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PPT from 2011 National CEO Co-op and Mutual Summit

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  • WelcomeAcknowledgementsThe Hon David Bradbury MP, Parliamentary Secretary to the TreasurerThe Gillard Government is a strong supporter of alternative business models, evident by the government’s recent competitive and sustainable banking package, which aims to build a new pillar in the banking system based on the combined competitive power of our mutual credit unions and building societiesThe co-operative model has proved to be one of the most enduring and successful ways of running a business for the last 150 years. They are “of the most obvious significance to a world looking for alternative ways of doing business. People are looking for institutions they can trust.” Bob Debus, Patron IYC 2012Colleagues from the IYC SC and its reference group as well as Social Business AustraliaChairs, Directors, CEO’s and Senior Executives from some of our Top 100 Co-operatives, Credit Unions and Mutual's in this Country
  • WelcomeMy name is Trent BartlettI am the Chair of the IYC SC and Social Business Australia.In a moment, it will my pleasure to invite Louise Plescthler – CEO of AbacusAs many of you would know, Abacus is the industry body representing the Australian mutual sector, comprising credit unions, mutual building societies and friendly societies.Before I invite Louise up, I would just like to say how wonderfully supportive Louise and her organisaiton has been toward our IYC SC and SBE efforts.The SC and SBA are extremely grateful to her in supporting Daniel Newlan, Senior Adviser , Public and Policy Affairs tireless efforts in our joint cause.Thank you.. Would you please welcome Louise.Acknowledgements Traditional Owners of the landThe Hon David Bradbury MP, Parliamentary Secretary to the TreasurerThe Hon Bob Debus AM, Former Attorney General and Minister for Co-operatives for NSWAndrew Coogan, Senior Adviser, Office for the Not for Profit Sector, Dept. of Prime Minister and Cabinet,Tim Beale, Senior Adviser to the TreasuryColleagues from the IYC SC and its reference group as well as Social Business AustraliaChairs, Directors, CEO’s and Senior Executives from some of our Top 100 Co-operatives, Credit Unions and Mutual's in this Country
  • Today represents a landmark event - Australian co-operative and mutual businesses including co-ops, credit unions, health mutuals, employee owned businesses and co-operative lenders have gathered for the first time in recognition of the important contribution of co-operatives to Australian society and the economy.More than 40 CEOs and Chairs from businesses in the Top 100 list of Australian co-operatives, credit unions and mutuals.
  • Who we are and how it has come to be?Why CSL is a locomotive.
  • ChallengesOne year opportunity – awareness and marketing campaignLack of AwarenessTax SummitLack of co-operationDo not have a common bond (PT)Brand needs redevelopment (PT)Strength is the common bond (PTG)Credit Unions Mutuals – Health, Automotive IndusrtyCo-ops – all shorts of shapes and sizea
  • Peer GroupMany never had reason to come together beforeIYC has the potential to unite us?One third of the Top 100 here in this country are here.New wave – health, environmental, renewable energy (HWC – Simon’s Slide)Sectors represented include: agriculture, consumer/retail, automotive and motoring, banking, co-operative finance, housing, childcare, trade suppliers, transport, health insurers and health providers.Including two of Australia’s largest agri-businesses – farmer owned co-ops Murray Goulburn and Co-operative Bulk Handling; Capricorn Society, the seed funder of Social Business Australia and a business that helps 13,000 small businesses in 3 countries operating as a co-op as well as having a mutual that protects its members; West Belconnen Health Co-operative, the most recently opened wholly community owned health service provider; and one of the oldest continuously operating community owned retail businesses in the country, Macleay Regional Co-operative - 105 years old. We also have a number of peak bodies in attendance – ABACUS Australian Mutuals, Co-operatives Australia, Social Business Australia and the Regional Development Authority of the Mid North Coast Region.We have representatives of the Departments of Treasury and PM&C 
  • Unique opportunityThe rest of the world is doing stuffWhat are we doing?Collaborative approach to a major project/opportunityPeer GroupMany never had reason to come together beforeIYC has the potential to unite us?Fourth Sector
  • Plays a pivotal role in strengthening cooperatives. Some of the activities that academia could engage in include: research on the links between cooperative contributions and achievements of development goals; research and dissemination of cooperative activities, good practices and lessons learned; inclusion of cooperatives in curriculum and educational programmes are some of the activities.Private Sector: Cooperatives work alongside, and are considered by some to be part of, the private sector. The private sector, including Fair Trade, work with cooperatives as suppliers and buyers. As partners they can engage in communications and activities linking common goals such as: disseminate information on the IYC; participate in the National Committee; organise training programmes, research and development initiatives; present experiences in dealing with cooperativesProvides the political and regulatory eco-systems for cooperatives to thrive and grow (or not). Some of the activities that government could engage in include: supporting the UN with its International Year given the other UN Agenda’s Australia may have; policy development enabling greater cooperative contributions and achievements of development goals; acknowledging the contribution of co-operatives and co-operators to Australia;consider the establishment of a Co-operatives Commission (ala Tony Blair in the UK) with the aims of; determining new strategies, structures and approaches for a more vibrant co-op sector helping government with public sector initiatives and reforms; help government with employment creation opportunities;
  • It was launched in the 2010 Conservative manifesto and described by The Times as "an impressive attempt to reframe the role of government and unleash entrepreneurial spirit".The stated priorities are:Give communities more powersEncourage people to take an active role in their communitiesTransfer power from central to local governmentSupport co-ops, mutual's, charities and social enterprisesPublish government data.
