very Important Critical Mean
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 22 From a departmental perspective, we find that “back office” functions (e.g., Supply chain, IT, Operations) rate the importance of Embedded BI higher than their “front office” counterparts (Figure 10). This aligns with our view that primary targets for embedded BI are operational in nature. In other words, there is a desire to deliver decision-making to tactical users who are closer to core business processes. Figure 10 - Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence by Function 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Importance of Embedded BI by Select Function Not Important Somewhat Important Important Very Important Critical Mean
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 23 As with other studies, we observe a “U-shaped” curve of interest for Embedded BI with the largest and smallest of organizations assigning greater importance than mid-sized ones (Figure 11). This is typical of many new technologies or initiatives where smaller, more agile organizations use it to drive competitive advantage while larger organizations add it to strategic initiatives in an effort to improve efficiency, effectiveness, etc. Figure 11 – Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence by Organization Size 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 1-100 101 - 1,000 1,001 - 2,000 2,001 - 5,000 5,001 - 10,000 More than 10,000 Importance of Embedded BI by Organization Size
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 24 Those organizations seeking to deliver Business Intelligence to internal users were less inclined towards an embedded approach. However, those seeking to automate external constituents (customers, suppliers) were much more favorably inclined towards Embedded BI (Figure 12). This makes sense as organizations strive to provide a seamless experience for customers and suppliers – including BI as a part of that interaction. Figure 12 - Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence by Targeted Users of BI 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70 3.80 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Importance of Embedded BI by Targeted Users Not Important Somewhat Important Important Very Important Critical Mean
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 25 Supporting the previous analysis on page 22, operational roles which are driving BI tend to favor embedding versus “front office” roles (Figure 13). By putting BI in context of operational applications, tactical end users can incrementally improve performance on a transactional level, which can be significant when aggregated at the corporate level. Figure 13 - Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence by Driving Function 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Importance of Embedded BI by Driving Function Not Important Somewhat Important Important Very Important Critical Mean
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 26 We were interested to find that while Embedded BI is more important to “back office” functions, their intent is to increase competitive advantage, enhance customer service and grow revenues as opposed to only improving operational efficiency (Figure 14). This strongly suggests that Embedded BI should be considered a strategic priority for operational applications. Figure 14 – Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence by BI Objectives 3.25 3.30 3.35 3.40 3.45 3.50 3.55 3.60 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Importance of Embedded BI by Objective Not Important Somewhat Important Important Very Important Critical Mean
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 27 An interesting finding is that organizations with the greatest penetration of Business Intelligence usage ascribe a higher priority and importance to Embedded BI than those with lower density of usage (Figure 15). Those with the highest penetration also tend to report the greatest success with Business Intelligence and tend to be more strategic in its use. Figure 15 - Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence by Penetration of BI Users 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Under 10% 11 - 20% 21 - 40% 41 - 60% 61 - 80% 81% or more Importance of Embedded BI by Penetration of Users Not Important Somewhat Important Important Very Important Critical Mean
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 28 It is notable that more recent adopters of Business Intelligence tools and technologies were more likely to give Embedded BI a higher priority than those that are well established (Figure 16). While there may be a number of explanations for this phenomenon, our assumption is that recent adopters are more open to recent technological advancements and have a less rigid view of BI deployment options. Figure 16 Importance of Embedded BI by Length of BI Tool Use 2.90 2.95 3.00 3.05 3.10 3.15 3.20 3.25 3.30 3.35 3.40 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Less than 1 year 1 - 2 years 3 - 5 years 6 - 10 years More than 10 years Importance of Embedded BI by Length of BI Tool Use Not Important Somewhat Important Important Very Important Critical Mean
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 29 Embedded Business Intelligence Architecture Technical approaches for inclusion of BI functionality within other applications favor more practical, modern and web-centered methods (e.g., iframe, RESTful). These are followed by more programmatic approaches requiring development resources and 3GL programming environments (e.g., Java API). And, finally, the least preferred methods include widgets and gadgets (Figure 17). Figure 17 - Prioritized Architecture for Embedded BI 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 4.50 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Prioritized Architecture for Embedded BI Unimportant Somewhat Important Important Very Important Critical Mean
