State-and-Local-Taxation-of-Banks-and-Financial-Institutions

1,107 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,107
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
128
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

State-and-Local-Taxation-of-Banks-and-Financial-Institutions

  1. 1. 47thBANK & CAPITAL MARKETS TAX INST IT U T Eannual STATE AND LOCAL TAXATION OF BANKS AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS Nutcracker Ballroom November 9th, 8:00am – 9:15am 47th ANNUAL BANK & CAPITAL MARKETS TAX INSTITUTE DISNEY CONTEMPORARY HOTEL Speakers: WALTER B. DOGGETT, III BRIDGET FOSTER ARTHUR TILLEY 47 BANK I N S T I T U MARKET th annual TA X & CAPITAL TE NOVEMBER 7-9, 2012 E.COM WWW.BANKTAX I N ST I T U T D I S N E Y C O N T E M P O R A RY H OT E L | ORLANDO
  2. 2. 10/26/2012 47th Annual Bank and Capital  Markets Tax Institute, Inc. STATE AND LOCAL TAXATION OF BANKS AND FINANCIAL  INSTITUTIONS Walter Doggett, Vice President of Taxes, E*Trade Bridget Foster, Partner, Deloitte Tax LLP Arthur Tilley, Senior Manager, Deloitte Tax LLP November 9, 2012 AgendaOverviewLegislative Updates and TrendsNexusCombined ReportingState NOLsAllocation and Apportionment 2 Legislative Updates and Trends 1
  3. 3. 10/26/2012 Legislative Updates and TrendsTrends in 2012  • Increased discussions around tax reform • Creating, extending, expanding credits for job creation,  investment and R&D  • Moving to a single sales factor apportionment formula and  market‐based sourcing  • Responses to Gillette and the MTC Election • Credits for hiring unemployed veterans  • Click‐through and affiliate sales/use tax nexus • State Budget Issues Continue  4 State of the States– State Budget Deficits • 31 states initially faced budget shortfalls for FY 2013, totaling $55  billion. – At least 43 states reduced services to their residents. Over 30  states have raised taxes to some degree. – Gap in the budget for all states is estimated to be: • $35.5 billion FY 2010 Midyear • $102 billion FY 2011 Center on Budget and Policy Priorities “Recession Continues to Batter State Budgets; State Responses Could Slow Recovery” 5 State of the States Sample of FY2012 Midyear Budget Gaps Size of Gap  Percent of FY2012  State at Midyear General Fund Budget California $930 million 27.8% Connecticut $285 million 17.1% Illinois $1.0 billion 18.5% New Jersey $550 million 37.5% New York $350 million 18.2% Washington $214 million 16.9% Center on Budget and Policy Priorities  “Recession Continues to Batter State Budgets; State Responses Could Slow Recovery” 2
  4. 4. 10/26/2012 State of the StatesFuture Pension Obligations– As of FY08, how many state pension plans were well‐ funded (80% funded)?– As of FY08, how many state pension plans were funded to  cover no more than 70% of their future liabilities? 7 State of the StatesFuture Pension Obligations– As of FY08, 29 state pension plans were well‐ funded (80% funded)– As of FY08, 13 state pension plans were funded to  cover no more than 70% of their future liabilities Source:  The Pew Center on the States  The Trillion Dollar Gap February 2010  8 State of the StatesLooming Pension Obligations– As of June 30, 2008, states pension plans had $2.8 trillion in  projected long term liabilities with more than $2.3 trillion of it  funded.– Twenty‐one states had funding levels below the desired 80%  mark.– Two states had less than 60% of the necessary assets on hand to  meet their long‐term pension liabilities. Source:  The Pew Center on the States  The Trillion Dollar Gap February 2010  9 3
  5. 5. 10/26/2012 State of the StatesHealthcare and Other Non‐pension Benefits– As of FY08, how many states have funded over 50% of their  projected retiree healthcare and other non‐pension benefits?– As of FY08, how many states have funded less than 1% of their  projected retiree healthcare and other non‐pension benefits? 10 State of the StatesHealthcare and Other Non‐pension Benefits– As of FY08, only Alaska and Arizona have funded over 50% of their projected retiree healthcare and other non‐pension benefits – As of FY08, 28 states have funded less than 1% of their  projected retiree healthcare and other non‐pension benefits and  21 had no funding Source:  The Pew Center on the States  The Trillion Dollar Gap February 2010  11 Legislative Updates and TrendsTax Policy Environment: States Managing Conflicting Business Tax Goals– New Jersey as an example: • Adopted throw‐out and the alternative minimum assessment in 2002  because of the deficits from the 2001 recession • Eliminated both in 2008 as concern over loss of jobs due to 2007  recession outweighed need to raise business taxesState Ballot Initiatives to Watch – California  • Increases income taxes on the wealthy and sales taxes  • Mandatory single sales factor – Arizona (increased sales and use tax rate) – South Dakota (sales tax rate increase)  12 4