  • A big part of the problem lies with companies themselves, which remain trapped in an out-dated approach to value creation that has emerged over the past few decades. They continue to view value creation narrowly, optimizing short-term financial performance in a bubble while missing the most important customer needs and ignoring the broader influences that determine their longer-term success. How else could companies overlook the well-being of their customers, the depletion of natural resources vital to their businesses, the viability of key suppliers, or the economic distress of the communities in which they produce and sell? How else could companies think that simply shifting activities to locations with ever lower wages was a sustainable ·solution" to competitive challenges? Government and civil society have often exacerbated the problem by attempting to address social weaknesses at the expense of business. The presumed trade-offs between economic efficiency and social progress have been institutionalized in decades of policy choices.Companies must take the lead in bringing business and society back together. The recognition is there among sophisticated business and thought leaders, and promising elements of a new model are emerging. Yet we still lack an overall framework for guiding these efforts, and most companies remain stuck in a "social responsibility" mind-set in which societal issues are at theperiphery, not the core.The solution lies in the principle of shared value, which involves creating economic value in a way that also creates value for society by addressing its needs and challenges. Businesses must reconnect company success with social progress. Sharedvalue is not social responsibility, philanthropy, or even sustainability, but a new way to achieve economic success. It is not on the margin of what companies do but at the centreArguably, there are increasing numbers of people believing that it can give rise to the next major transformation of business thinking.
  • How Shared Value Differs from Corporate Social ResponsibilityCreating shared value (CSV) should supersede corporate social responsibility (CSR) in guiding the investments of companiesin their communities. CSR programs focus mostly on reputation and have only a limited connection to the business, makingthem hard to justify and maintain over the long run. In co~trast, CSV is integral to a company's profitability and competitiveposition. It leverages the unique resources and expertise of the company to create economic value by creating social value.
  • The Business Council of Australia is an association of the CEOs of 100 of Australia’s leading corporations with a combined workforce of one million people. It was established in 1983 as a forum for Australia’s business leaders to contribute to public policy debates to build Australia as the best place in which to live, to learn, to work and do business
  • My Name is Peter Tregilgas - Executive Officer Regional Development AustraliaMid North Coast (RDA MNC)Acknowledge:Traditional Owners of the Land I would like to acknowledge and pay respect to the traditional owners of the land on which we meet – (the Ngunnawal Peoples) and any indigenous persons present today.As we share our own knowledge, learning, and research I also pay respect to the knowledge embedded forever within the Aboriginal Custodianship of Country.Topic - Meeting the challengesObjective of Session:Understand that the key to all this to come together in an organised platform and speak with a common voice whilst respecting their diversityDiscuss Credentials – NFP/SE SectorWho/What is RDA & RDA Mid North Coast & why it is relevantDiscuss “meeting the challenges” and the opportunity of IYC
  • Firstly why should I talk about “Meeting the Challenges” for IYC 2012.In March 2002 as the Social Enterprise Manager for Adelaide Central Mission (now Uniting Care Wesley Adelaide) I prepared a publication Social Enterprise in Australia – An introductory handbook. The publication was designed to be a toolkit providing definitions case studies and a practical guide to business planning and was launched by Monsignor Cappa Chair of the SA Government Social Inclusion Board and laterVice-Chair of the Australian Social Inclusion Board appointed by Julia Gillard. This booklet has achieved over 10,000 download & is recognised as one of the definitive texts This document defined “Social enterprise as a means by which people come together and use market–based ventures to achieve agreed social ends.” It further indicates: “Social Enterprise is characterised by creativity, entrepreneurship, and a focus on community rather than individual profit. It is a creative endeavour that results in social, financial, service, educational, employment, or other community benefits.”Herein lies the first challenge – Social Enterprise is market based and required business acumen!
  • I am currently engaged with Regional Development – why is this relevant to Cooperatives, Mutuals, Social EnterprisesAt least 45 of the top 100 are regionally based (many more had their origins in regional and Rural AustraliaSimilarly nearly 50% of the sector delegates here today are representing rural organisationsI note nearly 50% here today are regional Note – 30% Aust Population regionalRegional Development Australia is a partnership between the Australian, State (NSW) and Local Governments to develop and  strengthen the regional communities of Australia.The RDA’s – 55 across Australia. 14 in NSW. Superseding the former Commonwealth Area Consultative Committees & State Regional Development Boards. There is the RDA - RDA CharterRegional Development Australia, in consultation with the community, business, non-profit organisations and all levels of government, will articulate local priorities, identify and align resources, engage stakeholders and promote solutions.  In doing this, Regional Development Australia will support the growth and development of regional communities across the country. A key focus will be the economic, social  and environmental issues affecting communities. (The Triple bottom Line)
  • The first challenge for RDA – as small NFP organisation with no discretionary grant funding - to have a pivotal role in ensuring the sustainability of our region by working with all sectors.Government (Three tiers) State & National Government as contributing partners Local Government as the community deliveryIndustryCommunityRDA Strategic Environment is represented at its core by sustainability.  The concentric circles surrounding this are, firstly, the purpose; then, a vision; these are, finally, connected to the key influences of Government, Business and Community.Minister Simon Crean has outlined the importance of RDA’s as contributors to regional business growth plans and strategies which will help support economic development, the creation of  new jobs, skill development and business investment.
