Paul Greenberg2013LEFT BRAIN MEET RIGHT BRAIN: CUSTOMEREXPERIENCE, BUSINESS BENEFITS, AND HOW WEFEEL ABOUT IT ALL
“CRM is a philosophy and a businessstrategy, supported by a system and atechnology, designed to improve humaninteractions ...
“CRM is the only science of business thatattempts to reproduce an art of life.”Source: SkipWalters.net
“If a customer likes you and continues to likeyou they will continue to do business withyou. If they don’t…they won’t”
The Basic PremiseWhat businesses value and whatcustomers value are different
• Meaningful experiences/customer value:– Accomplishment (sense of satisfaction in achievement)– Beauty (pleasure to sense...
FEELINGS ON A SCALE OF…NOT
In love Love Like a lot Eh Don’t like HateFeelings on a Scale of…Not
• Customer intersects but…– That’s only part of the life of acustomer – and…– This has serious implicationsfor customer ex...
Keep in mind, that because people have“personal value chains,” there are thingsyour business cannot control….
But there are things you can…
DESIGNING & MANAGING THE EXPERIENCE
• The objective:– The customers’ experiences should be good enough to ideally create “a company like me.”– This should res...
• Behavioral– “My high-level definition is that influence is the ability to change someone’sthought or actions. You either...
• A combination of some or all:– Products– Services– Tools– Consumable ExperiencesDesigning and Managing
When the ordinary fails, the impact is greater on theexperience then when the extraordinary and luxuriousfails, because th...
MAPPING THE EXPERIENCE
How to start: First steps– Make sure that the perception of and the vision for the customerexperience are consistent acros...
The customer map– The interaction• Granular process• Multi-channel– Expectations against the interaction• As important as ...
“We need to do this because the industry is highly competitive… All of thecompetitors are willing to cut prices and they a...
Mapping the Customer Experience– Survey the customer’s response to each point of interaction – in depthinterviews– Make su...
Never presume for the customer– You don’t know what emotional weight they give the interaction– You don’t know what caused...
Visual (or verbal) cues provide informationbut, you still have to interpret & judge.Mapping the Experience
What does thispicture tell you?I’masleepI’mfrustratedI’m deadMapping the Experience
CASE STUDY: DAVID’S BRIDAL25
Greeting & Registration– Were you greeted when you first camein? If yes, can you describe how you weregreeted?– How would ...
Consultation & Product Selection– What did you think of the consultantyou worked with? How would youdescribe the personali...
Other high level examples of questions for mapping– Can you describe your experience shopping for your bridesmaiddresses?–...
CASE STUDIES: MANAGING THE EXPERIENCE
• Colombian Telco• Targeting residentialservice for CTOs
Justin Timberlake“He seems to not take himselftoo seriously and that moxiecan take you a long way. It’sone thing to passiv...
• He carefully manages the“Timberlake Experience”– While releasing The 20/20 Experience• He did few interviews• Alignment ...
DELIVERING THE EXPERIENCEThe Quality of Engagement
THE PHILADELPHIA FLYERS
Delivering the Experience• The overarching strategy– Engage the fans all ways– Know each fan’s individuallifestyles to cus...
Flyers’ Fan EngagementProgram“The How You Doin’? Program is the culture of thisorganization. We are always making sure tha...
How You Doin’? Program– All staff at both HQ and Wells Fargo Centertrained to:• Greet everyone who comes intostadium• Answ...
How You Doin’ - Facebook How You Doin’ – LinkedinDelivering the Experience
• 87% of all fansgreeted• 97% were highlysatisfiedDoin’ Fine!
Delivering the Experience
Delivering the Experience
• Cool or not, this is still abusiness decision thatneeds to see a return• Went to incentivesbased programDelivering the E...
• The Early Bird Game Plan: Seasons TicketholderRenewals & Acquisitions– Client development department– Account reps assig...
• The Spot Event – 2-3 stars– They book the Hall of Fame Roomat Wells Fargo Center for happyhour– Season’s ticket holders–...
• The Experience– Customers felt that they were getting personalattention in a room that also reminds them of theteam’s ra...
Delivering the Experience
The Results?– From 2010 through 2012, seasons ticket renewalswere up more than 1000 from the previous year.Delivering the ...
• The Steps– Develop an engagement strategy– Define what you’re going to need to do and to have– As you get what you need ...
CHOICE, CIRCUMSTANCE, CONTEXT
• The customer experience isoften decided in the firstfew minutes of theinteraction– That means the choices madeby the com...
