• Save
Every Page is Page One with SuiteShare
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Every Page is Page One with SuiteShare

on

  • 454 views

Presenters: Mark Baker, Principal Consultant, Analecta Communications and Joe Gelb, President, Suite Solutions ...

Presenters: Mark Baker, Principal Consultant, Analecta Communications and Joe Gelb, President, Suite Solutions
Abstract:
The Internet has changed how your customers view and use content. If your content is not easy to find and immediately helpful, readers will move on almost at once. Every page must be Page One when it comes to delivering the right content at the right time. For technical communicators, this environment presents a unique challenge: How do you cover a large and complex product using only topics, and how do you enable your readers to find and navigate topic-based content effectively?

Mark Baker, Principal Consultant for Analecta Communications, will introduce his approach to planning, creating, managing, and organizing topic-based documentation that your customer can use: “Every Page is Page One.” Joe Gelb, President of Suite Solutions, will then illustrate how this approach can be implemented using SuiteShare, a social knowledge base for optimized content delivery.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
454
Views on SlideShare
381
Embed Views
73

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

3 Embeds 73

http://suitesol.profiledatacenter.com 29
http://www.suite-sol.com 27
http://suite-sol.com 17

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Every Page is Page One with SuiteShare Every Page is Page One with SuiteShare Presentation Transcript

