Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
B-1-Capital-MarketsFinancial-Servicces-Industry-Recent-Tax-Developments-II
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

B-1-Capital-MarketsFinancial-Servicces-Industry-Recent-Tax-Developments-II

182
views

Published on


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
182
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 47thBANK & CAPITAL MARKETS TAX INST IT U T Eannual B-1: CAPITAL MARKETS/ FINANCIAL SERVICES INDUSTRY RECENT TAX DEVELOPMENTS II Nutcracker Ballroom November 8th, 3:45pm – 5:15pm 47th ANNUAL BANK & CAPITAL MARKETS TAX INSTITUTE DISNEY CONTEMPORARY HOTEL Speakers: KEITH ANZEL DANIEL MAYO MARK H. PRICE FRANK STRONG 47 BANK I N S T I T U MARKET th annual TA X & CAPITAL TE NOVEMBER 7-9, 2012 E.COM WWW.BANKTAX I N ST I T U T D I S N E Y C O N T E M P O R A RY H OT E L | ORLANDO
  • 2. 10/26/2012 Bank & Capital Markets Tax  Institute Capital Markets/Financial Services  Industry Recent Tax Developments II November 8, 2012 Orlando, FL Keith Anzel Daniel Mayo MD ‐‐ Tax, Citigroup Global Markets, Inc. Principal, KPMG LLP Mark Price Frank Strong Principal, KPMG LLPP Principal, Deloitte LLP 1Agenda• Credit Card Fees• Dodd‐Frank and Derivatives• Basel III Rules and DTAs• CoCos• Soft‐Dollar Arrangement• Hedging 2Credit Card Fees • Proposed Safe‐Harbor Method Notice 2011‐99 – The notice provides a proposed revenue procedure under which a taxpayer may  use a simplified method to allocate OID on a pool of credit card receivables to an  accrual period.  – The method allocates to an accrual period an amount of the unaccrued OID based  on portion of the principal amount of receivables in the pool that is paid in the  period – The straight‐line aspect is essentially consistent with the allocation mechanism  under the rolling balance method that many taxpayers use. – The proposed revenue procedure essentially follows aspects of the rolling balance  method which the court in Capital One found to be reasonable. – While many taxpayers currently consider the transactions and fees that occur in  the current month in calculating the OID accrual, the proposed method, however,  considers only the balances as of the start of the month. – As described below, OID includes interchange, late fees, NSF/OTL fees (if the bank  honors the loan) and cash advance fees. 3 1
  • 3. 10/26/2012Credit Card Fees • Five Parties to a Typical Credit Card Purchase Transaction 1. Cardholder (Borrower) • Purchases goods (or services) using a loan via a credit card • Pays the  loan (i.e. full charge amount) to the issuing bank 2. Issuing Bank (Lender) • Enters into a credit card agreement with the cardholder • Makes loans to the cardholder by advancing funds to the merchant • Earns an interchange fee in connection with each cardholder’s  credit card purchase transaction • The Issuing Bank’s interchange fee is set by the Association 4Credit Card Fees • Five Parties to a Typical Credit Card Purchase Transaction 3.   Acquiring (Merchant) Bank • Processes credit card transactions on behalf of the merchant and  carries out the settlement process within the credit card system • Earns a merchant fee that is negotiated between the merchant bank  and its merchant 4. Merchant • Sells goods (or services) to the cardholder • Receives the purchase price net of merchant discount (which  includes the interchange fee, merchant fee and any fee payable to  the Association) 5. Association (Visa or Master Card) • Provides the infrastructure which enables credit card transactions  to take place • Earns a fee for facilitating the transaction 5Illustration from Capital One Financial Corporation v. Comm’r, 133 T.C. 136 (Sept. 21, 2009), aff’d, 659 F.3d 316 (4th Cir. 2011) 6 2
  • 4. 10/26/2012Credit Card Fees • Interchange Fee What is the character of the interchange fee? Who pays the fee? A. Pre‐Capital One Decision – IRS’ position: interchange fees are paid by the merchant bank, and  not by the credit cardholder (borrower).  These fees are set by the  Association, who are not parties to the lending transactions.   – Includible in income at the time the credit card transaction was  settled through the Association.  B. Capital One Decision – Interchange fees are a form of OID on the credit card loan.  