  • At the 2010 Strategic Regional Leadership Conference in Port Macquarie Minister Crean discussed the concept of “Regionalism” as recognising the great diversity of the challenges that regions face. He stated “The Government’s regional agenda is not drawing lines on a map but responding most effectively to the needs of local communities and recognising how regions can achieve sustainable development. This takes account of the importance of connectedness - between regions and from regions to their capital cities and other major centres”.Regional success is good for both the region and the nation: “a country that is a continent cannot rely on a population limited to a few cities”. Independent Federal member Tony Windsor presciently “Setting the Agenda for Regional Futures Summit” at the University of New England (Feb 2011)The Challenge is LINKING THEM UP – see pic
  • The challenge for RDA and the Cooperative, Mutual, Social Enterprise Movement is to understand & translate the Government’s National Priorities: the vision is our opportunity Skilling AustraliaEmployment Lifting ProductivityOutputMaximising the opportunity of broadbandTelco - opportunitiesSustaining our environmentEnergy Coops – vision for the futureSocial InclusionConcept Enterprise – focus on enterpriseWater and energy efficiencyClean Energy Future
  • RDA MNC Regional Plan recognises the importance of collaboration and connection The whole is greater than the sum of its partsTHE KEY CONNECTIVITY – through Communication / Research / AlignmentRelevance - RDA and the IYCSection 3 Research & Characteristics – Regional SnapshotPage 68 - Community Wealth & Investment identifiesMutuality and Value Based Economic activity – Credit Unions & CoopsThe MNC region has a number of high value wellestablished cooperatives that rank in the top 100 cooperatives in AustraliaTheseinclude Coffs Harbour Fishermen’s Co-operative,Norco Coop, Macleay Valley Coop, Hastings Co-operative and the Nambucca River Co-operative Society. Plus Holiday Coast & Banana Coast Credit UnionThe combined turnover of just these four cooperatives & CU for the year 2010 was nearly $500mEmployment - 1200Credit Unions and Building Societies in the 6 LGA/MNC region hold assets of $1.6 Billion.The community has strong confidence in this financial sector with assets representing slightly over 10% of the state’s totalassets for this sector.This is significant as the MNC portion of the State population is only 3.4%Implications for the region – thinking about the Triple bottom lineThe MNC has a long history of cooperatives which has proven an effective system for market competitiveness particularly in managing markets in the agricultural industry. The Cooperative/Mutualmodel provides a community-based approach for resolving issues such as harnessing the productive capacity of the many comparatively small land holdings..Cooperative ventures are emerging in new market areas including the renewable energy industry and may be a way of mitigating the enormous set-up costs of these ventures.
  • The IYC will benefit regional and urban AustraliaThe 1st Key Challenge – without Enterprise there is not Social EnterpriseThe concept of market based means – selling products and services. The main aim of social enterprises is to generate profit to further their social and or environmental goals. The movement has a responsibility to provide Government with a meaningful model for collaborative business that may be used to support “Social” aims.The movement has a responsibility to demonstrate that an emphasis of Social Enterprise needs an understanding of “Enterprise”. Products and services that are tradable need a market (ie somebody needs/buys them).Herein lies the second challenge – Cooperative movement need to align with Social Enterprise & brand itself Marketing is the key …Theprojects of the IYC – create a fresh brand awareness. The third Challenge for Cooperative/Mutual/Social Enterprise – recognise that the asset base is the Common Bond.Social capital is generated through collaborationRemember history – Australia is a Federation of States – A “Commonwealth”Cooperatives/Mutuals/Social Enterprise share a common bondThe Challenge is yours – the work is now
  • The one story a day campaign
  • Collective voice – influence on policy development, governance and regulation whilst acting as a counterbalance in the wider economic debate. Why? Because we’re responsible businesses, governed by good ethics and strong values. Customers and staff always come first – no exceptions.Agenda – through unity, we gain relevance. With the right vehicle, we can potentially achieve as much influence as key bodies such as the Business Council of Australia and the Australian Industry GroupCo-ops cooperating – promoting the benefits your structure offers to your customers, be they businesses or individuals, or even entire communities. But also recognising that with these benefits come limitations. This is a unique opportunity to achieve scale, improve efficiency and profitability through mutual co-operation – sharing of ideas, alliances, partnerships and innovatingValue proposition – ensuring it is widely understood. Why are you a co-operative or a company that operates under co-operative values? How do you create a chain of ‘believers’ from the top down? Make it simple and easy to understand, then go to Government. This is the ‘collective brand’Individual profile – leveraging the IYC 2012 activities to showcase your value and using this as a platform for driving recognition of your business in the future. This is your ‘individual brand’.Your form – it’s simple, achieve the above, people will listen and they will rally around your values, thereby encouraging government, your customers and the wider community to encourage more
  • Other sectors and bodies – separate drive towards credit unions. Supporting role. Dual financial and in kind contributions from associations such as Abacus, mutual insurers. Dollars, office space, administration support and expertise.Events – potential revenue upside from conferences and collateral such as co-ops publicationOngoing government support – ensuring we have a mandate or at least backing from gov on any legacy outcomes is worth so much more than any funding they could give to a campaign
