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Child labour
Child labour
Child labour
Child labour
Child labour
Child labour
Child labour
Child labour
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Child labour

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child labour

child labour

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  • 1. CHILD LABOUR 1 PRESENTED BY: KOMAL PAPARAO MONIKA PARIHAR ASHIRVAD PATEL MAHEK PATEL SUNIL PRASAD VIPUL RAMNANDI VISHAL VASANI Tolani Institute of Management 11-01-2014
  • 2. INTRODUCTION 2 CHILD LABOUR IS THE PRACTICES OF HAVING CHILDREN ENGAGE IN ECONOMIC ACTIVITY, ON PART OR FULL-TIME BASIS. THE PRACTICE DEPRIVES CHILDREN OF THEIR CHILDHOOD, AND IS HARMFUL TO THEIR PHYSICAL AND MENTAL DEVELOPMENT. POVERTY, LACK OF GOOD SCHOOLS AND GROWTH OF INFORMAL ECONOMY ARE CONSIDERED AS THE IMPORTANT CAUSES OF CHILD LABOUR IN INDIA. Tolani Institute of Management 11-01-2014
  • 3. Article 24 of India's constitution prohibits child labour. Additionally, various laws and the Indian Penal Code, such as the Juvenile Justice (care and protection) of Children Act-2000, and the Child Labour (Prohibition and Abolition) Act-1986 provide a basis in law to identify, prosecute and stop child labour in India. Tolani Institute of Management 3 11-01-2014
  • 4. The Constitution of India in the Fundamental Rights and the Directive Principles of State Policy prohibits child labour below the age of 14 years in any factory or mine or castle or engaged in any other hazardous employment (Article 24). The constitution also envisioned that India shall, by 1960, provide infrastructure and resources for free and compulsory education to all children of the age six to 14 years. (Article 21-A and Article 45) Tolani Institute of Management 4 11-01-2014
  • 5. OBJECTIVE OF THE ACT 5  India formulated a National Policy on Child Labour in 1987. This Policy seeks to adopt a gradual & sequential approach with a focus on rehabilitation of children working in hazardous occupations.  It envisioned strict enforcement of Indian laws on child labour combined with development programs to address the root causes of child labour such as poverty. In 1988, this led to the National Child Labour Project (NCLP) initiative. .  This legal and development initiative continues, with a current central government funding of 602 crores, targeted solely to eliminate child labour in India. Despite these efforts, child labour remains a major challenge for India. Tolani Institute of Management 11-01-2014
  • 6. MAIN PROVISIONS OF THE ACT 6 The Factories Act of 1948: The Act prohibits the employment of children below the age of 14 years in any factory. The law also placed rules on who, when and how long can pre-adults aged 15–18 years be employed in any factory. The Child Labour (Prohibition and Regulation) Act of 1986: The Act prohibits the employment of children below the age of 14 years in hazardous occupations identified in a list by the law. The list was expanded in 2006, and again in 2008. Tolani Institute of Management 11-01-2014
  • 7. The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection) of Children Act of 2000: This law made it a crime, punishable with a prison term, for anyone to procure or employ a child in any hazardous employment or in bondage. The Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act of 2009: The law mandates free and compulsory education to all children aged 6 to 14 years. This legislation also mandated that 25% of seats in every private school must be allocated for children from disadvantaged groups and physically challenged children. The Mines Act of 1952: The Act prohibits the employment of children below 18 years of age in a mine. Tolani Institute of Management 7 11-01-2014
  • 8. PENALTY 8  If someone is caught red-handed, then he or she will have to pay a penalty of Rs. 20,000 for violating the Act. This in addition to jail-term. Tolani Institute of Management 11-01-2014

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