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Using Smartphones in the       Classroom   Education in the Digital Age
TraditionHacklock, “Papers” July 18, 2008 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution.
Cybrarian77, “Teacher at Chalkboard” via Flickr, CreativeCommons Attribution.
Passive, not active                                                               learning.Keene and Cheshire County (NH) ...
Carrot and Stick MethodologyOpensourceway, “Carrot + Stick > Love” March 18, 2011via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution
Casey Serin, “Taking a Test at Real EstateInvesting School”, December 11, 2006 viaFlickr, Creative Commons Attribution
Griffithchris, “Red Fail”, July 29, 2009 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution
Uriondo, “Huawei Android Smartphone 1” Ferbruary 16, 2009 via Flickr, Creative CommonsAttribution.
66% OF 8-  18 YEAR OLDS HAVEA CELLPHONE    Gesika22, “Untitled” July 9, 2011 via Flickr, Creative         Commons Attribut...
Kjarrett “No Cell Phones!” November 13, 2010 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribution
Phil Strahl, “Concerned” 2006 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribution
Annavanna “Bullying” November 8, 2010 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribution
Sean MacEntee , “Cheating” January 23, 2011 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribution
Uncle Saiful “Playground” June 18, 2006 via Flickr, Creative CommonsAttribution.
Moyan_Brenn “Beach” September 13, 2011 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution.
AVLXYZ “Mountains-Scotty’s Ski Run” August 13, 2006 via Flickr CreativeCommons Attribution.
Shyha “Pace” August 20, 2006 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribution
Leo Reynolds, Wood Block Plus” October 27, 2011 via Flickr CreativeCommons Attribution.
Leo Reynolds, “Clocks” January 22, 2012 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution.
401K “Piggy Bank” January 20, 2012 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribution.
Aunt Owee “Love” February 2009 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribution
Devar, “Work” November 36, 2004 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribution
Bull3t, “world wide web (www) text” August 3, 2007 via Flickr Creative CommonsAttribution.
Terry Friedman, “Podcast Listen” December 2011 via Flickr CreativeCommons Attribution
Max East, “Humpty Dumpty” December 12, 2009 via Flickr Creative CommonsAttribution.
The Bees, “Surveys to Compile” September 12, 2010 via Flickr CreativeCommons Attribution.
Rubyblossom, “Fields of Gold” January 19, 2006 via Flickr Creative CommonsAttribution.
References•   Abbot, L. (n.d.). Social Learning Theory. Retrieved from University of Texas at Austin website:            h...
AASL Standards Addressed•   1.1.6 - Read, view, and listen for information presented in any format    (e.g., textual, visu...
Using smartphones in the classroom
Using smartphones in the classroom
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Using smartphones in the classroom

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  • The traditional classroom has been based on lectures, rote memorization, and standardized tests. Learning has been based largely on Albert Bandura’s Social Learning Theory, which claims learning occurs within a social context. Abbot, L. (n.d.). Social Learning Theory. Retrieved from University of Texas at Austin website: http://teachnet.edb.utexas.edu/~Lynda_abbot/Social.html
  • Learning can occur through observation, such as watching a teacher demonstrate a mathematical problem on the chalkboard or white board. Abbot, L. (n.d.). Social Learning Theory. Retrieved from University of Texas at Austin website: http://teachnet.edb.utexas.edu/~Lynda_abbot/Social.html
  • Past styles of learning, such as the traditional lecture are giving way to a learning process that is more active and the process is becoming as important as the end product. Students today described as millennials or digital natives want to be involved in the learning process and thrive on interactive technology.Humble-Thaden, M. B. (2011, Winter). Student reflective perceptions of high school education cell phone technology usage. The Journal of Technology Studies, 37(1), 10-16.
  • The behaviorist theory of learning according to B.F. Skinner is also used frequently in the classroom. Students are often conditioned through the use of external motivators such as rewards, token economies, and ultimately grades. Ozmon, H. A., & Craver, S. M. (2008). Philosophical foundations of education. (8th ed.). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson.
  • An example of a traditional external motivator includes the ubiquitous end of unit test.
  • Often though the move from external motivation or external locus of causality to an internal locus of causality does not happen and over time the external motivator or “carrot” loses effectiveness. Stipek, D. (2002). Motivation to learn: Integrating theory and practice. (4th ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
  • How do we make the shift from a traditional paper based classroom to a digital classroom where cell phones are not a distraction, but part of the learning process? Has the time come to utilize this readily available and accessible technology?
