CUBISM

THE FIRST FORM OF ABSTRACT ART
CUBISM-the movement
 Cubism was a 20th century avant-garde art

movement, pioneered by Pablo Picasso and
Georges Braque, ...
CUBISM-the movement
1. Analytic Cubism, was both
radical and influential as a short but highly
significant art movement be...
CUBISM-Phases
CUBISM-Characteristics
Characteristics:
1.Objects are shown from multiple perspectives
at once.
2.Everything is portrayed ...
CUBISM- Most Popular Cubist
Artists

Pablo Picasso

Georges Braque

Juan Gris
CUBISM-Cubist Painting
Some Examples of Cubist Painting

Portrait of
Daniel-Henry
Kahnweiler
by Picasso

Women with
a Guit...
CUBISM-Influences
Influences on Cubism

Fang Mask 56 –
the Fang tribe

Les Demoiselles
d’Avignon – Pablo
Picasso – 1907

*...
CUBISM-in Other Field

Sculpture Woman's
Head, Otto
Gutfreund,

A part of the
enormous
Creators of the
Bulgarian State
mon...
CUBISM-period
CUBISM-early years
Early Years
Pablo Picasso was born on October 25, 1881 in
Malaga, Spain.
Picasso’s father José Ruiz y B...
CUBISM-blue period

The Blue
Period
1901 - 1904
CUBISM-blue period
* Characterized by a
predominantly blue palette and
subjects focusing on outcasts,
beggars, and prostit...
CUBISM-blue period
The composition is
•stilted,
•the space
compressed
•the gestures stiff
•and the tones
predominantly blu...
CUBISM-blue period

The Blind Man's Meal (1903)

Wo m a n with Ac ro w (1903)
Toledo Museum of Art
CUBISM-rose period

The Rose
Period
1901 - 1904
CUBISM-rose period
Picasso's palette brightened, the
paintings dominated by pinks and
beiges, light blues, and roses.
His ...
CUBISM-rose period

Family of Saltimbanques (1905)

Boy with a Pipe
CUBISM-The Beginnings
* In late 1906, Inspired by Cézanne's
flattened depiction of space, and
working alongside his friend...
CUBISM

Gertrude Stein (1906)

Self-Portrait with Palette (1906)
CUBISM- Les Demoiselles
d'Avignon
CUBISM
Analytic Cubism
(1909–1912)
CUBISM- Analytic

* The period of cubism where it’s really hard to tell what
anything is, and who the artist is.
* objects...
CUBISM

Accordionist (1911)

The Guitar Player (1910)
CUBISM
Synthetic cubism
(1912–1919)
CUBISM-Synthetic
* In 1912, Picasso took the conceptual
representation of Cubism to its logical
conclusion by pasting an a...
CUBISM

Woman in an Armchair (1913)

Portrait of a Girl (1914)
(1914
CUBISM

Harlequin and Woman with a
Necklace (1917)

Glass and Bottle of Suze (1912)
CUBISM
After Cubist Period
CUBISM

* After the war, Picasso, reflecting
society's disillusionment and shock with
the technological horrors of the war...
CUBISM

Three musicians (1921)
CUBISM

Guernica (1937)
CUBISM
Sculptor Picasso
CUBISM-Sculptures
Picasso explored other artistic styles to
express himself, including sculpture.
Mandolin and Clarinet an...
CUBISM

Mandolin and Clarinet
CUBISM

Mandolin and Clarinet
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Cubism in fashion and art