  • TV ad – two years. All about telling people that we exist and what they can get out of our existence....an alternative to the perceived norm. Very similar to industry funds. Greater focus on price over community. Will evolve once we’re heard.Levy - $10 million budget, near 90% participation, tried and failed and tried and failed. Contrast to collective bank budget spend. Point is still that this is a rally point. Wins – Swan announces better deal in banking package, Choice ‘big switch campaign’ (caveat), asset growth of 15%, awareness increase of 8% in just 18 months
  • Partnerships – we will create a register of activities. You will know what is happening, where and with whom. This is where you can identify potential areas of co-operation, particularly at a regional levelGovernance – steering committee with state and regional links. PAGReporting – Board, CEO and staffLeverage – a suite of statistics, generic collateral and ideas to support your individual activities
  • Summit slide show

    1. 1. IYC 2012<br />Welcome to<br />the <br />Chair and CEO Summit<br />Breakfast<br />Canberra<br />17th August 2011<br />
    2. 2. IYC 2012 Summit<br />“Please accept my apologies for being unable to attend today's meeting, <br />As Chairman of Hepburn Wind, Australia's first co-operatively owned wind farm, I know first hand that communities are eager to work together to solve today's most challenging problems. Co-operative values are as important now as they have ever been. Social enterprises built on these principles have played a major role in building our country and are especially well placed to build a future that we will be proud to hand to future generations.<br />Hepburn Wind is proud to be co-operatively owned and we look forward to working with other co-operatives to help deliver sustainable solutions to communities around Australia.<br />I wish you a productive day and I look forward to hearing the outcomes.”<br /> Regards, Simon Holmes à Court<br />
    3. 3. IYC 2012<br />Welcome to<br />the <br />Chair and CEO Summit<br />Canberra<br />17th August 2011<br />
    4. 4. IYC 2012 CEO Summit<br />Session one<br />IYC 2012 and the legacies we seek – sector challenges<br />
    5. 5. IYC 2012<br />Trent Bartlett<br />Chair<br />IYC Steering Committee &<br />Social Business Australia<br />
    6. 6. IYC 2012<br />
    7. 7. IYC 2012<br />The Challenges we have<br />&<br />The Legacies we seek<br />
    8. 8. Who is sitting next to me?<br />
    9. 9. Why have we come together?<br />
    10. 10. Why have we come together?<br />…… but is it?<br />
    11. 11. It is not about a legal form<br />Co-operation<br />
    12. 12. All Co-op Creatures – Great & Small<br />
    13. 13. Because we are the 4th Sector<br />
    14. 14. Understanding the 4th Sector<br />ORGANISATIONS BY PURPOSE<br />Maximise social benefit<br />Maximise financial <br />benefit to owners<br />EMERGING FOURTH SECTOR<br />For Profits<br />PRIVATE SECTOR<br />For Profits<br />Civic/Municipal Enterprises<br />Common Good Corporations<br />Co-operatives<br />Mutuals<br />Credit Unions<br />Community Investment/Development Corporations<br />Employee Owned Organisations<br />Cross Sectoral Partnerships<br />Ethical Social Institutions<br />Faith Based Enterprises<br />Social Businesses<br />Social Economy Enterprises<br />Social Enterprises<br />Sustainable Enterprises<br />Cause Related Marketing/Purchasing, <br />Ethics.<br />Transparency, <br />Corporate Social Responsibility,<br />Corporate Philanthropy, <br />Environmental Sustainability, <br />Community Relations,<br />Socially Responsible Investing, <br />Stakeholder Accountability, Social Auditing<br />ORGANISATIONS BY INCOME<br />Accountability, Transparency, Effectiveness, <br />Efficiency, Market Discipline, Measurable Impact<br />Venture Philanthropy, Social Investing, Privatisation<br />Economic Sustainability, Program Related Investing<br />SOCIAL SECTOR<br />Non Profits/NGO’s<br />PUBLIC SECTOR<br />Government<br />
    15. 15. Contribution to Community<br />“Increasingly, companies and leaders will be assessed not only on immediate results but also on longer term impact – the ultimate effects their actions have on societal well-being”<br />Dr. Rosabeth Moss Kanter<br />Arbuckle Professor<br />Harvard Business School<br />October 2010<br />
    16. 16. Is this the Future?<br />With the rise and rise of Corporate Social Responsibility, Corporate Philanthropy, Triple Bottom Line, Ethics, Diversity, Social Entrepreneurs – will people ask you….<br />“How does your organisation justifyits existence in our Community/Society?”<br />
    17. 17. Is your Co-op or Mutual relevant?<br />CSL Shareholder Value<br />Expectations<br />Core Member Benefits<br />ShareholderReturns<br />Revenue<br />Growth<br />Operating<br />Margin<br />Asset<br />Efficiency<br />Member<br />Expectations<br />Price<br />Differential<br />Service<br />Differential<br />Value<br />Of <br />Existence<br />Risk <br />Reduction<br />Value<br />Creators<br />Parts <br />Availability<br />Settlement<br />Discount<br />Insurance<br />Business<br />Management<br />Value<br />Drivers<br />Supplier<br />Availability<br />Other<br />Income<br />Fixed <br />Assets<br />External<br />Factors<br />Member<br />Purchasing<br />Volumes<br />Costs of<br />Doing <br />Business<br />Financial<br />Capital<br />
    18. 18. Is your Co-op or Mutual relevant?<br />CSL Shareholder Value<br />Expectations<br />Core Member Benefits<br />ShareholderReturns<br />Revenue<br />Growth<br />Operating<br />Margin<br />Asset<br />Efficiency<br />Member<br />Expectations<br />Price<br />Differential<br />Service<br />Differential<br />Value<br />Of <br />Existence<br />Risk <br />Reduction<br />Value<br />Creators<br />Parts <br />Availability<br />Settlement<br />Discount<br />Insurance<br />Business<br />Management<br />Value<br />Drivers<br />Supplier<br />Availability<br />Other<br />Income<br />Fixed <br />Assets<br />External<br />Factors<br />Member<br />Purchasing<br />Volumes<br />Costs of<br />Doing <br />Business<br />Financial<br />Capital<br />
    19. 19. Is your Co-op or Mutual relevant?<br />How do you nourish your co-operative or mutual identity?<br />As individual co-operatives or mutuals– we need to ask ourselves;<br /><ul><li>Do we care whether we are a co-operative and that others know it?