  • Cell phone usage topped the 100 million mark in the United States in January, 2012. With the prevalence of this technology, the educational uses need to be explored. comScore. (2012, March 06). comscore reports january 2012 u.s. mobile subscriber market share. Retrieved from http://www.comscore.com/Press_Events/Press_Releases/2012/3/comScore_Reports_January_2012_U.S._Mobile_Subscriber_Market_Share
  • According to the research report Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8- to 18-year olds sponsored by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 66 percent of the 2,000 U.S. students (ages 8-18) surveyed indicated owning a cell phone.Engel, G., & Green, T. (2011, March). Cell phones in the classrom: Are we dialing up disaster? TechTrends: Linking Research & Practice to Improve Learning, 55(2), 39-45. doi:10.1007/s11528-011-0482-z
  • “…many educational institutions in the U.S. have formal policies banning mobile phone use in classrooms and on school grounds, especially in K-12 schools…”Campbell, S. (2006). Perceptions of Mobile Phones in College Classrooms: Ringing, Cheating, and Classroom Policies. Communication Education, 55(3), 280-294. doi:10.1080/03634520600748573
  • Some concerns over using cell phones in the classroom include…
  • One concern over the use of cell phones is the prevelent use of textease or the abbreviated language used commonly to send text messages. It is argued that textease is “destroying our language and our children’s ablility to write”. However, in a study at Coventry University it was found that textease and texting did not negatively impact the development of student’s writing skills, but just the opposite. Students who texted more had better writing skills than their peers who did not text as often.Thomas, K., & McGee, C. (2012, February). The only thing we have to fear is ...120 characters. TechTrends, 56(1), 19-33.
  • Some concerns with using cell phones as a learning tool include bullying and cyberbullying. While this is a well founded concern as the American Life project found 26% of teens reported being bullied or harrassed via text or phone calls through their cell phone. This is just the latest incarnation in bullying behavior and as educators we need to educate students, parents, and peers about cyberbullying and in turn teach online safety skills to stop bullying in the digital format.
  • Another concern is the use of cell phones to cheat on tests or assignments. In a study by Common Sense Media (2010), it was found that one third of high school students used their cell phones to cheat on assignments or tests. However, cheating was not invented with the cell phone, but has been an issue historically in different forms.Thomas, K., & McGee, C. (2012, February). The only thing we have to fear is...120 characters. TechTrends, 56(1), 19-33. Thomas, K., & McGee, C. (2012, February). The only thing we have to fear is ...120 characters. TechTrends, 56(1), 19-33.
  • “It is important to recognize that not all mobile phone use in educational contexts is objectionable…technology for tutoring, accessing Internet resources, and connecting students, instructors, and parents in efforts to coordinate school-related activities. Others have noted the potential of the technology to support anytime, anywhere learning…”.Campbell, S. (2006). Perceptions of Mobile Phones in College Classrooms: Ringing, Cheating, and Classroom Policies. Communication Education, 55(3), 280-294. doi:10.1080/03634520600748573
  • Students want to be able to learn and access information on the go from anywhere….
  • And at anytime…
  • At their own pace.Kolb, L. (2011, February). Adventures with cell phones. Educational Leadership, 68(5), 39-43.
  • Some benefits to using cell phones in the classroom include…
  • One of the benefits of using a smartphone in the classroom is in time savings. Students are already familiar with the technology of the smartphone, so instructional time is not used teaching new technology. More time can be spent on teaching the instructional content.Kolb, L. (2011, February). Adventures with cell phones. Educational Leadership, 68(5), 39-43.
  • Another benefit is in money savings to the school district as a great majority of students already own cell phones. School districts could utilize this resource already in the hands of students and not have to invest widely in new technology.
  • Another benefit to using a smartphone in the classroom is quite simply the students love them. By using technology that they already know and enjoy using it is easier to keep them engaged in the learning process.
  • Finally, students will need to know in many 21st century jobs, how to use cell phones productively to schedule meetings to communicate with others, utilize the internet, gather data, and many other tasks required in their chosen profession.
  • There are many learning opportunities in which cell phones can be used in the classroom from the very basic use as an organizer, calculator, digital camera, dictionary, and research through the internet.Lucking, B., Christman, E., & Wighting, M. (2010, Summer). Hang up and learn: Cell phones in the science classroom. Science Scope, 82-85.