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  • Picasso’s Blue Period (1901–1904) consists of somber paintings rendered in shades of blue and blue-green, only occasionally warmed by other colors. In his austere use of color and sometimes doleful subject matter—prostitutes and beggars are frequent subjects—Picasso was influenced by a trip through Spain and by the suicide of his friend Carlos Casagemas. Blindness is a recurrent theme in Picasso’s works of this period,
  • Shortly after moving to Paris from Barcelona, Picasso began to produce works that were suffused in blue. This particular pigment is effective in conveying a sombre tone. The psychological trigger for these depressing paintings was the suicide of Picasso's friend Casagemas. The Blue Period work is quite sentimental, but we must keep in mind that Picasso was still in his late teens, away from home for the first time, and living in very poor conditions.
  • The most poignant work of the style is in Cleveland's Museum of Art, La Vie (1903), which was created in memory of a great childhood friend, the Spanish poet Casagemas, who had committed suicide. The painting started as a self-portrait, but Picasso's features became those of his lost friend. The composition is stilted, the space compressed, the gestures stiff, and the tones predominantly blue
  • In 1905-6, Picasso's palette began to lighten considerably, bringing in a distinctive beige or "rose" tone. The subject matter also is less depressing. Here are the first appearances by the circus performers and clowns . Picasso met Fernande Olivier, a model for sculptors and artists, in Paris in 1904, and many of these paintings are influenced by his warm relationship with her, in addition to his increased exposure to French painting.
  • Shortly after moving to Paris from Barcelona, Picasso began to produce works that were suffused in blue. This particular pigment is effective in conveying a sombre tone. The psychological trigger for these depressing paintings was the suicide of Picasso's friend Casagemas. The Blue Period work is quite sentimental, but we must keep in mind that Picasso was still in his late teens, away from home for the first time, and living in very poor conditions.
  • One of the premier works of this period is in Washington, D.C., the National Gallery's large and extremely beautiful Family of Saltimbanques dating to 1905, which portrays a group of circus workers who appear alienated and incapable of communicating with each other, set in a one-dimensional space.
    Garçon à la Pipe (English: Boy with a Pipe) is a painting by Pablo Picasso. It was painted in 1905 when Picasso was 24 years old, during his Rose Period, soon after he settled in the Montmartre section of Paris, France. The oil on canvas painting depicts a Parisian boy holding a pipe in his left hand and wearing a garland or wreath of flowers.
  • In late 1906, Picasso started to paint in a truly revolutionary manner. Inspired by Cézanne's flattened depiction of space, and working alongside his friend Georges Braque, he began to express space in strongly geometrical terms. These initial efforts at developing this almost sculptural sense of space in painting are the beginnings of Cubism.
  • Portrait of Gertrude Stein, 1906, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City. When someone commented that Stein did not look like her portrait, Picasso replied, "She will".
  • The work portrays five nude female prostitutes from a brothel on Avinyó Street in Barcelona. Each figure is depicted in a disconcerting confrontational manner and none are conventionally feminine. The women appear as slightly menacing and rendered with angular and disjointed body shapes. Demoiselles was revolutionary and controversial.
  • By 1910, Picasso and Braque had developed Cubism into an entirely new means of pictorial expression. In the initial stage, known as Analytical Cubism, objects were deconstructed into their components. In some cases, this was a means to depict different viewpoints simultaneously; in other works, it was used more as a method of visually laying out the FACTS of the object, rather than providing a limited mimetic representation. The aim of Analytical Cubism was to produce a conceptual image of an object, as opposed to a perceptual one.
  • In 1912, Picasso took the conceptual representation of Cubism to its logical conclusion by pasting an actual piece of oilcloth onto the canvas. This was a key watershed in Modern Art. By incorporating the real world into the canvas, Picasso and Braque opened up a century's worth of exploration in the meaning of Art.
  • This is apparent in Picasso's Glass and Bottle of Suze. Here, the work is a collage of separate elements glued into one complete composition. Picasso uses newspaper clippings, wallpaper and labels to create this work.
  • The three musicians and dog conjure a bygone period of bohemian life, enjoyed here by Picasso in the guise of a Harlequin flanked by two figures who may represent poet–friends of the artist's: Guillaume Apollinaire, who was recently deceased, and Max Jacob. The patterned flatness of the work is derived from cut–and–pasted paper, and stands in stark contrast to the sculptural monumentality of Picasso's Three Women at the Spring, also painted in the summer of 1921.
  • Guernica is a painting by Pablo Picasso, in response to the bombing of Guernica by German and Italian warplanes at the behest of the Spanish Nationalist forcesArguably Picasso’s most famous work is his depiction of the German bombing of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War—Guernica. This large canvas embodies for many the inhumanity, brutality and hopelessness of war. Guernica shows the tragedies of war and the suffering it inflicts upon individuals, particularly innocent civilians. This work has gained a monumental status, becoming a perpetual reminder of the tragedies of war, an anti-war symbol, and an embodiment of peace.
  • We rarely associate sculpture with Picasso. Picasso explored other artistic styles to express himself, including sculpture. Mandolin and Clarinet and Chicago Picasso are two examples of cubist sculpture.
  • Cubism in fashion and art