  6. 6. 10/26/2012 Legislative Updates and TrendsJudicial Developments Illinois – Marriott International (Ill. App. Ct.) – 200% amnesty penalty  applies to “all taxes due” and not paid during the amnesty  period, which includes amounts under a federal audit that were  not determined until after the amnesty period closed Oregon – Oracle (Or. Tax Ct.) – Corporation’s gain from the sale of  subsidiaries stock is business income includable in its sales factor  denominator  • Neither the Due Process Clause nor the Commerce Clause bars the  state from taxing this gain.  13 Legislative Updates and TrendsCalifornia – Gillette and the Multistate Tax Compact– S.B. 1015 (enacted 27 June 2012) – Repeals all provisions related  to the Multistate Tax Compact (Compact), effective immediately  • Doctrine of election ‐‐ Legislative Counsel’s Digest – Legislature  “intended” that any election must be made on an originally filed  return  – Aimed to preclude the flood of anticipated amended returns – Gillette (Cal. App. Ct.) – On 9 August 2012 California appellate  court granted its own motion to rehear the case and in doing so  vacates its 24 July 2012 decision and opinion  • Vacated its 24 July 2012 ruling in which it had held that taxpayers are  allowed to elect to use the Compact’s apportionment formula and  that California is bound by the Compact until it withdraws from it  entirely  14 Legislative Updates and TrendsMichigan – New Corporate Income Tax  – MBT replaced by corporate income tax (CIT) effective 1 January  2012 – Unlike MBT, CIT imposed ONLY on entities classified as  corporations for federal income tax purposes – Short‐period returns for FY taxpayers New Jersey– Effective August 15, 2011, financial corporations, banks, credit  card companies, or similar businesses are considered to be doing  business in the state if they obtain or solicit business or receive  gross receipts from sources within New Jersey. 15 5
  7. 7. 10/26/2012 Legislative Updates and TrendsPennsylvania– H.B. 761 (enacted 2 July 2012) – Key changes:  • Adopt a single sales factor apportionment formula,  starting in 2013  • Time period for reporting changes to federal income  increased to 6 months (from 30 days)  • Eliminate the 12/31/2015 sunset of the R&D Tax Credit  • Increase the credit for hiring unemployed individuals to  $2,500  16 Legislative Updates and TrendsTennessee – Related Party Add‐backs – Under prior law, taxpayers only had to disclose the existence of  related party intangible expenses in order to claim a deduction  on the excise tax return – For tax years ending on or after 1 July 2012, taxpayers are  required to file an application requesting permission to deduct  intangible and related interest expenses Must show that the principal purpose of the transaction was not tax avoidance – Unless permission is granted, taxpayers will not be allowed to  deduct these expenses  17 Legislative Updates and TrendsRhode Island – Tax amnesty program runs 2 September through 15 November  2012 and it applies to tax liabilities due for any tax period ending  on or before 31 December 2011  • Waives penalties and 25% of interest for eligible participating  taxpayers Texas – Comptroller of Public Accounts revised its policy to allow  taxpayer to change or elect to take the cost of goods sold or  compensation deduction on an amended long form franchise tax  report  18 6
  8. 8. 10/26/2012 Legislative Updates and TrendsRates and Surcharges– Connecticut – 10% surcharge in 2009, 2010 and 2011 – Idaho –Beginning 1/1/12 corporate income tax rate reduced from  7.6% to 7.4%.– Illinois – increased corporate tax rate from 4.8% to 7% for 2011  through 2014; personal property replacement tax remains 2.5% – Massachusetts –Tax Years on or after 1/1/09 reduced rates for  corporations (8.25% from 8.75%) and financial institutions (9.5%  from 10%) – North Carolina – 3% surtax, based on tax payable by the  corporation, expired for tax years beginning on or after 1 January  2011  19 Legislative Updates and Trends  (Cont.) Rates and Surcharges– North Dakota – For tax years beginning after 12/31/10 reduced  rates for corporations (new graduated rates from 1.68%) and  financial institutions (6.5% from 7%) – Oregon – Beginning on or after 1/1/11 reduced top graduated tax  rate from 7.9% to 7.6%  20 Legislative Updates and Trends2012 Estimated Tax Payment Considerations – Exemptions  • Florida –On or after 1/1/11 increases the exemption for corporate  income tax and the franchise tax on banks and savings associations  from $5,000 to $25,000. On or after 1/1/13 exemption is increased  from $25,000 to $50,000– Installments  • Illinois – Required annual payment amount reverts back to 100% of  prior‐year tax due from 150% of prior‐year tax due for installments  due after 1 February 2012  21 7
  9. 9. 10/26/2012 Legislative Updates and TrendsState Hiring Credits – Alaska  • S.B. 136 (enacted 18 June 2012) – Effective 7/1/12 $2,000 tax credit  available for each veteran hired by a taxpayer for employment in Alaska  (increased to $3,000 if the veteran is disabled) – Delaware  • H.B. 275 (enacted 31 July 2012) – For employees hired between 1/1/12‐ 1/1/16 the tax credit for employers that hire veterans who served in overseas  conflicts since 2001 (credit equals 10% of the gross wages paid to the  qualified veteran)  • S.B. 271 (enacted 13 August 2012) – For employees hired after 6/30/12  withholding tax credit to employers that relocate at least 200 qualifying jobs  to the state (increased if 500 or more jobs relocated ) – Illinois  • S.B. 3241 (enacted 9 July 2012) – Tax credit equal to 20% of wages paid to  each qualified unemployed veteran hired by the employer, effective for each  taxable years ending on or after 31 December 2012 and on or before 31  22 December 2016  Legislative Updates and TrendsSales/Use Tax Nexus – California  • Cal. Regs. 1684 (effective 26 August 2012) – Expanded sales/use nexus  provisions aimed at remote retailers become effective 12/15/2012 – Colorado  • PLR‐12‐002 (30 May 2012) – Out‐of‐state internet retailer has nexus with  Colorado based on the activities of in‐state affiliate – District of Columbia  • A19‐0381 (approved 15 June 2012) – Expands the sale/use tax nexus  provisions to reach remote retailers and affiliates – Vermont  • H.B. 782 (enacted 15 May 2012) – tax department prohibited from imposing  sales and use tax on prewritten software accessed remotely (i.e., cloud  computing) effective for charges made after 31 December 2006 and before 1  July 2013 23 Nexus 8