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 30 Although prioritization of embedded architectural approaches is fairly consistent across different organization sizes, there are a few key differences (Figure 18). For example, smaller organizations show a greater interest in Google Gadgets, Desktop widgets and Web Services than their larger counterparts. Larger organizations prefer Frameworks, .NET API and Portlets over smaller ones. In large part, this maps to existing investments that organizations have already made in development tools, packaged applications, etc. Figure 18 - Embedded Architecture by Organization Size 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 Embedded Architecture by Organization Size 1-100 101 - 1,000 1,001 - 2,000 2,001 - 5,000 5,001 - 10,000 More than 10,000
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 31 Most vertical industries were fairly consistent in their preference for architectural approaches for embedding BI capabilities (Figure 19). However, in particular, the Technology industry was the most favorably inclined towards the use of HTML/iframe and the least inclined towards Portlets and Frameworks. Government assigned a higher priority to JavaScript than all other verticals. Figure 19 - Embedded BI Architecture by Selected Industry 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 Google Gadgets COM Desktop widgets Portlets Frameworks (Force.com, Sharepoint) .NET API Java API Java_Script API Web Services (RESTful, Soap) HTML/ iframe Embedded BI Architecture by Selected Industry Technology Financial Services Health Care Education Government Retail & Wholesale Insurance
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 32 Embedded Business Intelligence Feature Requirements The top feature for Embedded Business Intelligence is “Interact with objects”, followed by Single-sign-on – an essential element to create a seamless experience for users (Figure 20). Other key user features include Refresh objects/prompts, Open/view objects and Browse/select from catalog of objects. Although feature requirements were less passive than simple viewing, more advance features such as “mashups” and “predictive analytics” were a relatively low priority. Figure 20 – Embedded Business Intelligence Capability Priorities 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 4.50 5.00 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Embedded Business Intelligence Feature Priorities Unimportant Somewhat Important Important Very Important Critical Rating Average
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 33 Although there is general agreement for basic functionality across vertical industries, Technology and Insurance have the most advanced requirements for Embedded BI features – including Re-skinning and analytical algorithms (Figure 21). In contrast, Education and Retail appear to have more modest requirements. In our opinion, Embedded Business Intelligence can be used by these organizations as a means of deepening relationships with customers and other “stakeholders”. Figure 21 - Embedded BI Features by Vertical Industry 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 4.50 Re-skinning/customizing interface Apply analytical algorithms, mining, predictive Modify/create objects Browse/select from catalog of objects Save & publish objectsOpen/view objects Refresh objects/prompts Single sign-on/security integration Interact with objects (navigate, filter, drill) Embedded BI Features by Vertical Industry Technology Financial Services Health Care Education Government Retail & Wholesale Insurance
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 34 As noted earlier, the smallest and largest of organizations assign the highest priority to Embedded BI compared to mid-sized ones. Likewise, they are more ambitious and are more likely to fully exploit a range of embedded features (Figure 22). That said, smaller organizations appear even more aggressive than their larger counterparts – especially concerning “re-skinning” and “mashups”. Figure 22 – Embedded BI Feature Priorities by Organization Size 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 Re-skinning/customizing interface Introduce user-supplied data for "mashups" Modify/create objects Apply analytical algorithms, mining, predictive Save & publish objects Browse/select from catalog of objects Open/view objects Refresh objects/prompts Single sign-on/security integration Interact with objects (navigate, filter, drill) Embedded BI Feature Priorities by Organization Size 1-1000 1001-5000 5000 +
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 35 Targeted Applications for Embedded Business Intelligence Topping the list of application targets for Embedded BI are: Web portals, Financial management applications (e.g., treasury, procurement, compliance) and ERP (e.g., order processing, inventory). Although Web portal integration is a fairly general requirement, the others are more operational in nature and consistent with our other findings (Figure 23). Figure 23 – Targeted Applications for Embedding Business Intelligence 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 4.50 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Targeted Applications for Embedding Business Intelligence Unimportant Somewhat Important Important Very Important Critical Rating Average
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 36 The importance of targeted applications tends to vary by the department of the person responding to the question. For example, supply chain managers give a higher priority to embedding BI in supply chain and ERP applications, while sales & marketing management focus upon sales and marketing applications (Figure 24). That said, there is general agreement across all functions that financial management and ERP applications are a high priority. Figure 24 - Target Applications for Embedded BI by Function 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 4.50 Target Applications for Embedded BI by Function Finance Information Technology (IT) Marketing Operations Sales Supply Chain Average