The  issue price of the credit card loan is the price paid for the loan,  which is the amount authorized to be withdrawn from the issuing  bank’s account to be deposited with the merchant bank. 7Credit Card Fees • Merchant Fee Character: – Ordinary income – Fee for a service (processing the credit card transaction and  carrying out the payment to the merchant) Timing: – Current inclusion (includible in income) under the bank’s  method of accounting. 8Credit Card Fees • Annual Fee Character: – Ordinary income and not interest – Is not connected to a particular account balance and is imposed  regardless of whether a cardholder maintains a rolling balance or  pays in full every month – Is charged for all of the benefits and services available during the  year under the credit card agreement Rev. Rul. 2004‐52; 2004‐1 C.B. 973.  Timing: – Includible in income when due and payable  – Option for ratable inclusion method. Rev. Proc. 2004‐32; C.B. 988. 9 3
  • 5. 10/26/2012Credit Card Fees • Late Fee Rev. Proc. 2004‐33; 2004‐1 C.B. 989 – IRS allows the treatment of late fee as interest (OID) income on a  pool of credit card loans subject to the following requirements:  the late fee is separately stated on the cardholder’s account  when the late fee is imposed; and  under the applicable credit card agreement, no amount  identified as a credit card fee is charged for property or for  specific services performed by the card issuer for the benefit of  the cardholder.  10Credit Card Fees • Nonsufficient Funds Fee (NSF Fee) or Over the Limit Fee (OTL  Fee) – If the bank honors the request for a loan, then it is interest.  – If the bank declines the request for a loan, the fee imposed is  not for the use or forbearance of money.  It is ordinary income  includible in gross income when the NSF/OTL event occurs.  Rev. Rul. 2007‐1; 2007‐1 C.B. 265• Cash Advance Fee – Interest; compensation for the use or forbearance of money – Subject to Rev. Proc. 2004‐33 11Dodd‐Frank Amendment to Section 1256• Added section 1256(b)(2)(B) – The term “section 1256 contract” shall not include any interest rate  swap, currency swap, basis swap, interest rate cap, interest rate floor,  commodity swap, equity swap, equity index swap, credit default swap,  or similar agreement. • Enacted to resolve uncertainty under section 1256 for swap  contracts that are traded on regulated exchanges.  – “[Title 16] contains a provision to address the recharacterization of  income as a result of increased exchange‐trading of derivatives  contracts by clarifying that section 1256 of the Internal Revenue Code  does not apply to certain derivatives contracts transacted on  exchanges.” H.R Rep. No. 111‐517, at 879 (2010) (Conf. Rep.) 12 4
  • 6. 10/26/2012Dodd‐Frank and Proposed Section 1256 Regulations  • REG‐111282‐11 published on September 16, 2011 • Ordering Rule – A contract that is defined as both a notional principal contract in §1.446‐3(c)  and as a section 1256 contract in section 1256(b)(1) is treated as a notional  principal contract and not as a section 1256 contract.  Prop. Reg. §1.1256(b)‐1(a). • Definition of Regulated Futures Contracts  – A regulated futures contract is a section 1256 contract only if the contract is a  futures contract – • as defined in section 1256(g)(1); and • is not required to be reported as a swap under the Commodity Exchange  Act. Prop. Reg. §1.1256(b)‐1(b). 13 Dodd‐Frank and Proposed 2011 NPC Regulations • REG‐111283‐11 published on September 16, 2011 • Definition of NPC – Current Definition:  a financial instrument that provides for  the payment of amounts by one party to another at  specified intervals. – Proposed Definition: a financial instrument that requires  one party to make two or more payments to the  counterparty at specified intervals. • “Payment” includes an amount that is fixed on one date  and paid or otherwise taken into account on a later  date. 14 Dodd‐Frank and Proposed 2011 NPC Regulations • Included Contracts – Interest rate swaps, currency swaps, basis swaps, interest rate  caps, interest rate floors, commodity swaps, equity swaps,  equity index swaps, credit default swaps, weather‐related  swaps, and similar agreements that satisfy the requirements of  paragraph (c)(1)(i).  Prop. Reg. §1.446‐3(c)(1)(iii). • Special rule for credit default swaps – A credit default swap contract that permits or requires the  delivery of specified debt instruments in satisfaction of one leg  of the contract is an NPC if it otherwise meets the definition. 15 5