• Expectations driven by thegeneral hotel experience– Easy check-in– Recognition of elite status– Courtesy regardless of s...
• The hotel experience – choice– No points at check-in unlike any other hotel– Lack of courtesy – refusal to explain why t...
Circumstantial events wouldn’tmatter as much53Choice, Circumstance, Context
The Hilton lost a contract that wastheirs to keepChoice, Circumstance, Context
ADVOCATES + COMPANY = LOVE*OUTCOMES
• A continuously excellent experience drives advocacy– Meeting expectations for things important to the customer– Exceedin...
The 360° view of the customer is no longer theholy grail. It’s a pre-requisite.The Outcome?
The new holy grail: A company like me.The Outcome
Sugarcon 2013: Left Brain Meet Right Brain: Customer Experience, Business Benefits, and How We Feel About it All
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  • Sugarcon 2013: Left Brain Meet Right Brain: Customer Experience, Business Benefits, and How We Feel About it All

    1. 1. Paul Greenberg2013LEFT BRAIN MEET RIGHT BRAIN: CUSTOMEREXPERIENCE, BUSINESS BENEFITS, AND HOW WEFEEL ABOUT IT ALL
    2. 2. “CRM is a philosophy and a businessstrategy, supported by a system and atechnology, designed to improve humaninteractions in a business environmentSource: Searchcrm.com
    3. 3. “CRM is the only science of business thatattempts to reproduce an art of life.”Source: SkipWalters.net
    4. 4. “If a customer likes you and continues to likeyou they will continue to do business withyou. If they don’t…they won’t”
    5. 5. The Basic PremiseWhat businesses value and whatcustomers value are different
    6. 6. • Meaningful experiences/customer value:– Accomplishment (sense of satisfaction in achievement)– Beauty (pleasure to senses & spirit)• Bang & Olufsen• “Form follows function” (Louis Sullivan)– Creation (producing something new – lasting contribution)– Community (sense of unity with others – common purpose)– Duty (applying self to responsibility)– Enlightenment (understanding through reason or logic)– Freedom (sense of living without unwanted restraints)– Harmony (pleasing relationship of parts to whole)– Justice (feeling of equitable & unbiased treatment)– Oneness (unity with that around you)– Redemption (deliverance from past failure or problem)– Security (freedom from fear of loss/worry)– Truth (commitment to honesty/integrity)– Validation (sense of being valued individual worthy of respect)– Wonder (awe of something beyond understanding)Source: Making of Meaning: How Successful BusinessesDeliver Meaningful Customer Experiences –Diller, Shedroff, Rhea (2006)The Basic Premise
    7. 7. FEELINGS ON A SCALE OF…NOT
    8. 8. In love Love Like a lot Eh Don’t like HateFeelings on a Scale of…Not
    9. 9. • Customer intersects but…– That’s only part of the life of acustomer – and…– This has serious implicationsfor customer experience andits treatmentPVCEVCVendors/SuppliersFriends FamilyEverythingElseGoing OnOtherCompaniesExternalAgenciesPartners/ChannelsEVCCompanyPart of PVC Intersects EVC Customer
    10. 10. Keep in mind, that because people have“personal value chains,” there are thingsyour business cannot control….