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 37 Confirming our current view, smaller organizations tend to focus upon “front office” applications for Embedded BI (e.g., Salesforce management applications, Marketing automation applications) while larger organizations focus more upon “back office” (ERP applications, Financial management applications) (Figure 25). Figure 25 - Targeted Applications for Embedded BI by Organization Size 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 Targeted Applications for Embedded BI by Organization Size 1-100 101 - 1,000 1,001 - 2,000 2,001 - 5,000 5,001 - 10,000 More than 10,000 Average
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 38 Integration Resources for Embedded Business Intelligence When we first asked who would provide the integration services to embed BI into applications, we expected third parties (e.g., consultants, software vendors) to figure more prominently. However, internal resources (e.g., central & departmental IT and business analysts) are far more likely to be relied upon for this work (Figure 26). Figure 26 – Prioritized Integration Resources for Embedded Business Intelligence 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 120% Prioritized Integration Resources for Embedded Business Intelligence Unlikely Possibly Probably Definitely Rating Average
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 39 Geography plays an important role in determining who will embed Business Intelligence capabilities within other applications (Figure 27). Specifically, North American organizations prefer internal resources (e.g., departmental IT) to do the work. In contrast, APAC and EMEA prefer external resources (e.g., consultants, software vendors). Figure 27 – Prioritized Integration Resources for Embedded BI by Geography 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 Central IT Department Third party consultant Application software vendor Departmental IT BI Software vendor Business Analyst Prioritized Integration Resources for Embedded BI by Geography North America Europe, Middle East and Africa Asia/Pacific
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 40 From a functional perspective, most indicated a preference for the Central IT department to do the work of embedding Business Intelligence capabilities (Figure 28). In contrast, Departmental IT and Business Analyst integration resources were preferred by Human Resources, Supply chain and Finance functions – which have a history of using alternatives to Central IT-delivered solutions. Figure 28 - Integration Resources for Embedded BI by Function 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 Business Intelligence Competency Finance Human Resources Information Technology (IT) Marketing Operations Sales Supply Chain Integration Resources for Embedded BI by Function Application software vendor Third party consultant BI Software vendor Business Analyst Departmental IT Central IT Department
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 41 While all industries appear to favor Central IT for integration and embedding of BI capabilities, several indicated a secondary preference for Departmental IT. These include Healthcare, Government, Manufacturing, Retail & Wholesale (Figure 29). Business Analysts were a secondary choice for Technology and Insurance industries. Financial Services was the only industry to prefer Third party consultants as a secondary integration resource. Figure 29 - Integration Resources for Embedded BI by Select Industry 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 Integration Resources for Embedded BI by Select Industry Application software vendor Departmental IT BI Software vendor Business Analyst Third party consultant Central IT Department
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 42 All sizes of organizations preferred a Central IT function to carry out the work of embedded BI functionality into other applications (Figure 30). Smaller organizations also relied upon third party resources (BI and Application software vendors) more so than their larger counterparts. In addition, Departmental IT becomes more prominent, as an integration resource, in relation to organization size. Figure 30 - Integration Resources for Embedded BI by Organization Size 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 1-100 101 - 1,000 1,001 - 2,000 2,001 - 5,000 5,001 - 10,000 More than 10,000 Integration Resources for Embedded BI by Organization Size Application software vendor Third party consultant BI Software vendor Business Analyst Departmental IT Central IT Department
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 43 Industry and Vendor Analysis
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 44 Industry and Vendor Analysis We reached out to the vendor community and asked questions about their capabilities and plans for Embedded BI, including its perceived importance to their strategies. What we found is typical of most nascent market dynamics. While the greatest majority of vendors believe that Embedded BI is “critically important” (51%), a smaller number of vendors remain less committed (Figure 31). Figure 31 - Industry Importance of Embedded Business Intelligence 51% 31% 18% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Critically important Very important Somewhat Important Industry Importance of Embedded BI
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 45 Today, a majority of vendors support the most popular architectural options for embedding BI (e.g., iframe, RESTful). Industry support for additional architectural options is expected to expand, including JavaScript and Java APIs, Frameworks and Portlets by 2016 (Figure 32). However, we expect to see only limited industry support for .NET, Google Gadgets, Desktop widgets and COM. Figure 32 - Industry Support for Embedded Business Intelligence Architecture 2013 - 2015 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Industry Support for Embedded BI Architecture No Plans 24 Months 12 Months Available Today
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 46 User and industry alignment of architectural priorities for Embedded BI is unusually good (Table 1). This removes what might otherwise have been a significant barrier, and should help to facilitate the proliferation of embedded Business Intelligence capabilities more quickly. Table 1 - User Requirements vs. Industry Support: Embedded Business Intelligence Architecture User Requirement Vendor Capabilities HTML/ iframe HTML/ iframe Web Services (RESTful, Soap) Web Services (RESTful, Soap) Java_Script API Java_Script API Java API Java API Frameworks (Force.com, Sharepoint) Frameworks (Force.com, Sharepoint) .NET API Portlets Portlets .NET API Desktop widgets Google Gadgets COM Desktop widgets Google Gadgets COM