  • 7. 10/26/2012Dodd‐Frank and Proposed 2011 NPC Regulations• Excluded Contracts – Removed existing exclusion of section 1256 contracts and futures contracts – Added guarantees – Options and forward contracts are still not NPCs.  Prop. Reg. §1.446‐3(c)(1)(iv). 16Basel III Rules and Deferred Tax Assets (DTAs) • The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision is an international  supervisory group consisting of supervisors from the U.S., the U.K.  and 25 other nations.  • The Committee usually meets at the Bank of International  Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, where its permanent secretariat is  located.  Hence, the name “Basel” rules for its issuances.• Basel III rules were issued in response to financial crisis. – 2009: the Committee started issuing consultative documents – December 2010: the Committee issued the “Base III” rules. – Mid‐2011: the Committee  made further revisions and refinements. • Not legally binding but the G‐20 countries, including the US,  endorsed Base III rules and are expected to implement the reforms  into national law commencing on January 1, 2013. 17Basel III Rules and DTAs • More restrictive capital and risk‐weighted asset (RWA)  requirements – Increased quality of capital (predominantly common equity) – Increased quantity of capital• Introduction of leverage ratio – Liquidity coverage ratio – Net stable funding ratio• Introduction of a conservation buffer and a countercyclical buffer  range  (for the banks to have capital coverage in times of distress)• To be phased‐in the next years starting 2013 but the majority of  the changes will be phased‐in by 2019 18 6
  • 8. 10/26/2012Basel III Rules and DTAs 19Basel III Rules and Deferred Tax Assets (DTA)  20Basel III Rules and DTAsCurrent Rules• A net DTA is allowed to the extent of the lower of 1. 10% of the Total Regulatory Capital 2. The amount that can be used in one subsequent year• A net DTA can be reduced by a carryback prior to applying the  rules above• DTAs can generally be netted with DTLs• Certain DTLs in OCI can be either: 1. Adjusted out of regulatory capital as a net amount with the OCI item 2. Pulled out of OCI and netted against the DTA 21 7
  • 9. 10/26/2012Basel III Rules and DTAsUnder Basel III Rules• DTA is placed in the same category/grouping with mortgage servicing  rights (MSRs) and equity in certain financial institutions: 1. The total of these three items is limited to 15% of adjusted common  equity 2. Each item can not be more than 10% of adjusted common equity• DTAs for NOL and credit carry forwards are completely disallowed• Pro‐rata allocation of DTLs between disallowed DTAs and DTAs subject  to the above limitation• DTLs netted with goodwill, intangibles and defined pension assets are  not netted for the above limitation• Phase‐in begins in 2014 1. 20% per year through 2018 2. 2014‐2018 will require current and Basel III calculations 22Basel III Rules and DTAs Under Basel III Rules cont.• DTLs can only offset DTAs if they will offset in the tax liability  calculation of the jurisdiction in which they arise• DTAs will have a 250% Risk Weight – 20% Capital Requirement• Current rule carryback calculation allowed?• Will need to balance DTAs with MSRs and equity in certain  financial institutions• Shift from NOLs and credits to other DTAs 23Contingent Convertibles (CoCos)• Issued as debt with mandatory conversion into equity when the bank’s capital  declines to a specified level or when the bank fails to meet the viability standard  of the bank regulator.• Consistent with the capital requirement under Basel III rules and Dodd‐Frank – The Basel Committee issued a press release on January 13, 2011 directing  that “the terms and conditions of all non‐common Tier 1 and Tier 2  instruments issued by an internationally active bank must have a provision  that requires such instruments, at the option of the relevant authority, to  either be written off or converted into common equity” when the relevant  authority determines that the bank would otherwise become non‐viable. – Dodd‐Frank authorizes the Federal Reserve to require bank and  nonfinancial holding companies “to maintain a minimum amount of  contingent capital that is convertible to equity in times of financial distress.”   See Section 165(c) of the Act.• In February 2011, Credit Suisse issued CoCos designed to meet Basel III  standards.   – In 2009 and 2010, Lloyds Banking Group and Rabobank issued CoCos.    Issued pre‐Basel, these CoCos do not meet the capital requirement under  Basel III  (i.e. January 13, 2011 directive). 24 8