  10. 10. 10/26/2012 The Reach of Economic Nexus• State supreme courts address economic nexus – Trademark  Companies • 1993:  Geoffrey, Inc. v. South Carolina Tax Commission, 313 S.C. 15  (1993), cert. denied 114 S. Ct. 550 (11/29/1993) – Quill applies only to sales/use tax nexus – Trademark holding company had income tax nexus despite lack of physical  presence • 2006: Lanco, Inc. v. Director of Taxation, 188 N.J. 380 (2006), cert.  denied 2007 U.S. LEXIS 7736 (6/18/2007) – IP holding company without physical presence had nexus in NJ from licensing  intangible property • 2009: Geoffrey, Inc. vs. Commissioner of Revenue, 453 Mass. 17  (2009), cert. denied 129 S.Ct. 2853 (6/22/2009)• U.S. Supreme Court denied certiorari in all these cases  25 The Reach of Economic Nexus• State supreme courts address economic nexus  • 1999: J.C. Penney Nat’l Bank v. Ruth E. Johnson, Commissioner of  Revenue, State of Tennessee 19 S.W.3d 831 (Tenn. App. 1999), cert.  denied 121 S. Ct. 305 (10/10/2000). – Credit card bank that solicited customers through the mails and over the Internet  but that had no physical presence in the state did not have nexus • 2006: Tax Commissioner of the State of West Virginia v. MBNA  America Bank, N.A. 220 W. Va. 163 (2006), cert. denied 127 S. Ct.  2997 (6/18/2007). – Providing credit card services to West Virginia customers creates income tax  nexus despite lack of in‐state physical presence. • Massachusetts Nexus based on minimum amount of interest from MA customers• U.S. Supreme Court denied certiorari in all these cases  26 The Reach of Economic Nexus• More states confirm economic nexus standard with cases on intangible holding companies/franchisors • Iowa — KFC Corporation v. Department of Revenue, 792 N.W.2d 308 (IA 2010) • Maine — ME Tax Alert, Volume 18, No.2 (Feb. 2008) • Maryland — The Classics Chicago, Inc. et. al. v. Comptroller of the Treasury, 985 A. 2d  593 (Md. Ct. Spec. App. 2010); Nordstrom, Inc. NIHC, Inc. v. Comptroller of the  Treasury, MTC No. 07‐IN‐00‐0317, MTC No. 07‐IN‐00‐0318 (Md. Tax Ct. 2010) • Louisiana — Cynthia Bridges, Secretary of the Department of Revenue, State of  Louisiana v. Geoffrey, Inc. 984 So. 2d 115 (2008); cert. denied 978 So. 2d 370 (2008)• More states confirm economic nexus for credit card issuer • Maine — ME Tax Alert, Volume 18, No.2 (Feb. 2008) • New York — Senate Bill S6807‐C (Fiscal Year 2008‐09 Budget) • Utah — Utah State Tax Commission Private Letter Ruling, Op. No. 06‐027 • Indiana — MBNA America Bank, N.A. & Affiliates, Petitioners, v. Indiana Department of  State Revenue, 895 N.E.2d 140 (Ind. Tax Ct. 2008) • NC contacting banks• CT - H.B. 6802, effective 9/8/09, legislates nexus based on substantial economic presence 27 9
  11. 11. 10/26/2012 Agency/Representative Nexus Agency/Representative Nexus• Scripto, Inc. v. Carson, Sheriff, et. al., 361 U.S. 806 (1959) • Use tax nexus case • Independent representatives selling pens as “jobbers” solicited sales and sent orders to  be accepted out of state • Having such agents or representatives in the state that help establish and maintain a  market created nexus• Tyler Pipe Industries, Inc. v. Washington State Department of Revenue, 483 U.S. 232 (1987) – U.S. Supreme Court Follows Scripto• Agency/Representative nexus – important points • Formal agency is not required; it is sufficient that there is a party in the state  representing the taxpayer and helping the taxpayer to establish and maintain a market • Scripto and Tyler Pipe are sales tax cases so physical presence was required – Having a representative in the state creates physical presence in the state • Although sales tax cases, agency/representative nexus applies to income taxes  – Because of P.L. 86-272, representatives who merely solicit sales of TPP, as in Scripto, do not create nexus – There are a limited number of income tax cases 29 Agency/Representative Nexus• Warranty Repairs and Service Contracts • MTC Nexus Bulletin 95‐1: Use of 3rd party independent contractors to perform warranty  repairs in‐state caused nexus and exceeded protection under P.L. 86‐272 • Dell Catalog Sales, L.P. v. Commissioner of Revenue Services, 48 Conn. Supp. 170 (2003) – held that warranty repairs by independent contractors did not create nexus – State failed to enter evidence of how many repairs were done in the state so court said state failed to prove that the presence was “substantial” – Court noted that although the contractor served an important need to service customers in Connecticut and benefitted the taxpayer financially, the missing ingredient was determining the frequency, if any, of the number of on-site service calls • Dell Catalog Sales LP v. Taxation and Revenue Department of the State of New Mexico,  145 N.M. 419 (2008)  – Out-of-state Internet / mail-order computer products seller (Dell Catalog) had sufficient in-state sales/use tax nexus through in-state computer repair services performed by an independent third-party (contracted by Dell) – Over 1100 service calls – In state repair service helped establish and maintain a market in the state • TSB‐A‐10(8)C (NY adv. opn.) – State provides guidance that P.L. 86‐272 protection is  exceeded when an out‐of‐state company: – sends agents/employees to perform installation, training and/or repairs 30 10