    20. 20. Are we bothered if our members don’t get it?
    21. 21. What effort do we make to try and help them understand?
    22. 22. Do our members know, appreciate or even care about the co-op difference?</li></ul>Arguably, developing our co-operative identity must be a key element of building a member owned business. <br />
    23. 23. The IYC Global Aims<br /><ul><li>Increase public awareness about co-operatives, how they benefit their members and contribute to socio-economic development
    24. 24. Promote awareness of the global network of co-operatives and their efforts in community building, democracy and peace;</li></ul>INCREASE AWARENESS<br /><ul><li>Promote the formation and growth of co-operatives among individuals and institutions to address common economic needs and for socio-economic empowerment;</li></ul>PROMOTE GROWTH<br /><ul><li>Encourage Governments and regulatory bodies to establish policies, laws and regulation conducive to co-operative formation and growth.</li></ul>ESTABLISH POLICIES<br />
    25. 25. UN and ICA Invitation <br />The International Year of Co-operatives is a unique opportunity to celebrate co-operatives. <br />IYC also provides opportunities to develop new relationships and partnerships with institutions, development partners, citizen groups, and other business enterprises. It can be the year where co-operative foundations or support programmes and funds are launched. <br />B 2 B<br />
    26. 26. Keep it in the Family<br />The International Year of Co-operatives is a unique opportunity to celebrate co-operatives. <br />IYC also provide s opportunities to develop new relationships and partnerships with institutions, development partners, citizen groups, and other business enterprises. It can be the year where co-operative foundations or support programmes and funds are launched. <br />C 2 C<br />
    27. 27. Major Players <br />Academia <br />Plays a pivotal role in strengthening co-operatives and mutualsand provides hard data for governments and the sectors;<br />Private Sector: <br />Co-operatives andmutualswork alongside, and are considered by some to be part of, the private sector. <br />Government <br />Provides the political and regulatory eco-systems for co-operatives & mutualsto thrive and grow (or not). <br />
    28. 28. Co-ops as a Brand<br />Co-op<br />
    29. 29. Brand - What the USA is doing<br />This year the National Co-op Month <br />Planning Committee and the <br />International Credit Union Day <br />Committee teamed <br />up to create one logo and theme to use <br />across Canada and the U.S. <br />for all co-op businesses. <br />Increasing the audience for one brand <br />created more energy around their<br />Co-op Month efforts.  <br />They noticed a dramatic increase in <br />media attention, as well as in social <br />media.<br />
    30. 30. What the Poms are doing<br />
    31. 31. Oz Social Enterprise is 10 years behind<br />SIMPLE<br />Simple Impact Measure for Local Economies<br />
    32. 32. Understanding the 4th Sector<br />ORGANISATIONS BY PURPOSE<br />Maximise social benefit<br />Maximise financial <br />benefit to owners<br />EMERGING FOURTH SECTOR<br />For Profits<br />PRIVATE SECTOR<br />For Profits<br />Civic/Municipal Enterprises<br />Common Good Corporations<br />Co-operatives<br />Mutuals<br />Credit Unions<br />Community Investment/Development Corporations<br />Employee Owned Organisations<br />Cross Sectoral Partnerships<br />Ethical Social Institutions<br />Faith Based Enterprises<br />Social Businesses<br />Social Economy Enterprises<br />Social Enterprises<br />Sustainable Enterprises<br />Cause Related Marketing/Purchasing, <br />Ethics.<br />Transparency, <br />Corporate Social Responsibility,<br />Corporate Philanthropy, <br />Environmental Sustainability, <br />Community Relations,<br />Socially Responsible Investing, <br />Stakeholder Accountability, Social Auditing<br />ORGANISATIONS BY INCOME<br />Accountability, Transparency, Effectiveness, <br />Efficiency, Market Discipline, Measurable Impact<br />Venture Philanthropy, Social Investing, Privatisation<br />Economic Sustainability, Program Related Investing<br />SOCIAL SECTOR<br />Non Profits/NGO’s<br />PUBLIC SECTOR<br />Government<br />
    33. 33. The Business End of Social Enterprise <br />
    34. 34. Our reason for being<br />SOCIAL BUSINESS<br />Profits with Purpose<br />A Good Way of Doing Business<br />&<br />A Business Like Way of Doing Good<br />
    35. 35. The Big Idea – Creating Shared Value <br />“The principle of shared value involving the creation of economic value for society by addressing its needs and challenges.”<br />“Businesses must reconnect company success with social progress”<br />Dr. Michael Porter & Mark Kramer<br />Professor<br />Harvard Business School<br />January 2011<br />
    36. 36. Core versus Periphery <br />CSRCSV<br /><ul><li>Valuing doing good
    37. 37. Citizenship, philanthropy, sustainability
    38. 38. Discretionary or in response to external pressure
    39. 39. Separate from profit maximisation
    40. 40. Agenda is determined by external reporting and personal preferences