    11. 11. But there are things you can…
    12. 12. DESIGNING & MANAGING THE EXPERIENCE
    13. 13. • The objective:– The customers’ experiences should be good enough to ideally create “a company like me.”– This should result in something that provides mutually beneficial value to both customer andcompany• The ideal results come in four parts:– The ordinary is kept ordinary– Customers’ expectations are met and occasionally exceeded.– A flexible approach, processes/best practices, and ongoing cultural/organizational support areinstitutionalized.– The customer feels good about their involvement with you – no matter what form it takes.Designing and Managing
    14. 14. • Behavioral– “My high-level definition is that influence is the ability to change someone’sthought or actions. You either change someone’s sentiment or opinion or feelingsabout something, or you change their actions. A purchase, the referral of afriend, staying loyal – all of these are behavior changes.” – Michael Wu, ChiefScientist, Lithium TechnologiesDesigning and Managing
    15. 15. • A combination of some or all:– Products– Services– Tools– Consumable ExperiencesDesigning and Managing
    16. 16. When the ordinary fails, the impact is greater on theexperience then when the extraordinary and luxuriousfails, because there is no expectation of possible failure of theordinary.Designing and Managing
    17. 17. MAPPING THE EXPERIENCE
    18. 18. How to start: First steps– Make sure that the perception of and the vision for the customerexperience are consistent across the company– Be certain that you have a CRM strategy for the entire value chainbefore you execute on the plan– Remember you will be involving your customers directlyMapping the Experience
    19. 19. The customer map– The interaction• Granular process• Multi-channel– Expectations against the interaction• As important as the interaction itself– Weight of each interaction will vary from customer to customer• Will vary with individual customer potentially day-to-dayMapping the Experience
    20. 20. “We need to do this because the industry is highly competitive… All of thecompetitors are willing to cut prices and they are improving services daily.We need them to be exceptional.” – Sandra De Zoysa, CCO, Dialog AxiataMapping the Experience
    21. 21. Mapping the Customer Experience– Survey the customer’s response to each point of interaction – in depthinterviews– Make sure that senior management conducts at least some of theinterviews• Notorious for not ever speaking with customers in their presentpositions– Compensation to the customers who participate– Choose customers from representative segmentsMapping the Experience
    22. 22. Never presume for the customer– You don’t know what emotional weight they give the interaction– You don’t know what caused that reaction to the interaction– You don’t know why the customer remembers what they rememberWhile doing the interview, ask them general questions designed to triggertheir memories, but do not guide them– Its what they remember, not what you want them to rememberMapping the Experience
    23. 23. Visual (or verbal) cues provide informationbut, you still have to interpret & judge.Mapping the Experience
    24. 24. What does thispicture tell you?I’masleepI’mfrustratedI’m deadMapping the Experience
    25. 25. CASE STUDY: DAVID’S BRIDAL25
    26. 26. Greeting & Registration– Were you greeted when you first camein? If yes, can you describe how you weregreeted?– How would you describe themood/personality of the person whogreeted you? Do you remember whathe/she said? If no, where did yougo, what did you do?– Did any employees ask you if you neededhelp?– How do you feel about not being greeted?– Did you register? If yes, can you describewhat happened?– Did the greeter give you a registration form tofill out or did she fill out the form for you?– What did you think of the length of the time ittook to register?– Were you given catalogs to look through?– Was there a consultant called overimmediately or were you given a realistic timeof how long you would have to wait?– How long did you have to wait for aconsultant to come over and help you?Mapping the Experience
    27. 27. Consultation & Product Selection– What did you think of the consultantyou worked with? How would youdescribe the personality/mood of yourconsultant?– Did your consultant listen well andshow you gowns that were similar towhat you requested?– Was your consultant knowledgeableabout the product/store policies?– Did your consultant spend adequatetime helping you?- Can you describe your experience shoppingfor the gown? Did you pick out the dressesyou wanted to try on or did your consultantpick for you?- Did your consultant show you differentstyles, colors of wedding gowns? Did yourconsultant help you pick out coordinatingaccessories to go with your gown?- How did you feel while trying on your gown?- Did you visit the store more than once beforedeciding to buy your gown? If yes, how manytimes?Mapping the Experience
    28. 28. Other high level examples of questions for mapping– Can you describe your experience shopping for your bridesmaiddresses?– How did your checkout go?– Did you have to order anything? If yes, what happenedthere, how did the process go?– What happened with David’s Bridal between the time youordered your dress and picked it up?Mapping the Experience
    29. 29. CASE STUDIES: MANAGING THE EXPERIENCE
    30. 30. • Colombian Telco• Targeting residentialservice for CTOs
    31. 31. Justin Timberlake“He seems to not take himselftoo seriously and that moxiecan take you a long way. It’sone thing to passively watchsomeone on YouTube. Itsanother to spend $10 on analbum. Personality points helpget that wallet opened.”Keith Caulfield, Billboard assoc.director of charts/retail
    32. 32. • He carefully manages the“Timberlake Experience”– While releasing The 20/20 Experience• He did few interviews• Alignment with trusted brands– Went only on key shows – e.g.JimmyFallon, SNL, SXSW, Grammies– Target-only edition• Controls the consumableexperiencesJustin Timberlake
    33. 33. DELIVERING THE EXPERIENCEThe Quality of Engagement
    34. 34. THE PHILADELPHIA FLYERS
    35. 35. Delivering the Experience• The overarching strategy– Engage the fans all ways– Know each fan’s individuallifestyles to customizeaccordingly– Measure, measure, measure, learn, learn, learn• Two programs– How You Doin’?– Early Birds
    36. 36. Flyers’ Fan EngagementProgram“The How You Doin’? Program is the culture of thisorganization. We are always making sure that we aren’t justimplementing software, but are embedding the philosophy andoutlook into everything we do internally and externally.” -Shawn Tilger, SVP Business Operations, Philadelphia FlyersDelivering the Experience
    37. 37. How You Doin’? Program– All staff at both HQ and Wells Fargo Centertrained to:• Greet everyone who comes intostadium• Answer questions for all comers• To go above and beyond for customers– Staff are rewarded for their success attransmitting the experience• Can be nominated by fans• Get prizes and bonusesHelp driverenewalsDelivering the Experience
    38. 38. How You Doin’ - Facebook How You Doin’ – LinkedinDelivering the Experience
    39. 39. • 87% of all fansgreeted• 97% were highlysatisfiedDoin’ Fine!
