• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Jute in india
 

Jute in india

on

  • 492 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
492
Views on SlideShare
492
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
54
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Jute in india Jute in india Presentation Transcript

    • JUTE
    • BY SUNIL TALEKAR-M. SC.
    • HISTORY OF JUTE Jute has been used since ancient times in Africa and Asia to provide a cordage and weaving fiber from the stem and food from the leaves. In several historical documents ( Ain-e-Akbari by Abul Fazal in 1590) during the era of the great Mughal Emperor Akbar (1542 –1605) states that the poor villagers of India used to wear clothes made of jute.
    • JUTE A NATURAL FIBER
    • JUTE A NATURAL FIBER • Jute is a natural fibre with golden and silky shine and hence called The Golden Fibre. • It is the cheapest vegetable fibre procured from the bast or skin of the plant's stem and the second most important vegetable fibre after cotton, in terms of usage, global consumption, production, and availability. • It has high tensile strength, low extensibility, and ensures better breath ability of fabrics. • Jute fibre is 100% biodegradable and recyclable and thus environmentally friendly.
    • JUTE TRADE • Jute trade is currently centered around the Indian subcontinent. • Bangladesh is the largest exporter of raw jute, and India is the largest producer as well as largest consumer of jute products in the world. • Nearly 75% of Jute goods are used as packaging materials, burlap (Hessian), and sacks. Carpet Backing Cloth, the third major Jute outlet, is fast growing in importance.
    • JUTE TRADE • Currently, it consists of roughly 15% of the world’s Jute goods consumption. • The remaining products are carpet yarn, cordage, felts, padding, twine, ropes, decorative fabrics, and miscellaneous items for industrial use.
    • JUTE TRADE • Jute has entered the non-woven industry as it is one of the most cost effective high tensile vegetable fibre. • Therefore, the demand for Jute has made its way into the automotive industry. Jute is now being used to manufacture more eco-friendly interiors for cars and automobiles.
    • TYPES OF JUTE
    • TYPES OF JUTE • jute products fall into four classes of manufacture: 1. HESSIAN or BURLAP: A plain woven fabric of 5 to 12 ozs. a yard, made of good quality jute yarn. It is used for a wide range of applications as in cloth form and in the form of bags.
    • TYPES OF JUTE 2. SACKING: It is also known as "heavy • goods," made from lower grades of fiber, loosely woven cloth, in plain or twill weave, weighing from 12-20 ozs. per yard of different widths. It is used for bags of all types.
    • TYPES OF JUTE • 3. CANVAS - The finest jute product, closely woven of the best grades of fiber widely used in India for protection from the weather.
    • TYPES OF JUTE 4. JUTE YARN and TWINE - Most of the single strand jute yarn • produced is consumed by the mills themselves in fabric and twine manufacture. Jute twine in varying weights and thickness is, used extensively both in India and abroad for sewing, tying, and for a variety of industrial applications such as packing pipe joints, cable binding, etc.
    • JUTE CULTIVATION
    • JUTE CULITVATION Jute is a rainy season crop, sown from March to May according to rainfall and type of land. It is harvested from June to September depending upon whether the sowings are early or late.
    • JUTE CULITVATION Climate and Soils Jute requires a warm and humid climate with temperature between 24° C to 37° C. Constant rain or water-logging is harmful. The new gray alluvial soil of good depth, receiving salt from annual floods, is best for jute. Flow ever jute is grown widely in sandy loams and clay loams.
    • JUTE CULITVATION Sowing of jute Sowing of jute in midlands and high lands starts with showers in March or April and continues till early June in the western part of the jute belt. Compost or firm yard manure, Phosphorus and Potash, Nitrogen fertilizers are used as a fertilizer. Interculturing is essential in the early stage. Pasts are also require for plant protection.
    • JUTE CULITVATION Harvesting Jute is harvested any time between 120 days to 150 days when the flowers have been shed, early harvesting gives good healthy fibers. The plant from 8 to 12 feet high are cut with stickles at or close the ground level. In flooded land, plants are up rooted. The harvested plants are left in field for 3 days for the leaves to shed. The stems are then made up into bundles for steeping in water. Steeping is carried out immediately after harvest.
    • THE FIBRE EXTRACTION
    • THE FIBRE EXTRACTION The Fibre Extraction : The jute plant's fibres lie beneath the bark and surrounded the woody central part of the stem. To extract the fibres from the stem, the process is carried out in the following stages
    • THE FIBRE EXTRACTION Retting Retting is a process in which the tied bundles of jute stalks are taken to the tank by which fibres get loosened and separated from the woody stalk. The bundles are steeped in water at least 60 cm to 100 cm depth. The retting process is completed in 8 to 30 days, when the barks separate out easily from the stick or wood and the fibres are ready for extraction. A development in recent years is adoption of ribbon retting technology in jute growing trade of the country.
    • RETTING
    • STRIPPING 1 Stripping(Fibre Extraction) Stripping is the process of removing the fibres from the stalk after the completion of retting. Fibres are removed from the stalk by any one of the following methods : (i) Single plants are taken and their fibers are taken off. (ii) Taken off a handful of stalks, breaking it in a to and fro motion in water. (iii) Washing the stalks first by standing in waist deep water and then stripping afterwards.