  12. 12. 10/26/2012 Agency/Representative Nexus • Internet sellers related to in-state brick and mortar retailers • Borders Online, LLC v. State Board of Equalization, 129 Cal. App. 4th 1179 (CAL. Ct. App.  2005)  and In the Matter of the Petition for Redetermination Under the Sales and Use Tax  law Barnes & Noble.com Case. ID. 89872 (S.B.E. 2002) – Retail stores create nexus for Internet affiliate if acting as an agent (e.g., accepting returns, providing coupons, etc.) • St. Tammany Parish Tax Collector v. Barnes and Noble, 481 F. Supp. 2d 575 (E.D. La. 2007)  – Entity with no physical presence does not have sales and use tax nexus merely because a related member has nexus. – The activities of Booksellers on behalf of Online were not of the order of magnitude necessary to establish that Booksellers marketed Onlines products on Onlines behalf. Booksellers and Online had no overlap between the companies management or directors and the companies did not hold themselves out as the same entity • SFA Folio Collections Inc. V. Tracy, Tax Commissioner, 73 Ohio St. 3d 119 (Ohio 1995)  – Retail store operations of Saks Fifth Avenue do not create use tax nexus for separate mail-order affiliate. • Idaho – Decision #20295, Idaho State Tax Comm. (1/10/08): Out-of-State retailer had nexus because it was owned/controlled by the same interests that owned/controlled an in- state subsidiary retailer – H.B. 360, signed 3/3/08: “Substantial nexus” exists if retailer has a franchisee or licensee operating under its trade name or owned by the same entity/corporation in Idaho 31 Agency/Representative Nexus – Investment in Partnerships• Revenue Cabinet v. Asworth Corporation, No. 2007-CA-002459-MR (Ky. Ct. App. 2/5/10); cert. denied, S. Ct. Dkt. 10-662 (U.S. 1/24/11) • An out‐of‐state corporation had acquired nexus in Kentucky due to its investment in a  pass‐through entity as a 99% limited partner.  • KY recognizes the flow‐through nature of partnerships and, accordingly, imposes state  income tax upon the partners rather than upon the partnership itself.  • The Court held that the corporation’s derivation of income from a partnership doing  business within and outside the State satisfied the Commerce Clause substantial nexus  test, as well as Due Process Clause minimum contacts requirement.  • BIS LP, Inc. v. Director, Division of Taxation, 25 N.J. Tax 88 (2009)  • A holding companys limited partner interest in a New Jersey partnership did not  subject it to the state corporation business tax for the 2003 tax year at issue. • The holding company did not have a sufficient constitutional presence in New Jersey to  create nexus as a result of its limited partnership interest: – was not a general partner in the partnership; – did not have control of the partnerships business; – did not have a place of business in New Jersey; and – did not have employees, agents, representatives, or property in New Jersey, even though it received 100% of its income from the limited partnership interest and even if the partnership distribution was deemed a "business receipt.” 32 Legislated Nexus 11
  13. 13. 10/26/2012 Legislated Nexus• States legislating nexus ‐ examples • Michigan, substantial nexus if: – Active solicitation and $350,000 of Michigan sales, or – Physical presence for more than one day • New York State nexus for credit card banks if: – 1,000 or more New York card holders; – 1,000 or more merchants; – 1,000 or more combined card holders and merchants; or – $1 M of combined card holder and merchant receipts. » New York City – conforms to the New York State provisions (A.B. 8867) • California – “Doing business” within the state if: – Sales in state exceed lesser of $500K or 25% of total sales; – Real and tangible property in the state exceeds the lesser of $50K or 25% of  property; or – Payroll in state exceeds the lesser of $50K or 25% of total payroll. – The sales, property and payroll of the taxpayer includes the taxpayer’s pro rata or  distributive share of pass‐through entities (partnerships or “S” corporations) – See, General Information on New Rules for Doing Business in California, Cal FTB  (3/4/11)  Legislated Nexus• States legislating nexus – examples (cont’d) • Washington B&O Tax – more than $50,000 of property in the state;  – more than $50,000 of payroll in the state;  – more than $250,000 of receipts from the state; or  – if at least 25% of the taxpayer’s total property, payroll, or receipts are in the state. • Texas margin tax – Statute asserts it is not an income tax subject to P.L. 86‐272 Expanded state tax nexus (cont’d)• Sales tests are subject to P.L. 86‐272• Expanded nexus allows state to tax more out‐of‐state companies• Expanded nexus can limit the operation of sales throw‐back and throw‐out  rules• What are the limitations on expanded nexus? • U.S. Supreme Ct. — “substantial nexus” requirement – Facts and circumstances test – Denial of certiorari in intangible holding company and credit card bank cases  (twice) • Have the states gone too far — yet? – Need for revenue may drive positions • For a service provider, will having a customer in the state, without more, result in nexus? • Will the state courts impose restraint? – Federal court review barred beyond Supreme Court discretionary review 12