    1. 1. CUBISM THE FIRST FORM OF ABSTRACT ART
    2. 2. CUBISM-the movement  Cubism was a 20th century avant-garde art movement, pioneered by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, that revolutionized European painting and sculpture, and inspired related movements in music and literature.  Avant-garde is used to refer to people or works that are experimental or innovative, particularly with respect to art, culture, and politics.
    3. 3. CUBISM-the movement 1. Analytic Cubism, was both radical and influential as a short but highly significant art movement between 1907 and 1911 in France. 2. Synthetic Cubism, the movement spread and remained vital until around 1919, when the Surrealist movement gained popularity.
    4. 4. CUBISM-Phases
    5. 5. CUBISM-Characteristics Characteristics: 1.Objects are shown from multiple perspectives at once. 2.Everything is portrayed with geometric shapes. 3.It portrayed a “new way of seeing,” which infused observations and memories into paintings.
    6. 6. CUBISM- Most Popular Cubist Artists Pablo Picasso Georges Braque Juan Gris
    7. 7. CUBISM-Cubist Painting Some Examples of Cubist Painting Portrait of Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler by Picasso Women with a Guitar by Georges Braque Still Life with Fruit Dish and Mandolin, by Juan Gris
    8. 8. CUBISM-Influences Influences on Cubism Fang Mask 56 – the Fang tribe Les Demoiselles d’Avignon – Pablo Picasso – 1907 * African art has influenced many art movements * Motivated artists to create their own interpretations of what they saw * Themes adapted from African art * Distorted African masks influenced the earliest cubist paintings.
    9. 9. CUBISM-in Other Field Sculpture Woman's Head, Otto Gutfreund, A part of the enormous Creators of the Bulgarian State monument near Shumen Cubist House of the Black Madonna, Prague, Czech Republic
    10. 10. CUBISM-period
    11. 11. CUBISM-early years Early Years Pablo Picasso was born on October 25, 1881 in Malaga, Spain. Picasso’s father José Ruiz y Blasco was also a painter himself. He taught him the basics of formal and academic art training. Picasso attended many art schools during his childhood. He never finished his studies at the Academy of Arts in Madrid, dropping out after only a year.
    12. 12. CUBISM-blue period The Blue Period 1901 - 1904
    13. 13. CUBISM-blue period * Characterized by a predominantly blue palette and subjects focusing on outcasts, beggars, and prostitutes. * This particular pigment is effective in conveying a somber tone. * The psychological trigger for these depressing paintings was
    14. 14. CUBISM-blue period The composition is •stilted, •the space compressed •the gestures stiff •and the tones predominantly blue
    15. 15. CUBISM-blue period The Blind Man's Meal (1903) Wo m a n with Ac ro w (1903) Toledo Museum of Art
    16. 16. CUBISM-rose period The Rose Period 1901 - 1904
    17. 17. CUBISM-rose period Picasso's palette brightened, the paintings dominated by pinks and beiges, light blues, and roses. His subjects are saltimbanques (circus people), harlequins, and clowns, all of whom seem to be mute and strangely inactive. The generally upbeat and optimistic mood of paintings in this period is reminiscent of the 1899–1901 period.
    18. 18. CUBISM-rose period Family of Saltimbanques (1905) Boy with a Pipe
    19. 19. CUBISM-The Beginnings * In late 1906, Inspired by Cézanne's flattened depiction of space, and working alongside his friend Georges Braque, he began to express space in strongly geometrical terms. * These initial efforts at developing this almost sculptural sense of space in painting are the beginnings of Cubism.
    20. 20. CUBISM Gertrude Stein (1906) Self-Portrait with Palette (1906)
    21. 21. CUBISM- Les Demoiselles d'Avignon
    22. 22. CUBISM Analytic Cubism (1909–1912)
    23. 23. CUBISM- Analytic * The period of cubism where it’s really hard to tell what anything is, and who the artist is. * objects were deconstructed into their components. * In some cases, this was a means to depict different viewpoints simultaneously * In other works, it was used more as a method of visually laying out the FACTS of the object, rather than providing a limited mimetic representation. * The aim of Analytical Cubism was to produce a conceptual image of an object, as opposed to a
    24. 24. CUBISM Accordionist (1911) The Guitar Player (1910)
    25. 25. CUBISM Synthetic cubism (1912–1919)
    26. 26. CUBISM-Synthetic * In 1912, Picasso took the conceptual representation of Cubism to its logical conclusion by pasting an actual piece of oilcloth onto the canvas. * It was a further development of the genre, in which cut paper fragments— often wallpaper or portions of newspaper pages—were pasted into compositions. * Some of the finest Synthetic Cubist work, both visually and conceptually, are the collages.
    27. 27. CUBISM Woman in an Armchair (1913) Portrait of a Girl (1914) (1914
    28. 28. CUBISM Harlequin and Woman with a Necklace (1917) Glass and Bottle of Suze (1912)
    29. 29. CUBISM After Cubist Period
    30. 30. CUBISM * After the war, Picasso, reflecting society's disillusionment and shock with the technological horrors of the war, reverted to a Classicist mode of representation. * During the '30s Picasso became tangentially connected with the Surrealist movement. * After 1935 he returned to Classicism. * By the late '30s, Picasso was the most
    31. 31. CUBISM Three musicians (1921)
    32. 32. CUBISM Guernica (1937)
    33. 33. CUBISM Sculptor Picasso
    34. 34. CUBISM-Sculptures Picasso explored other artistic styles to express himself, including sculpture. Mandolin and Clarinet and Chicago Picasso are two examples of cubist sculpture.
    35. 35. CUBISM Mandolin and Clarinet
    36. 36. CUBISM Mandolin and Clarinet

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