  • 10. 10/26/2012CoCos Issuer Credit Suisse Lloyds Rabobank Notes Buffer Capital Notes (BCN) Enhanced Capital Notes  Senior Contingent Notes  (ECN) (SCN) Issue Size USD 2 billion GBP 7 billion (32 series) EUR 1.25 billion Issue Date February 17, 2011 December 1, 2009 March 12, 2010 Ranking Subordinated Subordinated Senior Maturity 30 years – callable after 5  Dated ECNs: 10‐20 years 10 years years and 6 months Undated ECNs: perpetual Coupon 7.875% 1.5% ‐ 2.5% 6.875% Coupon Deferral No No No Conversion Fixed number of shares Fixed number of shares Non‐convertible:  automatic reduction (or  write down) to 25% of  Principal Conversion Price the higher of $20 or  59 Pence market price of share Trigger Type Accounting and Regulatory Accounting Accounting Trigger Level 7% of Core Tier 1 5% of Core Tier 1 7% Equity Capital/RWA 25CoCosTax Treatment• Only Lloyd’s ECNs have a discussion on US Taxation of ECNs: “LBG believes that the ECNs should be characterized as equity of  LBG for U.S. federal income tax purposes. . . It is also  possible that  the Dated ECNs could be characterized as debt for U.S. federal  income tax purposes.”• Certain contingent debt may be considered debt for tax purposes, if the  likelihood of the contingency occurring is remote.  For example, issuers  treat certain highly rated catastrophe bonds, or CLNs as to which the  reference obligations are highly rated, as debt.• In the case of a CoCo however, the contingency is based on the issuer’s  own credit.  This raises the question as to whether the instrument  contains creditors’ rights, a key indicia of debt.  In the one situation in  which the holder would want to enforce such rights, they are effectively  removed by the conversion. 26Soft Dollar Arrangement• An arrangement under which products and/or services other than  execution of securities transactions are obtained by an  adviser/money manager from or through a broker‐dealer in  exchange for direction by the adviser/manager of client brokerage  transactions to the broker‐dealer.  SEC Advisers Act Release No.  1469 (February 14, 1995).• The  broker‐dealer is paid in the form of commission as opposed  to direct cash payment (hard dollars) for the product and/or  service. This commission is referred to as “soft dollar.”• Section 28(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and SEC  interpretative releases provide what qualifying products and/or  services (“safe‐harbor”) that the adviser/manager can “pay‐up”  without violating his fiduciary duties to the client. 27 9
  • 11. 10/26/2012 Soft Dollar Arrangement Tax Treatment  • Treasury Letter addressed to Senator Schumer and signed by Andrew  Keyso, Associate Chief Counsel ‐ Income Tax & Accounting  Letter No. 2012‐0034, 2012 TNT 142‐19 (April 19, 2012)   – Treasury has not issued any specific guidance on the tax treatment of  income and expenses from soft dollar commissions – Treatment of income and expenses for financial or regulatory purposes  does not control – The tax rules on the reporting of income and expenses apply • Section 61 determines whether a taxpayer has received gross income • Section 451 determines the taxable year of inclusion • Section 461 determine the taxable year of deduction • NOTE: reporting of income and corresponding deduction may not be in the  same tax year Example:  If a broker‐dealer receives income from a soft dollar commission  in tax year 1, the broker‐dealer may not be entitled to a  deduction for the amount paid to the soft dollar service provider  until tax year 2 when the service is provided. 28Current Hedging Controversies Under Treas. Reg. § 1.446‐4• Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. v. Commissioner, Docket No: 23468‐10,  filed October 22, 2010.• Industry Issue Resolution process involving insurance companies’ hedging of  minimum guaranteed benefits under variable annuity policies. Disclaimer This presentation contains general information only and the respective speakers  and their firms are not, by means of this presentation, rendering accounting,  business, financial, investment, legal, tax, or other professional advice or  services.  This presentation is not a substitute for such professional advice or  services, nor should it be used as a basis for any decision or action that may  affect your business.  Before making any decision or taking any action that may  affect your business, you should consult a qualified professional advisor.  The  respective speakers and their firms shall not be responsible for any loss  sustained by any person who relies on this presentation. 30 10