  14. 14. 10/26/2012 Combined Reporting Combined Reporting– Combined reporting is a method of apportionment • Combined reporting is a tax return apportionment methodology for a  company with sufficient nexus • The methodology uses “combined income” and “combined  apportionment factors” to determine the tax for such a company • A single return is usually filed to report the tax for all members of the  group that have sufficient nexus • The combined return is not a tax filing for the entire combined group 38 Combined Reporting (cont.)– A combined report is not a consolidated return • A consolidated return is generally an elective filing that allows certain  entities to be treated as a single taxpayer • Unity is generally not a condition to filing a consolidated return– A combined report is not necessarily prepared on the basis of  legal entities– A single legal entity may contain activities that constitute parts of  more than one unitary group 39 13
  15. 15. 10/26/2012 Separate v. Consolidated v. Combined Separate Consolidated CombinedEach company files and Federal consolidated Combined reporting is areports its own taxable means one single return for method of calculatingincome all entities in group group’s income• No loss offset from one • States vary in use and • Members of a unitary group company to another meaning of this term that have nexus with the taxing state• Nexus applied to each • Some follow federal – group’s • Apportion group’s combined separate entity consolidated income and business income to the taxing combined in-state state on the basis of apportionment factor combined apportionment factors • Others require separate • Then add non-business company calculations, then income that is allocated to the add them up specific state 40 Combined v. Separate Filing Combined Separate No Income Tax Requires Unitary filing for FSI 41 Definition of a Unitary Business 14
  16. 16. 10/26/2012 Unitary Business Standards– Most states define a unitary group as broadly as permitted under  the U.S Constitution • The Three unities test: Unity of ownership, operation, and use • Indicators of interdependence: – Flow of value between members – Economies of scale – Centralized management– States are free to adopt a standard that requires more  interdependence than required by the U.S. Constitution • E.g., Arizona, Colorado 43 Arizona – Unitary Business Standards– Ariz. Admin. Code §R15‐2D‐401(A) • “An entity, group of entities, or components of an entity is not a  unitary business for apportionment purposes unless there is actual  substantial interdependence and integration of the basic operations  of the business carried on in more than one taxing jurisdiction.” • Threshold characteristics of unitary business: – Collective ownership of more than 50% of voting stock – Shared common management – Reconciled accounting systems • Must also show “substantial operational integration” – Based on Arizona DOR v. Talley Industries, Inc., 182 Ariz. 17  (1994). 44 Unitary Business StandardsArizona– R.R. Donnelly & Sons Co., et al. v. Ariz. Dept. of Rev., 224 Ariz. 254  (2010), rev. denied Ariz. Sup. Ct. No. CV‐10‐0223‐PR (Nov. 30,  2010).   • Arizona Court of Appeals concluded that a printing company must  include its trademark subsidiary in its combined return, but could  exclude its accounts receivables and investment subsidiaries   • True operational integration beyond administrative and accessory  functions was necessary for entity to be included in combined group – Trademarks were used on shipping labels and invoices and were  deemed a core part of taxpayer’s operations – Accounts receivable subsidiary and investment subsidiary were  deemed accessory 45 15
  17. 17. 10/26/2012 Unitary Business Standards– Indicators of operational integration include: – The same or similar business conducted by components – Vertical development of a product by components, such as  manufacturing, distribution, and sales – Horizontal development of a product by components such as  sales, service, repair, and financing – Transfer of materials, goods, products, and technological data  and processes between components – Sharing of assets by components – Sharing or exchanging of operational employees by components– Opportunities may exist to argue that commonly controlled  corporations are or are not operationally integrated. 46 Unitary Business Standards  Colorado– In order to be included in the CO combined return CO Rev. Stat.  §39‐22‐303(11) requires 3 of the following 6 factors to exist for  the current year and the two preceding years: • Sales or leases by one affiliated member to another affiliated member  constitute fifty percent or more of the gross operating receipts of the selling  or purchasing member • Five or more of the following services are provided by one or more affiliated  member for the benefit of another affiliated member without an arm’s  length charge for the service: advertising and public relations services;  accounting and bookkeeping services; legal services; personnel services;  sales services; purchasing services; research and development services;  insurance procurement and servicing exclusive of employee benefit  programs; and employee benefit programs including pension, profit‐sharing,  and stock purchase plans.  • Twenty percent or more of the long‐term debt of one affiliated C corporation  is owed to or guaranteed by another affiliated C corporation.  