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 47 As with industry support for architecture, a majority of vendors today support all of the Embedded BI features that we’ve documented (Figure 33). Basic capabilities are supported by nearly 100% of vendors while more esoteric features – such as “mashups” are less well supported. With that in mind, organizations seeking to embed BI functionality today will find a number of viable alternatives – possibly including vendors whose products may already be in use. Figure 33 - Industry Support for Embedded Business Intelligence Features 2013 - 2015 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Industry Support for Embedded Features 2013 - 2015 No Plans 24 Months 12 Months Available Today
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 48 User requirements and current vendor capabilities are aligned for most features – including interacting with objects, open/view objects, and refresh objects/prompts (Table 2). Users place a higher priority upon single sign-on and Save & publish objects than vendors. Vendors place more importance upon Browse/select from catalog of options than users. Table 2 - User Requirements vs. Industry Support: Embedded Business Intelligence Features User Requirement Vendor Capabilities Interact with objects (navigate, filter, drill) Interact with objects (navigate, filter, drill) Single sign-on/security integration Browse/select from catalog of objects Open/view objects Open/view objects Refresh objects/prompts Refresh objects/prompts Save & publish objects Single sign-on/security integration Browse/select from catalog of objects Re-skinning/customizing interface Modify/create objects Save & publish objects Apply analytical algorithms, mining, predictive Modify/create objects Introduce user-supplied data for "mashups" Apply analytical algorithms, mining, predictive Re-skinning/customizing interface Introduce user-supplied data for "mashups"
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 49 Embedded Business Intelligence Vendor Ratings In rating the vendors, we considered Embedded BI features/capabilities and Embedded architecture. A minimum score of 10/20 (50%) was required to be ranked. As a result, out of 23 vendors rated in the 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Business Intelligence Market Study, a subset of 21 have been ranked for Embedded BI. Vendors with a score of 80% (or better) include (in alphabetical order): Actuate, Dundas, IBM, Information Builders, Jedox, LogiAnalytics, MicroStrategy, Pentaho, SAP, SAS and Yellowfin (Figure 34). Additional details surrounding Embedded BI vendor capabilities can be found in the following Buyers’ Guide section (pages 51 – 52).
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 50 Figure 34 - Embedded Business Intelligence Vendor Ratings 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Actuate Birst Dimensional Insight Dundas IBM iDashboards Infor Information Builders Jaspersoft Jedox LogiAnalyticsMicroStrategy Oracle Panopticon Pentaho QlikTech SAP SAS Tableau TIBCO Spotfire Yellowfin Embedded Business Intelligence Vendor Ratings TOTAL PLATFORM TOTAL FEATURE TOTAL EMBEDDED SCORE
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 51 Embedded Business Intelligence Buyers’ Guide In the following two pages, we detail current vendor Embedded BI functionality, based on our 20 criteria surrounding architecture (Table 3) and features (Table 4). Table 3 - Embedded Business Intelligence Buyers’ Guide: Architecture Vendor ActuateCorp Birst DimensionalInsight DundasData Visualization,Inc. IBM iDashboards Infor InformationBuilders Inc. Jaspersoft Corporation JedoxAG LogiXML,Inc. MicroStrategy,Inc Oracle Panopticon Software Pentaho QlikTech SAP SAS TableauSoftware TIBCOSoftware Inc. Yellowfin HTML/ iframe X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Web Services (RESTful, Soap) X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Google Gadgets X X X X X X X Desktop widgets X X X X X X Portlets X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Java_Script API X X X X X X X X X X X X X Java API X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X .NET API X X X X X X X X X X X COM X X X X X X Frameworks X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 52 Table 4 - Embedded Business Intelligence Buyers’ Guide: Capabilities Vendor ActuateCorp Birst DimensionalInsight DundasData Visualization,Inc. IBM iDashboards Infor InformationBuilders Inc. Jaspersoft Corporation JedoxAG LogiXML,Inc. MicroStrategy,Inc Oracle Panopticon Software Pentaho QlikTech SAP SAS TableauSoftware TIBCOSoftwareInc. Yellowfin Browse/select from catalog of objects X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Open/view objects X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Interact with objects (navigate, filter, drill) X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Refresh objects/prompts X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Modify/create objects X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Save & publish objects X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Apply analytical algorithms, mining, predictive X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Introduce user-supplied data for "mashups" X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Single sign-on/security integration X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Re- skinning/customizing interface X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 53 Glossary An application programming interface (API) specifies how some software components should interact with each other. In practice, most often an API is a library that includes specifications for routines, data structures, object classes, and variables. An API specification can take many forms, including an International Standard such as POSIX, vendor