Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
International health care 2-13-11
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

International health care 2-13-11

317

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
317
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • (This is a superscript)
  • The difference between a Canadian Province and a territory is a province receives its power and authority directly from the Crown initiated from the Constitution Act, 1867 wherefore territories derive their mandates from the federal government.
  • (This is a superscript)
  • Transcript

    • 1. Canada’s Health Care System Is It Really The Best ?
    • 2. Content References <ul><li>Knickman, R., James, Kovner,R.,Anthony, Stevens, Jonas., Health Care </li></ul><ul><li>Delivery In The United States, 9 th Edition </li></ul><ul><li>Kraker, D., The Canadian Cure. Online </li></ul><ul><li>( http:// wwwinmotionmagazine.com/hcare/canadahc.html ) </li></ul><ul><li>Pollard, S., Canadian Health Care, report commissioned by Civitas 2002 </li></ul><ul><li>Rachlis, M, Opinion: Canadian Doctor Shares True Pros & Cons of Canadian Health Care Online: </li></ul><ul><li>( http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/280367 ) </li></ul><ul><li>Pola Vargas </li></ul>
    • 3. Image References <ul><li>Statistics Canada Population Estimates (April 1, 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>( http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/080625/d080625b.htm ) </li></ul><ul><li>Mae, M., Pros and Cons of Canadian Healthcare </li></ul><ul><li>( http:// hubpages.com/hub/ProsandCons -of-Canadian-Healthcare ) </li></ul>
    • 4. Provinces and Territories
    • 5. Development of Medicare <ul><li>Canada’s health care system is known as Medicare. Canada has always taken pride in providing quality health care even though their system is publicly funded and privately managed. According to Kraker (2002) the system is based on five founding principles: Care must be universal, portable, comprehensive, accessible and publicly administered. </li></ul><ul><li>In addition, Canada’s provinces are charged with the planning, financing, evaluating the condition of hospital care and negotiating salaries and fees of health professionals and physicians. Kraker also indicates that each provincial insurance plan differs slightly regarding how far each province extends public insurance coverage beyond medically necessary hospital and physician services. </li></ul>
    • 6. Provinces and Territories Population <ul><li>Provinces </li></ul><ul><li>Ontario-12,891,787 </li></ul><ul><li>Quebec-7,744530 </li></ul><ul><li>Nova Scotia-935,962 </li></ul><ul><li>New Brunswick-751,527 </li></ul><ul><li>Mantoba-1,196,291 </li></ul><ul><li>British Columbia-4,428356 </li></ul><ul><li>Prince Edward Island-139,407 </li></ul><ul><li>Saskatchewan-1,010,146 </li></ul><ul><li>Alberta-3,512, 368 </li></ul><ul><li>Newfoundland and Labrador-508,270 </li></ul><ul><li>Territories </li></ul><ul><li>Northwest Territories-42,514 </li></ul><ul><li>Yukon-31,530 </li></ul><ul><li>Nunavut-31,152 </li></ul>
    • 7. Fiscal Federalism <ul><li>Canada’s extended history of universal health care began in 1944 by Saskatchewan one of the first provinces to introduce universal hospital insurance. By 1958 the government had agreed to assist with the plan by offering 50-50 cost sharing with the provinces. The physicians who were not in agreement with the plan staged a strike in 1962. Saskachewan launched a widely universal medical coverage plan, the government once again followed suit in 1965 offering an additional 50-50 cost sharing. But the cost sharing agreement had stipulations by the government, the stipulations were the provinces had to meet four decisive factors: comprehensiveness, portability, public administration and universality. </li></ul>
    • 8. Fiscal Federalism con’t <ul><li>In 1968 this policy was implemented which allowed the government full control over the provinces to withhold funds if the principles were not met. </li></ul><ul><li>By 1971, all Canadians were guaranteed access to essential medical services, regardless of employment, income, or health (Kraker, 2002). </li></ul>
    • 9. Quality Health Services
    • 10. Quality Health Services
    • 11. Progress and Challenges in Health Care <ul><li>From the past to the present health care systems have woven together infrastructure, resources, formal and informal practioners, research and a myriad of policies and practices related directly or indirectly to health. Research indicates weak health systems are undermining the ability of many low-income countries to keep people healthy: children may not receive life-saving immunizations or vitamins, and women may be forced to five birth without help from trained attendants. By working with partners and other donors, Canada is supporting innovative programs such as the Africa Health Systems Initiative to support developing countries efforts to ensure health systems meet the needs of the population. </li></ul>