47 Colorado– Colorado 6 factor test continued: • One affiliated C corporation substantially uses the patents, trademarks,  service marks, logo‐types, trade secrets, copyrights, or other proprietary  materials owned by another affiliated C corporation. • Fifty percent or more of the members of the board of directors of one  affiliated C corporation are members of the board of directors or are  corporate officers of another affiliated C corporation. • Twenty‐five percent or more of the twenty highest‐ranking officers of an  affiliated C corporation are members of the board of directors or are  corporate officers of another affiliated C corporation.– Newly formed corporation cannot meet this test and is not  included in Colorado combined return for first 2 years • Consolidated election allows immediate inclusion of new subsidiaries  with nexus 48 16
  18. 18. 10/26/2012 Forced Combined Reporting North Carolina – Forced Combination– Wal‐Mart Stores East, Inc. v. Sec. of Rev., 197 N.C. App. 30 (N.C.  App. May 19, 2009). • North Carolina Court of Appeals held that taxpayer was required to  file a North Carolina corporate income tax return on a combined  basis due to its use of complex REIT strategy, which served to distort  income earned in North Carolina – Operating merchants transferred their ownership in retail stores  to affiliated REITs, making lease payments to the REIT and taking  corresponding rent expense deductions for the payments – REITs recorded the rental income and then paid out the income  as dividends that were ultimately not taxed in North Carolina • State not required to show non‐arm’s‐length transactions • Department has authority to combine returns of related businesses if  taxpayer’s return does not disclose the “true earnings” from its North  Carolina business activity • 25% understatement penalty imposed 50 North Carolina – Forced Combination– Delhaize America, Inc. v. Lay, Secretary of Rev., 2011 NCBC 2 (N.C.  Super. Ct. Jan. 12, 2011). • Citing Wal‐Mart, North Carolina Superior Court affirmed  Department’s forced combination of an in‐state holding company and  one of its subsidiaries that held a chain of retail grocery store  operations – Department’s concern was related to treatment of fees and  royalties charged to the holding company by the subsidiary for  product development and design and the right to use some  intangibles – Taxpayer failed to show that corporate structure and  transactions had valid business purpose • However, court held that Department abused its discretion by  ordering taxpayer to pay 25% penalty after forcing combination • Imposition of penalties upheld on appeal. Delhaize America, Inc. v.  Lay, Secretary of Rev, N.C. Ct. App. (August 21, 2012).  51 17
  19. 19. 10/26/2012 North Carolina – New Combined  Reporting Statute– H.B. 619, effective Jan. 1, 2012, establishes process for  Department to eliminate intercompany transactions and/or  require combined reporting– Forced combination available when Department has reason to  believe that corporation conducts its trade or business in a  manner that fails to accurately report its state income carried on  in North Carolina through the use of • transactions that lack economic substance, or • intercompany transactions that are not at fair market value 52 North Carolina – New Combined  Reporting Statute (cont.)– Transaction has economic substance if: • The transaction, or the series of transactions of which the transaction  is a part, has one or more reasonable business purposes other than  the creation of North Carolina income tax benefits • The transaction, or the series of transactions of which the transaction  is a part, has economic effects beyond the creation of North Carolina  income tax benefits 53 Indiana– Forced Combination– Rent‐a‐Center East, Inc. v. Department, 952 N.E. 2D 387 (Ind. Tax  Ct. May 27, 2011). • Indiana Tax Court held that Department must comply with three  requirements to vary from Indiana’s standard sourcing rules and  require a combined adjusted gross income tax return • Under Ind. Code 6‐3‐2‐2(p), to force a combination Department must  show: – The taxpayer’s separate return does not fairly reflect Indiana  source income – The Departments alternative method is a reasonable method of  fairly allocating or apportioning the taxpayer’s income – If the Department chooses to require combination, the  Department considered alternatives to forced combination for  assessing the tax due • Department failed to show that it considered alternatives to forced  combination • The Indiana Supreme Court reversed and remanded  54 18
  20. 20. 10/26/2012 Indiana– Forced Combination– AE Outfitters Retail Co. v. Department, 2011 Ind. LEXIS 27 (Ind.  Tax Ct., Oct. 25, 2011: unpublished decision). • Before the department could mandate the retailer to report its tax  liability via a combined report with affiliates, it must first ascertain  whether application of any of the following methodologies would  result in an equitable allocation and apportionment:  – Separate accounting;  – Exclusion of any one or more factors, excepting the sales factor  for tax years between January 1, 2007, and January 1, 2011;  – Inclusion of any one or more additional factors; or  – Employment of any other reasonable method that would  effectuate “an equitable allocation and apportionment of the  taxpayer’s income.”  55 Joyce v. Finnigan Joyce v. Finnigan– Fundamental question is whether the group as a whole is the  taxpayer for purposes of establishing nexus or each individual  member of the combined group is evaluated separately. • Principal issue is throw‐back; are sales thrown back based on  whether the selling member has nexus in the destination state or if  any member of the group has nexus in the selling state. • If Joyce state (throw‐back based on selling member’s nexus), then  sales into state by member not having nexus in the state are not in  the sales factor numerator • If Finnigan state (throw‐back based on nexus by any member), how  are sales accounted for in sales factor numerator if seller does not  have nexus?– States expanded nexus rules are reducing the situations where  sellers do not have nexus. 57 19