documentation such as the Microsoft Windows API, the libraries of a programming language, e.g., Standard Template Library in C++ or Java API. An API differs from an application binary interface (ABI) in that an API is source code based while an ABI is a binary interface. For instance POSIX is an API, while the Linux Standard Base is an ABI. * Component Object Model (COM) is a binary-interface standard for software components introduced by Microsoft in 1993. It is used to enable inter-process communication and dynamic object creation in a large range of programming languages. COM is the basis for several other Microsoft technologies and frameworks, including OLE, OLE Automation, ActiveX, COM+, DCOM, the Windows shell, DirectX, and Windows Runtime. * Google Gadgets are dynamic web content that can be embedded on a web page. They can be added to and interact strongly with Google's iGoogle personalized home page (although this will be discontinued in November 2013) and the Google Desktop (discontinued in September 2011) application, as well as Google Wave (also no longer supported by Google). Webmasters can add and customize a gadget to their own business or personal web site, a process called "syndication." Gadgets are developed by Google and third-party developers using the Google Gadgets API, using basic web technologies such as XML and JavaScript. * The HTML <iframe> Element (or HTML inline frame element) represents a nested browsing context, effectively embedding another HTML page into the current page. In HTML 4.01, a document may contain a head and a body or a head and a frame-set, but not both a body and a frame-set. However, an <iframe> can be used within a normal document body. Each browsing context has its own session history and active document. The browsing context that contains the embedded content is called the parent browsing context. The top-level browsing context (which has no parent) is typically the browser window. (Source: Mozilla Developer Network) JavaScript (JS) is an interpreted computer programming language. It was originally implemented as part of web browsers so that client-side scripts could interact with the user, control the browser, communicate asynchronously, and alter the document content that was displayed. More recently, however, it has become common in both game development and the creation of desktop applications. * A mashup, in web development, is a web page, or web application, that uses and combines data, presentation or functionality from two or more sources to create new services. The term implies easy, fast integration, frequently using open application programming interfaces (API) and data sources to produce enriched results that were not necessarily the original reason for producing the raw source data. *
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 54 The main characteristics of a mashup are combination, visualization, and aggregation. It is important to make existing data more useful, for personal and professional use. To be able to permanently access the data of other services, mashups are generally client applications or hosted online. * The .NET Framework is a software framework developed by Microsoft that runs primarily on Microsoft Windows. It includes a large library and provides language interoperability (each language can use code written in other languages) across several programming languages. Programs written for the .NET Framework execute in a software environment (as contrasted to hardware environment), known as the Common Language Runtime (CLR), an application virtual machine that provides services such as security, memory management, and exception handling. The class library and the CLR together constitute the .NET Framework. * Portlets are pluggable user interface software components that are managed and displayed in a web portal. Portlets produce fragments of markup code that are aggregated into a portal. Typically, following the desktop metaphor, a portal page is displayed as a collection of non- overlapping portlet windows, where each portlet window displays a portlet. Hence a portlet (or collection of portlets) resembles a web-based application that is hosted in a portal. Some examples of portlet applications are email, weather reports, discussion forums, and news. Portlet standards are intended to enable software developers to create portlets that can be plugged into any portal supporting the standards. * A web service is a method of communication between two electronic devices over the World Wide Web. A web service is a software function provided at a network address over the web or the cloud, it is a service that is "always on" as in the concept of utility computing. The W3C defines a "Web service" as: [...] a software system designed to support interoperable machine- to-machine interaction over a network. It has an interface described in a machine-processable format (specifically WSDL). Other systems interact with the Web service in a manner prescribed by its description using SOAP messages, typically conveyed using HTTP with an XML serialization in conjunction with other Web-related standards. The W3C also states: We can identify two major classes of Web services: REST-compliant Web services, in which the primary purpose of the service is to manipulate XML representations of Web resources using a uniform set of "stateless" operations; and arbitrary Web services, in which the service may expose an arbitrary set of operations. * A software widget is a generic type of software application comprising portable code intended for one or more different software platforms. The term often implies that either the application, user interface, or both, are light, meaning relatively simple and easy to use, as exemplified by a desk accessory or applet, as opposed to a more complete software package such as a spreadsheet or word processor. * * Source: Wikipedia except where noted
  • 2013 Wisdom of Crowds ® Embedded Business Intelligence Market Study http://www.dresneradvisory.com Copyright 2013 – Dresner Advisory Services, LLC 55 Appendix: Embedded Business Intelligence Study Survey Instrument
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