    41. 41. Impact limited by corporate foot print and CSR budget</li></ul>Example: Fair trade purchasing<br /><ul><li>Value: economic and societal benefits relative to cost
    42. 42. Joint company and community value creation
    43. 43. Integral to competing
    44. 44. Integral to profit maximisation
    45. 45. Agenda is company specific and internally generated
    46. 46. Re-aligns the entire company budget</li></ul>Example: transforming procurement to increase quality and yield<br />
    47. 47. Social Business Australia – A legacy?<br />SOCIAL BUSINESS AUSTRALIA<br /> Vision To evolve Social Business Australia into a Social Business Council for Australia<br /> Purpose To help social purpose organisations using commercial business models (the 4th Sector) to coalesce<br />
    48. 48. Business Council<br />“Elections provide the opportunity for political leaders to outline their visions for Australia’s future. With the right leadership and policies, Australia has the opportunity now to set its sights higher.<br />This publication, Economic Success, Community Prosperity: Policy Benchmarks for the 2010 Federal Election, provides clear and public understanding of our expectations in advance of the federal election”<br />
    49. 49. Can we claim our rightful place in Society<br />STARTING A BUSINESS<br />VS<br />STARTING A MOVEMENT<br />
    50. 50. Co-operatives provide <br />over 100 million jobs <br />around the world<br />20% more than multi-nationals<br />
    51. 51. The Global Co-operative Movement <br />brings together<br />over 1 billion people as members<br />around the world<br />
    52. 52. The UN estimates<br />that the livelihood <br />of nearly 3 billion people <br />is made secure by <br />co-operative enterprise<br />
    53. 53. Australia’s 2,000 co-operatives & 113 mutual banking institutions are owned by more than 8 million Australians<br />
    54. 54. Between<br />Co-operatives and Credit Unions in Australia<br />there are over 2 million more member/shareholders than the Australian stock market private retail investors.<br />
    55. 55. In 2010 the Top 100 <br />Co-operatives, Mutual’s & <br />Credit Unions <br />in Australia<br />turned over <br />$AUD20b with their members<br />(who are also their owners!)<br />
    56. 56. Australia’s mutual banking sector, made up of <br />104 credit unions &<br /> 9 mutual building societies, <br />is the third largest in the world after the US and Canada. <br />
    57. 57. Supporting Emerging 4th Sector for Social Businesses<br />
    58. 58. IYC 2012 CEO Summit<br />Session two<br />Meeting the challenges<br />
    59. 59. Co-operatives, Mutuals, Social Enterprises <br />International Year of Cooperative <br /> “Meeting the challenges”<br />Presenter<br />Peter Tregilgas Executive Officer <br />Regional Development Australia<br />Mid North Coast (RDA MNC)<br />Wed 17 Aug 2011<br />
    60. 60.
    61. 61.
    62. 62. RDA MNC <br />STRATEGIC<br /> CHALLENGE<br />
    63. 63. Regional Leadership <br />Concept of “Regionalism”<br />
    64. 64. National Priorities <br /><ul><li>Skilling Australia
    65. 65. Lifting Productivity
    66. 66. Maximising the opportunity of broadband
    67. 67. Sustaining our environment
    68. 68. Social Inclusion
    69. 69. Water and energy efficiency</li></li></ul><li>RDA MNC Regional Plan recognises the importance of collaboration and connection <br />
    70. 70. Meeting the 2012 IYC Challenge:<br /><ul><li>Co-operative/Mutual/Social Enterprise are market based
    71. 71. Co-operative/Mutual/Social Enterprise brand need re-development
    72. 72. Co-operative/Mutual/Social Enterprise strength is the “common-bond” - social capital and collaboration</li></li></ul><li>IYC 2012 CEO Summit<br />Session three<br />IYC 2012 national activities<br />
    73. 73. IYC 2012<br />“Making the local – global”<br />The program of national activities developed by the IYC Steering Committee<br />
    74. 74. IYC 2012<br />Bullet points in Calibri 24<br />
    75. 75. IYC 2012<br />23 years<br />Global leadership<br />
    76. 76. IYC 2012<br />A Brand<br />A Message<br />
    77. 77. IYC 2012<br />
    78. 78. IYC 2012<br />United Nations Official Launch, New York City <br />31Oct 2011<br />ICA Launch at the General Assembly, Cancun Mexico<br />14 Nov 2011<br />
    79. 79. IYC 2012<br />Conferences and Global Expo<br />
    80. 80. IYC 2012<br />Conferences and Global Expo<br />
    81. 81. IYC 2012<br />Competitions and Case Studies<br />One Story a Day in 2012<br />
    82. 82. IYC 2012<br />www.2012.coop<br />
    83. 83. IYC 2012<br />Rewards and Recognition<br />
    84. 84. IYC 2012<br />Ambassadors<br />
    85. 85. IYC 2012<br />Maggie Beer, Senior Australian of the Year 2012 and Supporter of IYC 2012<br />
    86. 86. IYC 2012<br />National Co-operative Business Excellence Awards<br />Nominate your Co-operative Champions<br />
    87. 87. IYC 2012<br />IYC Co-operative Year book<br />
    88. 88. IYC 2012<br />Collectibles<br />
    89. 89. IYC 2012<br />www.australia2012.coop<br />Calendar & Newsletter<br />
    90. 90. IYC 2012<br />Social Media<br />
    91. 91. IYC 2012<br />Conferences and Trade Expo<br />
    92. 92. IYC 2012<br />Youth Events<br />