    • STRIPPING 2
    • STRIPPING 2
    • STRIPPING 3
    • WASHING AND DRYING Extracted fibres are washed in clean water. The dark colour of fibres can be removed by dipping them in tamarind water for 15 to 20 minutes and again washed in clean water. After squeezing excess water the fibres are hang on bamboo railing for sun drying for 2-3 days.
    • THE FIBRE EXTRACTION When there is a plenty of water, bundles of stalks are laid in the pond ditches or slow moving streams and left for 5-15 days under water. The bunch of stem is held in one hand and the root end tapped lightly with a mallet. After loosens the rest of fibres, fibres are extracted and washed.
    • WASHING AND DRYING
    • BAILING AND PACKING Bailing and Packing The jute fibre is graded into tops, middles, B, C and X-bottoms. Packing into Kutcha bales about 250 pounds for use in the home trade. they are transported to jute market or direct to jute mills.
    • STANDARD CONSTRUCTIONS CLASSIFIED
    • STANDARD CONSTRUCTIONS CLASSIFIED Basic Jute products fabrics produced in jute mills in India are of standard constructions classified as the following : 1) Hessian Cloth 2) Sacking Cloth 3) Jute Yarn and Twines 4) D. W. Tarpaulin 5) Canvas 6) Bags 7) Hydrocarbon Free Jute Cloth 8) Geotextiles
    • HESSIAN CLOTH • Hessian cloth is a finer quality jute fabric, a plain woven fabric of 5 to 12 ozs, a yard. Hessian is also called Burlap. • Hessian cloth is used for a wide range of applications and is exported all over the world both in cloth form and in the form of bags. • Bags are used to store and pack varieties of goods and commodities such as pulses grain, potato, onion, sugar and tobacco. •The bags are available for packing goods up to 60 kg. of weight.
    • HESSIAN CLOTH
    • SACKING CLOTH * Sacking cloth also known as heavy goods, made from lower grades of jute fibres. * Sacking is heavy, loosely woven cloth in plain or twrill weave, weighting from 15-20 ozs per yard of different widths. •Sacking cloth is used for jute bags to pack food grains, sugar and Cement etc. in a weight range from 50 to 100 kg. •The different qualities of this category are A. Twill, B. Twill, hy Cees, D.W Flocer, Cement Bags etc.
    • SACKING CLOTH
    • JUTE YARN AND TWINES JUTE YARN Jute Yarn and Twines Jute Yarn manufactured is consumed by jute mills in fabric and twine manufacture. Fine Yarn is manufactured exclusively for export purpose and utilised for making jute blended fabrics, diversified jute goods ropes and decorate wall covering. Jute Twine is varying weights and thickness is extensively used in India and abroad for sewing, tying and other industrial applications.
    • JUTE YARN AND TWINES JUTE YARN
    • Jute Yarn and Twines Jute Yarn
    • D.W. TARPAULIN Tarpaulin are used mainly for coverings on a multidimensional scale.
    • CANVAS Canvas is the finest jute product, closely woven with best grades of fibre. Jute canvas is widely used in India for protection from weather. Canvas and Screin lamination with paper polythene is used in mines.
    • JUTE USE USE OF JUTE
    • BAGS •hopping Bags are made from hessian or sacking cloths with handles, straps, chains in different shapes and dimensions. • They are used specially for marketing. • They are bleached and decorated with different artistic designs. • Promotional bags are generally sample bags to promote items for sale. • Polylined / Polylamined bags are hessian or sacking bags with a coated polythene film.
    • BAGS
    • HYDROCARBON FREE JUTE CLOTH Hydrocarbon free jute cloth is a hessian fabric free from the presence of hydrocarbon. it is made by treating jute with vegetable oil. These type of bags are extensively used for packing of coffee, cocoa, peanut beans or other food material. The bags are free from any kerosene smell.
    • GEOTEXTILE Geotextiles are jute cloths helps to prevent soil erosion and landslides. The Geotextiles are laid along the river embankments, sides, hill slopes etc. to prevent soil erosion Sacking cloth also known as heavy goods, made from lower grades of jute fibres. Sacking is heavy, loosely woven cloth in plain or twill weave, weighting from 15-20 ozs per yard of different widths. Sacking cloth is used for jute bags to pack food grains, sugar and Cement etc. in a weight range from 50 to 100 kg. The different qualities of this category are A. Twill, B. Twill, hy Cees, D.W Flocer, Cement Bags etc.
    • JUTE USE Serim cloth is an extremely light weight Hessian cloth. It is used in the felt industry to reinforce the non-woven fabric. It is also used for strengthening paper with lamination. Tobacco Sheets Tobacco sheets are made with Hessian cloths used for wrapping tobacco leaves for safe transit. Hessian tapes and Gaps Hessian tapes and Gaps are made with Hessian cloth. Hessian cloth is woven with gaps at regular intervals and the cloths cut between the gaps to make small width taps.
    • JUTE USE Serim cloth is an extremely light weight Hessian cloth. It is used in the felt industry to reinforce the non-woven fabric. It is also used for strengthening paper with lamination. Tobacco Sheets Tobacco sheets are made with Hessian cloths used for wrapping tobacco leaves for safe transit. Hessian tapes and Gaps Hessian tapes and Gaps are made with Hessian cloth. Hessian cloth is woven with gaps at regular intervals and the cloths cut between the gaps to make small width taps.
    • JUTE USE Decorative Items Several decorative items, toys, wall hanging, paper, decorative bags, table lamps, furniture, and many more is made from jute fabrics. Hessian tapes and Gaps Hessian tapes and Gaps are made with Hessian cloth. Hessian cloth is woven with gaps at regular intervals and the cloths cut between the gaps to make small width taps.
    • FLOORING
    • RUGS
    • TABLE MATS
    • TABLE RUNNER
    • FOR FURNITURE
    • Thanks