    40. 40. Delivering the Experience
    41. 41. Delivering the Experience
    42. 42. • Cool or not, this is still abusiness decision thatneeds to see a return• Went to incentivesbased programDelivering the Experience
    43. 43. • The Early Bird Game Plan: Seasons TicketholderRenewals & Acquisitions– Client development department– Account reps assigned hundreds of accounts each– Use Turnkey to analyze all season ticketholders• Likelihood to renew• 10 categories of criteria• 5-star system– All renewals loaded into system with profiles and ratingsDelivering the Experience
    44. 44. • The Spot Event – 2-3 stars– They book the Hall of Fame Roomat Wells Fargo Center for happyhour– Season’s ticket holders– From ice cream, to icecream, beer, wine, snacks– Renew todayDelivering the Experience
    45. 45. • The Experience– Customers felt that they were getting personalattention in a room that also reminds them of theteam’s rather storied history.– They get food and drink – which really isn’t a lotbut the combination makes the wavering ticketholders feel good.– “You don’t have to have luxury, you only have tofeel luxurious.”Delivering the Experience
    46. 46. Delivering the Experience
    47. 47. The Results?– From 2010 through 2012, seasons ticket renewalswere up more than 1000 from the previous year.Delivering the Experience
    48. 48. • The Steps– Develop an engagement strategy– Define what you’re going to need to do and to have– As you get what you need to have, start doing what you need to do– Flyers case• Strategy• Customer knowledge – KEY segment: KEY individual• Designing the experience• Training for staff• Compensation for staff – reinforcement of the strategy• Be clear on ROI or outcome• ImplementDelivering the Experience
    49. 49. CHOICE, CIRCUMSTANCE, CONTEXT
    50. 50. • The customer experience isoften decided in the firstfew minutes of theinteraction– That means the choices madeby the company in the initialstages are critical to theresults by time interactionends.Choice, Circumstance, Context
    51. 51. • Expectations driven by thegeneral hotel experience– Easy check-in– Recognition of elite status– Courtesy regardless of status– Willingness to explain decisions– Consideration of marital status– Clean rooms– Respect for individual customer’s“space”– Efficient room service– Easy checkout51Choice, Circumstance, Context
    52. 52. • The hotel experience – choice– No points at check-in unlike any other hotel– Lack of courtesy – refusal to explain why thishappened.– Lack of consideration of marital status – doublebeds w/o any foreknowledge– Lack of respect for individual customer’s day –two attempts to sell timeshare w/in hour– Inefficient room service– Not easy checkout – no one at a NY hotel in theearly morning.• The hotel experience –circumstance– Non-working room keys– Broken lamp– Jammed shower handle– Large “unlabeled” lobby –signs difficult to find• The hotel experience –context– Multi-tiered internet pricing– No offer of any concern for late customer service– Dark room – but there was a broken lamp andpoor experience52Choice, Circumstance, Context
    53. 53. Circumstantial events wouldn’tmatter as much53Choice, Circumstance, Context
    54. 54. The Hilton lost a contract that wastheirs to keepChoice, Circumstance, Context
    55. 55. ADVOCATES + COMPANY = LOVE*OUTCOMES
    56. 56. • A continuously excellent experience drives advocacy– Meeting expectations for things important to the customer– Exceeding expectations on occasion to delight the customer– Consistency of the interactions regardless of channel– Engagement at the level the customer is looking for at the timeAdvocacy
    57. 57. The 360° view of the customer is no longer theholy grail. It’s a pre-requisite.The Outcome?
    58. 58. The new holy grail: A company like me.The Outcome

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