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Di Grennell - Preventing Māori suicide: Involving whānau and community
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Di Grennell - Preventing Māori suicide: Involving whānau and community

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Di Grennell of Whānau Ora discusses suicide prevention for Māori in the second of three online seminars.

Di Grennell of Whānau Ora discusses suicide prevention for Māori in the second of three online seminars.


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  • 1. Keeping whānauin the centreSupporting culturally groundedresponses to suicide preventionFebruary 2013
  • 2. He aha te waiata? Tangohia mai te taura i tāku kakī kia waiata au i tāku waiata ... Take the rope from my throat that I may sing my song ... Mokomoko, Mt Eden Prison, 22 May 1866 Nehe Dewes ‘The Past Before Us’ in Te Ao Mārama: Regaining Aotearoa, Witi Ihimaera ed, 1993 2
  • 3. Keeping whānau in the centre How do we create the sort of structures and experiences that bring whānau together to identify their own strengths, issues, solutions, pathways? How do we develop and realise the protective potential of whānau? 3
  • 4. Keeping whānau in the centre Whānau resilience is about the ability of the whānau to provide a protective environment for members from adverse influences of both personal and collective risk factors. However, the absence of material and social resources counts against caring for others, which in turn undermines the very purpose of whānau (Durie, 2005, p200) ... it is enormously difficult for whānau to protect members from personal and collective risk factors. ‘Whānau Taketake Māori – Recessions & Māori Resilience’, Families Commission, 2010, p 65 4
  • 5. Spectrum of prevention Strengthening knowledge & skills of individual whānau members Promoting education for whānau and hapori Māori Educating providers Fostering networks & collaboration Changing organizational practices Influencing policy & legislation www.preventioninstitute.org 5
  • 6. Models of practice or models for living? Taha tinana – physical & body dimension, exercise, nutrition, prevention & management of limiting conditions Taha wairua – spiritual dimension, spiritual practice linked to place Taha hinengaro – language, education, stress management, disciplined & unclouded mind Taha whānau – connection, genealogy, inclusion, contribution, communication 6
  • 7. Culturally grounded approaches… Key influencers within the whānau will be those in a relationship of trust.Connections that matter taketime and consistent, culturallyappropriate engagement.Suicide prevention measuresshould incorporate bothspiritual and culturalresponses and solutions andcan incorporate traditionalways of assessing andengaging.Identity is derived from astrong cultural base: marae,whakapapa, kaumātua,whanaungatanga.Cultural and clinicalapproaches can becomplementary.Whānau planning – seeding www.whanauoraresearch.co.nzhope and aspiration. 7
  • 8. He aha te waiata? E kore au i ngaro, he kākano i ruia mai i Rangiātea. I will never be lost, for I am a seed sown in Rangiātea. Traditional www.tpk.govt.nz 8