    • Every Page is Page One with SuiteShare Joe Gelb, Suite Solutions Mark Baker, Analecta Communications Inc. March 18, 2014
    • Introducing Suite Solutions Joe Gelb • Founder and President of Suite Solutions Suite Solutions Our Vision: Enable you to engage your customers by providing quick access to relevant information • Help companies get it right the first time • XML-based Authoring/Publishing Solutions • Enterprise Intelligent Dynamic Content: SuiteShare Social KB • Consulting, System Integration • Cross-Industry Expertise • High Tech, Aerospace & Defense, Discrete Manufacturing • Healthcare, Government • Blue Chip Customer Base
    • Analecta Communications Inc.  Content Creation  Every Page is Page One information design  Content Engineering  Bottom-up information architecture  Content system development and scripting  Content Strategy  Content strategy for tech comm  Bottom-up content creation and governance strategies Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 3
    • The book  Every Page is Page One: Topic-based Writing for Technical Communication and the Web  XML Press  http://xmlpress.net/p ublications/eppo Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 4
    • Readers skip around  “Learners … often skip over crucial material if it does not address their current task-oriented concern or skip around among several manuals, composing their own ersatz instructional procedure on the fly.” John Carroll, The Nurnberg Funnel, 1990 Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 5
    • Goal directed reading  “Many sequencing problems reside not in the material alone but in the learner’s use of it. When people refer to instruction opportunistically in support of their own goal-directed activities, it becomes difficult or impossible to predict what sequencing will be appropriate…” John Carroll, The Nurnberg Funnel, 1990 Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 6
    • Radical Then; Mainstream Now  The concept of creating unsequenced material was “radical” in 1990  Today, it is the default  The Web is not sequenced  Every Page is Page One Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 7
    • Why “Every Page is Page One?”  Readers arrive at content  Via a search  Via a recommendation in a social network  Via a link from another page  There is no continuity from where they were before.  Every link leads to a new page one Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 8
    • Even when not on the Web  People search the Web  When watching TV or movies  When reading books  When reading billboards  When reading menus  There is nothing holding the reader to your content anymore Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 9
    • John Carroll anticipated this  “Escaping these problems and providing for material to be sensibly read in any order, necessitates a different approach to organizing instruction. It requires a high degree of modularity, a structure of small self-contained units.” Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 10
    • But …  Not every page works well as page one Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 11
    • Jump into the middle  The page is in the middle of something  Reader has to back up to find start of the thread  It may be a “topic,” but it assumes sequence Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 12
    • On the Web but Not of the Web  Putting a PDF or a tri-pane help system on your Website does not create Web-like content.  Native Web content does not look like this.  Native Web content is not sequential  Readers don’t stick to one site. They hop around the whole Web Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 13
    • Information Foraging Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 14 Photo: Amanda Lea, Wikimedia Commons
    • Information foraging  “Information foraging predicts that the easier it is to find good patches, the quicker users will leave a patch. Thus, the better search engines get at highlighting quality sites, the less time users will spend on any one site.” Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 15 Jakob Nielsen’s Alertbox: June 30, 2003 Information Foraging: Why Google Makes People Leave Your Site Faster
    • Information snacking  The growth of always-on broadband connections also encourages this trend toward shorter visits. With dial-up, connecting to the Internet is somewhat difficult, and users mainly do it in big time chunks. In contrast, always-on connections encourage information snacking , where users go online briefly, looking for quick answers. Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 16 Jakob Nielsen’s Alertbox: June 30, 2003 Information Foraging: Why Google Makes People Leave Your Site Faster
    • Information scent  The key concept in information foraging is information scent  Does content smell of the information I need?  Content that does not smell right is not read  Readers will quickly depart following a new information scent Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 17
    • Information architecture  Traditional architecture organized top down  Information scent is in the organization, not in the content  Individual pages often have poor information scent Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 18
    • Tree of Knowledge 19
    • Rise of Frankenbooks 20
    • Limits of Top Down Organization  Scope  Scale  Variety  Complexity  Unevenness  “Everything is Miscellaneous” 21
    • Where top-down works  When readers want a curriculum  Intuitive classifications  Natural hierarchies  Canonical hierarchies (for those who know them) 22
    • Where top-down fails  When readers are goal-directed  Unfamiliar classifications  Unnatural hierarchies  Irregular relationships  Just too much stuff
    • Goal-directed readers follow information scent  Readers make their individual goal- driven journey through a Web of information  Our content is one resource they may visit on that journey  They enter our content at the bottom  If they stay in our content, they navigate it bottom-up Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 24
    • The architecture in the content 25
    • Each Page is Hub of Local Subject Space 26
    • Not just about links  Bottom-up architecture is not just about links  The nodes of a network have to work reliably for the network to be reliable  The nodes have to be correctly connected for the network to be reliable  Need to be Every Page is Page One 27
    • Characteristics of EPPO topics  Self-contained  Specific and limited purpose  Establish context  Conform to type  Assume the reader is qualified  Stay on one level  Link richly along lines of subject affinity 28
    • Contextual Relevance What they need, when they need it. Provide quick access to information that enables our readers to achieve their immediate goal Targeting your audience • Who is the reader? Profile, persona • End-users • Partners • Service technicians • Technical support staff • Marketing and sales people • Prospective customers • Security profile • Proficiency level • Geographical location Service Engineers Customers Partners Sales Tech Support
    • Contextual Relevance What they need, when they need it. Goals and Use Case Scenarios • What are they trying to accomplish? • Get trained • Install, Configure, Commission • Use, Administer • Maintain, Adjust, Troubleshoot • Upgrade • Make a purchasing decision • What equipment are they operating? • Version? Configuration? Protocol? Interface? • What device are they viewing the information on? • Will they have network access? • Are there safety considerations?
    • Illustration: Field Service I’m a service engineer I need to: • Install a new 8300S Flow Meter via Profibus protocol • Connect to the Device Manager using a hand-held Field Communicator • The plant has no internet access. Let me: • Pull together updated information • Download to my tablet before I go onsite. While onsite, I figured out how to solve a tricky problem. I took some pictures with my smart phone and a short video to illustrate the problem and solution. When I get online, let me: • Write up a how-to article • Upload the video so my colleagues can learn from my experience.
    • Approaches to categorizing content Metadata • audience • category • keywords • product info • versions • product name, brand, component, feature, platform, series Taxonomy and classification • Build knowledge model of your domain • Apply it to your content
    • Taxonomy and Classification Taxonomy (subject scheme) • Defines sets of controlled values for classifying content (subjects or facets) • Organized in hierarchies • Defines relationships between subjects • Can be modular, so business units can develop, maintain and utilize parts of the taxonomy that are relevant to them • Evolves to adapt to new situations and contexts Classification • Categorizes the content using the subjects defined in the taxonomy • Classification is maintained separately from the content • SMEs and content developers can classify the content • Does not require you to “own” or change the content
    • Automated Classification Ingenia
    • Taxonomy in bottom-up architecture  Taxonomy is not just for top-down classification  Taxonomy terms and classes occur throughout content  Locate topic at the intersection of multiple categories  Bottom-up linking architecture is based on taxonomy terms and categories occurring in the text Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 35
    • Taking the Leap to a New Paradigm Dynamic Enterprise Content • Variety of content: documentation, videos, how-to articles, safety information, data sheets, marketing material • Context filtering: quick, goal-oriented access to contextually relevant content • Personalized docs: allow readers to assemble content on demand and render to PDF for print and ePub for offline mobile access • Audience Participation: allow your audience to add new content, comment on existing content, express approval, and easily share knowledge with others • Modern User Experience: smooth transition between mobile and desktop • Activity often starts on mobile, moves to desktop, returns to mobile • Internet connection not always available
    • Let’s see it in action… Demonstration using SuiteShare Dynamic Publishing
    • Hmmm, this looks interesting… For additional information, contact: Joe Gelb solutions@suite-sol.com U.S. Office EMEA Office (609) 360-0650 +972-2-993-8054 www.suite-sol.com
    • Questions?  Contact information  Mark Baker  Analecta Communications Inc.  mbaker@analecta.com  Twitter: @mbakeranalecta  Company: http://analecta.com  Phone: 1 613 422 9400  Blog: http://everypageispageone.com  Book: http://xmlpress.net/publications/eppo/ Content Creation, Content Engineering, Content Strategy 39