    93. 93. IYC 2012<br />Media and Press Releases<br />
    94. 94. IYC 2012<br />Case Studies<br />
    95. 95. IYC 2012<br />Research and Mapping<br />
    96. 96. IYC 2012<br />
    97. 97. IYC 2012<br />
    98. 98. IYC 2012<br />Our<br />Co-ops<br />?<br />
    99. 99. IYC 2012 CEO Summit<br />Session four (breakout session)<br />IYC 2012 sector initiatives<br />
    100. 100. IYC 2012 CEO Summit<br />Lunch break<br />
    101. 101. IYC 2012 CEO Summit<br />Session five (breakout session cont)<br />Group reports<br />
    102. 102. IYC 2012 CEO Summit<br />Group reports<br />
    103. 103. IYC 2012 CEO Summit<br />Session five (breakout session cont)<br />Group reports<br />
    104. 104. IYC 2012 CEO Summit<br />Group report A – Warren McLean<br /><ul><li>Promotion of the co-op ethos – go and recruit
    105. 105. Partner/network with other successful co-ops
    106. 106. A major event
    107. 107. Re-educate existing members and reinforce loyalty, increase our relevance
    108. 108. Engage the young and those who influence, educate - value
    109. 109. Boost in-government expertise on sector (particularly at regulatory and administration level)
    110. 110. Engage local media on all levels
    111. 111. GenNext</li></li></ul><li>IYC 2012 CEO Summit<br />Group report B –Alex Cramb<br /><ul><li>Continue to build awareness use practical methods
    112. 112. Leverage existing events on the calendar
    113. 113. Reinvent the co-op image
    114. 114. Create events that are relevant to members alone, the community at large
    115. 115. C2C sharing of information and expertise
    116. 116. Define and promote the public dividend co-ops offer
    117. 117. Engagement – government, wider political affiliations (bipartisan)
    118. 118. National (Federal) legislation
    119. 119. Strong national body</li></li></ul><li>IYC 2012 CEO Summit<br />Group report C – Tony O’Shea<br /><ul><li>Must have a national peak body for co-ops, credit unions and mutuals
    120. 120. Advocate government
    121. 121. Raise awareness of the sector and its values
    122. 122. Professional development from top down</li></li></ul><li>IYC 2012 CEO Summit<br />Group report D –Roger Nicholl<br /><ul><li>Raising profile and highlighting benefits
    123. 123. Leverage free/low cost media and national campaign/DLs/point of sale advertising
    124. 124. Use the coin
    125. 125. Talk to members about theirs, and other co-ops – tell the stories
    126. 126. Develop a case study ‘pro forma’
    127. 127. Local and regional champions and facilitators for C2C – mobilise the sector
    128. 128. Open day – tied to key dates, national – have a birthday party
    129. 129. National – gov/community recognition, capital, brand, simple message, targeted research (utilising academics), curriculum
    130. 130. Educating other sectors
    131. 131. Fund new positions (notables, professors, decision makers)</li></li></ul><li>IYC 2012 CEO Summit<br />Group report E – Russell Becker<br /><ul><li>Communication with business leaders, politicians and wider community
    132. 132. Co-ordinated research and education approach
    133. 133. Alignment of key benefits flowing to co-ops and mutuals
    134. 134. Single representative body – need this now, not as a legacy outcome. This will help drive the IYC campaign more effectively</li></li></ul><li>Co-operating to fund it all<br />Suzanne Henderson<br />Director, Social Business Australia<br />Daniel Newlan<br />Senior Adviser, Abacus – Australian Mutuals<br />
    135. 135. Co-operating to fund it all<br />Objective of Session:<br />This session will identify what’s needed to ensure that IYC 2012 and its legacy outcomes are achieved successfully.<br />
    136. 136. Co-operating to fund it all<br />Session recap: IYC 2012 and beyond - what you want<br /><ul><li>A strong national body – potentially now
    137. 137. A brand that reflects a simple message and value proposition
    138. 138. Federal legislation
    139. 139. Partnerships – C2C
    140. 140. The model into the mainstream – promotion, educating accounting circles
    141. 141. Research, information, education – everyone who needs to know
    142. 142. Events and engagement – media, community, members
    143. 143. Innovation, entrepreneurship
    144. 144. Next generation – engaging young people</li></li></ul><li>Co-operating to fund it all<br />Session recap: IYC 2012 and beyond - what you want<br />Getting a body off the ground now<br /><ul><li>Advocacy will be difficult. Needs to be sold?(check) – A
    145. 145. Funded, inclusive and ensure it’s a broad church. Quality people. Fair and representative. Good governance. Don’t reinvent the wheel. B
    146. 146. Change SBA into a co-op. Have to properly define what a social business is. Refer CU “Project renewal”. The A. Theme B is broader church – Group C
    147. 147. Full representation. United front. Clear, broad goals and targets. 9-person committee (right balance). Independent chair. Group D