  21. 21. 10/26/2012 Joyce/Finnigan Joyce Finnegan 58 Combined Returns and the Federal  Consolidated Return Regulations Combined Returns and the Federal  Consolidated Return Regulations– State adoption of the federal consolidated return regulations (“CRRs”) is  mixed: • Some states adopt essentially all the CRRs • Some states adopt some of the CRRs – Usually the deferred intercompany transaction rules under Reg. § 1.1502‐13 and occasionally some of the other rules  • Some states adopt none of the CRRs– States that do not adopt the deferred intercompany transaction rules under  Reg. § 1.1502‐13 provide for the “elimination” of intercompany transactions • Little guidance on what it means to eliminate an intercompany transaction – Presumably, no deferred gain and basis carries over • If a consolidated election is made in Florida, the CRRs are followed except  that intercompany transactions may be taken into account for  apportionment purposes 60 20
  22. 22. 10/26/2012 Approximate Conformity to CRRs Combined – Follows CRRs Combined – Follow  some CRRs;  usually  ‐13 i/c transaction rules Combined – Not follow CRRs or  unclear Separate No Income Tax 61 Combined Returns and the Federal  Consolidated Return Regulations– Some provisions of the CRRs (beyond § 1.1502‐13) that can impact the  combined tax liability • Investment adjustments to stock basis under Reg. § 1.1502‐ 32 • Reg. § 1.1502‐ 80 – Turns off IRC § 304 for acquisitions of stock in intercompany  transactions – Turns off IRC § 357(c) (gain for liabilities in excess of basis for certain  tax‐free transactions) in intercompany transactions  • Reg. § 1.1502‐ 90 through 99 dealing with the application of IRC § 382  (limitation on NOLs following an ownership change) • Reg. § 1.1502‐ 34 aggregates ownership of subsidiary by members of the  group for purposes of meeting 80% ownership test in – IRC § 351 – IRC § 332– Even if CRRs are not applicable, gains may be avoided under state’s  intercompany elimination rules, but not always 62 Combined Returns and the Federal  Consolidated Return Regulations– CRRs do not provide for deferral of intercompany transactions between a  member of the group and a partnership in which a member is a partner– Cal. Reg. § 25137‐1 provides for elimination of apportionment factors  attributable to such transactions • Uncertain application where the transaction is between a partnership that  has a partner that is a member of the group but the transaction is with a  member that is not a partner • FTB Notice 2011‐01 – Advises that certain arrangements with a partnership involving “abusive  sales factor manipulation” are “tax avoidance transactions” and “listed  transactions” – Notice describes arrangements or transactions designed to improperly  inflate the sales factor denominator and thereby reduce a taxpayer’s  California apportionment percentage.   63 21
  23. 23. 10/26/2012 District of Columbia District of Columbia– Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Support Act of 2011 – Became law on September 14, 2011– Effective for tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2011,  unitary combined reporting is required for calculating D.C.  corporation franchise tax 65 District of Columbia– World‐Wide election– 3‐factor apportionment– Sales factor will be double weighted– Silent on Joyce/Finnigan • Appears to be more like Joyce 66 22
  24. 24. 10/26/2012 District of Columbia– Water’s‐edge group will include: • Corporations formed in any state, DC, or any US territory or  possession • A member, regardless or where formed, if the average of its property,  payroll, and sales factors within the US is 20% or more • A member that is a DISC, FISC, or an export trade corporation • A member shall include business income that is effectively connected  with a US trade or business subject to federal income tax • Any member that is a CFC, to the extent of Subpart F income • A member resident in a country that does not have a comprehensive  income tax treaty with the US and earns more than 20% of its  income, directly or indirectly, from intangible property or service‐ related activities that are deductible against the business income of  other members of the waters‐edge group, to the extent of that  income • A member doing business in a tax haven 67 Rhode IslandRhode Island – Pro forma combined report required for 2011 and 2012 – At minimum, the combined report must include the following:  • The difference in tax owed as a result of: (1) filing a combined report  versus separate entity returns, and (2) using a single sales factor  formula versus an equally weighted three factor formula;  • If any individual member does not have nexus with the state,  taxpayer must compute its sales factor comparing Joyce and Finnigan 68 State Net Operating LossesArizona– NOL carryforward period extended to 20 years (from 5 years), applicable to NOLs arising in taxable periods beginning from and after 12/31/2011California – NOL deduction suspended for 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011 Illinois– Net loss deduction suspended for a tax year after 31 December  2010 and prior to 31 December 2014 (except for S corporations)  • Amended the net loss deduction (NLD) suspension to allow a  deduction not to exceed $100,000, for a tax year ending on or after  31 December 2012 and prior to 31 December 2014  69 23