    • 12.  
    • 13. Progress and Challenges in Health Care con’t <ul><li>Canada has been at the forefront as a top donor in achieving success with the following results: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Measles deaths have declined by large since 2000 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>River blindness nearly eliminated in West Africa </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Research has shown insecticide-treated mosquito nets reduced child deaths by 20 percent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More than 2.1 million deaths worldwide have been averted since 1998 due to a vitamin a program. </li></ul></ul>
    • 14. Canadian Doctor Shares True Pros & Cons of Canadian Health Care <ul><li>Dr. Michael M. Rachlis gives his opinion regarding health care in Canada: “there’s been a vast debate regarding a public option in the U.S. and most of it seems to be based on misinformation and fear tactics. Unfortunately, there’s been a shortage of informed opinions and solid facts. I think it would be a good idea of many people who enjoy the benefit of universal health care in other countries would come forth and share their experiences. </li></ul><ul><li>With the vast number of uninsured Americans, and the fact that insurances companies can and do deny coverage on a very arbitrary basis, there seems to be a need of some kind of major overhaul in the American health care system. </li></ul>
    • 15. Pros and Cons of Canadian Health Care System <ul><li>Pros </li></ul><ul><li>No doctor bills, no hospital bills, no co-pay </li></ul><ul><li>No one is excluded </li></ul><ul><li>Excellent public health, preventative services, free mammograms, dietitians diabetic nurses and nurses for home visits for new mothers the chronically ill and the elderly </li></ul><ul><li>Emergency transport by air or ambulance is provided for a minimal charge in BC of $60 or less </li></ul><ul><li>Low health premiums </li></ul><ul><li>Doctors may opt out of the system </li></ul><ul><li>Doctors may not collect fees from patients and also bill the Province for the same service </li></ul>
    • 16. Pros and Cons of Canadian Health Care System <ul><li>Cons </li></ul><ul><li>Waiting list for elective procedures </li></ul><ul><li>Must be referred by family doctor to see a specialist </li></ul><ul><li>Shortage of doctors caused by brain drain to the U.S. and mistakes made by the College of Physicians and Surgeons who control the number of medical student admissions and residencies available to immigrant doctors </li></ul><ul><li>Travel cost to see a specialist if you live away from the urban area due to concentration of specialists in large centers for efficiency (80% of all Canadians live in urban areas). </li></ul><ul><li>Hospitals are not up to date, no in-room phones and wards are co-ed </li></ul>
    • 17. Mammie Mae-Canadian Resident Opinion <ul><li>Mammie has a son who lives and works in the USA. He works for a large international company. He recently got notice that his health insurance premiums have raised 41% to $900 a month and he can no longer afford the coverage. The policy has also increased the co-pay which he has to pay 20% of all procedures. Her opinion: “there are no perfect health care systems because people are imperfect. The system the US currently has is based on greed and an insurance company standing between the patient and the needed care”. </li></ul>
    • 18. International Comparisons <ul><li>Canada </li></ul><ul><li>-best physicans </li></ul><ul><li>-health care for all residents </li></ul><ul><li>-best hospitals </li></ul><ul><li>-spends less per capita </li></ul>
    • 19. International Comparison cont’ <ul><li>France </li></ul><ul><li>-best physicians </li></ul><ul><li>-best hospitals </li></ul><ul><li>-all residents entitled to </li></ul><ul><li> health care </li></ul><ul><li>Great Britain </li></ul><ul><li>-basic health services </li></ul><ul><li>-all residents entitled to health care </li></ul><ul><li>-best physicians </li></ul><ul><li>-best hospitals </li></ul><ul><li>-spends less per capita per United States </li></ul>
    • 20. International Comparison <ul><li>United States </li></ul><ul><li>-spends more on administrative cost and care </li></ul><ul><li>-high uninsurance rates </li></ul><ul><li>-spends more for health care </li></ul><ul><li>-everyone not insured </li></ul><ul><li>What’s in your pocket? </li></ul>

    ×