    148. 148. Services/what does it do, how is it funded. Practical solution – service deliver (service for fee). Member base. Link to gov social inclusion agenda. Matching contribution from gov (as key partner). Other partners, such as ACOSS. Single name that reflects the broader church. Something that galvanises. E</li></li></ul><li>Co-operating to fund it all<br />Session recap: IYC 2012 and beyond - what you want<br />Next steps<br /><ul><li>xx</li></li></ul><li>IYC 2012<br />Outcomes – what’s possible<br /><ul><li>A collective voice
    149. 149. A regular slot on the political, economic and social agenda
    150. 150. Co-operatives co-operating
    151. 151. A unique value proposition
    152. 152. Boosting your individual profile
    153. 153. Preservation and promotion of your business form</li></li></ul><li>IYC 2012<br />“…the human animal has achieved the great things it has, not only as a result of competition between us but also as a result of our heightened ability to co-operate in the achievement of common objectives. <br />The economists' conventional model is big on competition, but sets little store by co-operation, since it assumes we're all rugged individualists. <br /> Ross Gittens, Maybe economic reform is worsening productivity <br /> Sydney Morning Herald, August 15, 2011<br />
    154. 154. Co-operating to fund it all<br />Making it happen<br />State of play<br />Funding the IYC 2012 activities<br />Supporting the IYC 2012 activities<br />Supporting the IYC 2012 legacy outcomes<br />Next steps<br />
    155. 155. Co-operating to fund it all<br />State of play<br /><ul><li> IYC 2012 Secretariat Ltd
    156. 156. Seed funding – Capricorn Society, $100,000
    157. 157. Additional funding support – Abacus, Macleay
    158. 158. Ongoing funding – Capricorn Society, $160,000
    159. 159. National appeal launched </li></li></ul><li>Co-operating to fund it all<br />Making it happen<br />Funding the IYC 2012 activities<br /><ul><li> Please refer to page 16 of your supporters pack</li></li></ul><li>Co-operating to fund it all<br />Making it happen<br />Funding the IYC 2012 activities<br /><ul><li>Please refer to Appendix A of your supporters pack</li></li></ul><li>Co-operating to fund it all<br />Making it happen<br />Other support – financial and in-kind<br /><ul><li> Other sectors and bodies
    160. 160. Events and collateral
    161. 161. Government support</li></li></ul><li>Co-operating to fund it all<br />Making it happen – funding case study<br />Abacus Industry Promotion Campaign<br /><ul><li> National TV advertising campaign and spot PR
    162. 162. Funded via industry levy
    163. 163. Key wins – government recognition and increased awareness</li></ul>A war chest<br />
    164. 164. Co-operating to fund it all<br />Making it happen<br />Supporting the IYC 2012 activities<br /><ul><li>Solid partnerships – national, regional, local and b2b
    165. 165. Good governance
    166. 166. Regular and meaningful reporting
    167. 167. Wide leverage – supporting your brand, collateral</li></li></ul><li>Co-operating to fund it all<br />Making it happen<br />Supporting the IYC 2012 legacy outcomes<br /><ul><li>Obtain the funding
    168. 168. Go back and sell it
    169. 169. Mobilise the right people
    170. 170. Rally decision makers now and sow the seeds of support
    171. 171. Listen to your members
    172. 172. Get the data</li></li></ul><li>Co-operating to fund it all<br />Session recap: IYC 2012 and beyond - what you want<br /><ul><li>Advocacy will be difficult. Needs to be sold?(check) – A
    173. 173. Funded, inclusive and ensure it’s a broad church. Quality people. Fair and representative. Good governance. Don’t reinvent the wheel. B
    174. 174. Change SBA into a co-op. Have to properly define what a social business is. Refer CU “Project renewal”. The A. Theme B is broader church – Group C
    175. 175. Full representation. United front. Clear, broad goals and targets. 9-person committee (right balance). Independent chair. Group D
    176. 176. Services/what does it do, how is it funded. Practical solution – service deliver (service for fee). Member base. Link to gov social inclusion agenda. Matching contribution from gov (as key partner). Other partners, such as ACOSS. Single name that reflects the broader church. Something that galvanises. E</li></li></ul><li>Co-operating to fund it all<br />Making it happen<br />This is a one off opportunity to rally around a common cause<br />It will need action at a national, regional and local level<br />It will need sustainable outcomes<br />It will take significant resources, talent and passion<br />
    177. 177. Co-operating to fund it all<br />The process?<br /><ul><li>September – broad campaign plan, letter and invoice
    178. 178. October – funding receipts and strategy finalisation
    179. 179. November – detailed campaign plan and supporting strategy
    180. 180. December – collateral and launch of IYC 2012, detailed governance structure</li></li></ul><li>IYC 2012 CEO Summit<br />Session seven<br />A vision beyond 2012 – close and wrap up<br />
    181. 181. IYC 2012 CEO Summit<br />Thank you!<br />Key contacts:<br /><ul><li>SBA - Trent Bartlett trent.bartlett@socialbusiness.coop
    182. 182. Abacus - Daniel Newlan dnewlan@abacus.org.au
    183. 183. Facilitation - John Lonergan, john.lonergan@onthe.net.au</li>

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