  25. 25. 10/26/2012 State Net Operating LossesMaine – NOL deduction suspended for tax years 2009, 2010 and 2011 North Carolina— NOL carryforwards not reduced in year of loss by non‐taxable  income.  Carryforwards continue to be reduced by non‐taxable  incomePennsylvania– 2010 and thereafter, cap on NOL is the greater of $3 million or  20% of taxable income Wisconsin– Allows combined groups to share pre‐2009 net business loss  carryforwards incurred by group members, effective for tax years  ending after 31 December 2011, with certain limitations  70 Allocation and Apportionment Allocation and ApportionmentSales factor changes – Single sales factor fully phased‐in: Indiana, South Carolina – Single sales factor being phased‐in: Minnesota, New Jersey, New  York City, Utah, Virginia (manufacturers – elective for tax years  beginning on or after 1 July 2011), Virginia (retail companies – mandatory for tax years beginning on or after 1 July 2012) – Single sales factor (elective) effective tax years beginning on or  after January 1, 2011: California – Finnigan and market‐based  sourcing (but taxpayer must use cost of performance sourcing if it  uses three‐factor double weighted sales factor apportionment  formula) – Single sales factor election not available to trade or business  described in Cal. Rev. & Tax Code Section 25128(b) (financials)– Weight of sales factor increased: Alabama, District of Columbia 72 24
  26. 26. 10/26/2012 Allocation and ApportionmentAdoption of market‐based sourcing – Alabama Throw Out/Throwback – Alabama – Throwback rule effective 1 January 2011 Joyce/Finnigan – California – Switched to Finnigan effective 1 January 2011  73 Move to Market Sourcing–Costs of Performance  (“COP”) reflects taxpayer’s activities; thus,  market‐based sourcing better serves the purpose of the sales  factor–Balances the origin‐based property and payroll factors–Costs of Performance is too difficult to determine–Costs of Performance may penalize in‐state companies–Non‐TPP sales now are significant component of the economy–Increased certainty for taxpayers selling services and intangibles–The all‐or‐nothing approach is unfair 74 Move to Market Sourcing– More states are adopting market sourcing for sales of other than  tangible personal property (“TPP”) • Retain Costs of Performance rules but turn to alternative  apportionment • Adoption of industry‐specific rules • Adoption of specific rules for sales of intangibles or services • Legislative repeal of COP rules and adoption of market sourcing rules  for all sales of other than TPP 75 25
  27. 27. 10/26/2012 Move to Market Sourcing• Alternative Apportionment • On audit, several states have been invoking alternative  apportionment to achieve market sourcing where costs of  performance sourcing results in zero sales being attributed to the  state.–Industry Specific Rules • Many states have adopted market sourcing for specific industries – Broker-dealers – Financial institutions » Under MTC’s 1994 apportionment provision, which has been adopted by more than 20 states, more than 70% of most institutions’ receipts are market-sourced » The MTC currently is revising that provision with the goal to market source additional receipts 76 Move to Market Sourcing–Many states have adopted market sourcing for specific limited  services • Mutual fund service providers–Many states have adopted market sourcing for sales of  intangibles • Oregon: receipts from sales, leasing, licensing, or franchising of real estate, personal property, or intangible property sourced to State if the property is used or located within Oregon. OAR § 150-314-665(4). • Massachusetts: income-producing activity related to licensing of intangibles is in State if the intangible property is used in Massachusetts. Mass. Gen. L. § 38(f); CMR § 63.38.1(9)(d)3. 77 Contacts Bridget Foster Partner, Atlanta Deloitte Tax LLP 404‐942‐6510, brifoster@deloitte.com Arthur Tilley Senior Manager, Charlotte Deloitte Tax LLP 704‐251‐1551, atilley@deloitte.com Walter B. Doggett III Vice President Taxes E*Trade 703‐236‐8778, Walter.Doggett@ETrade.com 26
  28. 28. 10/26/2012 About this presentationThis presentation contains general information only and the speakers and their respective firms are not, by means of this presentation, rendering accounting, business, financial, investment, legal, tax, or other professional advice or services. This presentation is not a substitute for such professional advice or services, nor should it be used as a basis for any decision or action that may affect your business. Before making any decision or taking any action that may affect your business, you should consult a qualified professional advisor. The speakers and their respective firms shall not be responsible for any loss sustained by any person who relies on this presentation.  27

×