  • Students can utilize cell phones in more creative ways by creating podcasts….Watters, A. (2010, November 16). Cellphones in the classroom: Distraction or tool? Retrieved March 1, 2012, from ReadWriteWeb website: http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/cellphones_in_the_classroom_distraction_or_tool.php
  • digital storybooks…
  • surveys…
  • photo projects, and countless other applications using educational apps or software moving students to be truly Web 2.0 learners
  • Transcript of "Using smartphones in the classroom"

    1. 1. Using Smartphones in the Classroom Education in the Digital Age
    2. 2. TraditionHacklock, “Papers” July 18, 2008 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution.
    3. 3. Cybrarian77, “Teacher at Chalkboard” via Flickr, CreativeCommons Attribution.
    4. 4. Passive, not active learning.Keene and Cheshire County (NH) Historical Photos, “Students in Classroom in Keene NewHampshire” February 15, 2011 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution.
    5. 5. Carrot and Stick MethodologyOpensourceway, “Carrot + Stick > Love” March 18, 2011via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution
    6. 6. Casey Serin, “Taking a Test at Real EstateInvesting School”, December 11, 2006 viaFlickr, Creative Commons Attribution
    7. 7. Griffithchris, “Red Fail”, July 29, 2009 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution
    8. 8. Uriondo, “Huawei Android Smartphone 1” Ferbruary 16, 2009 via Flickr, Creative CommonsAttribution.
    9. 9. 66% OF 8- 18 YEAR OLDS HAVEA CELLPHONE Gesika22, “Untitled” July 9, 2011 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution.
    10. 10. Kjarrett “No Cell Phones!” November 13, 2010 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribution
    11. 11. Phil Strahl, “Concerned” 2006 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribution
    12. 12. Annavanna “Bullying” November 8, 2010 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribution
    13. 13. Sean MacEntee , “Cheating” January 23, 2011 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribution
    14. 14. Uncle Saiful “Playground” June 18, 2006 via Flickr, Creative CommonsAttribution.
    15. 15. Moyan_Brenn “Beach” September 13, 2011 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution.
    16. 16. AVLXYZ “Mountains-Scotty’s Ski Run” August 13, 2006 via Flickr CreativeCommons Attribution.
    17. 17. Shyha “Pace” August 20, 2006 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribution
    18. 18. Leo Reynolds, Wood Block Plus” October 27, 2011 via Flickr CreativeCommons Attribution.
    19. 19. Leo Reynolds, “Clocks” January 22, 2012 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution.
    20. 20. 401K “Piggy Bank” January 20, 2012 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribution.
    21. 21. Aunt Owee “Love” February 2009 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribution
    22. 22. Devar, “Work” November 36, 2004 via Flickr Creative Commons Attribution
    23. 23. Bull3t, “world wide web (www) text” August 3, 2007 via Flickr Creative CommonsAttribution.
    24. 24. Terry Friedman, “Podcast Listen” December 2011 via Flickr CreativeCommons Attribution
    25. 25. Max East, “Humpty Dumpty” December 12, 2009 via Flickr Creative CommonsAttribution.
    26. 26. The Bees, “Surveys to Compile” September 12, 2010 via Flickr CreativeCommons Attribution.
    27. 27. Rubyblossom, “Fields of Gold” January 19, 2006 via Flickr Creative CommonsAttribution.
    28. 28. References• Abbot, L. (n.d.). Social Learning Theory. Retrieved from University of Texas at Austin website: http://teachnet.edb.utexas.edu/~Lynda_abbot/Social.html• Engel, G., & Green, T. (2011, March). Cell phones in the classrom: Are we dialing up disaster? TechTrends: Linking Research & Practice to Improve Learning, 55(2), 39-45. doi:10.1007/s11528-011-0482-z• Fredrick, K. (2011, March). Calling all cell phone users! School Library Monthly, XXVII(6), 40-41.• Humble-Thaden, M. B. (2011, Winter). Student reflective perceptions of high school educatona cell phone technology usage. The Journal of Technology Studies, 37(1), 10-16.• Kolb, L. (2011, February). Adventures with cell phones. Educational Leadership, 68(5), 39-43.• Lucking, B., Christman, E., & Wighting, M. (2010, Summer). Hang up and learn: Cell phones in the science classroom. Science Scope, 82-85.• Ozmon, H., & Craver, S. (2008). Philosophical foundations of education (8th ed.). Upper Saddle River, New Jersy: Pearson.• Stipek, D. (2002). Motivation to learn: Intergrating theory and practice (4th ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.• Thomas, K., & McGee, C. (2012, February). The only thing we have to fear is ...120 characters. TechTrends, 56(1), 19-33.• Watters, A. (2010, November 16). Cellphones in the classroom: Distraction or tool? Retrieved March 1, 2012, from ReadWriteWeb website: http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/cellphones_in_the_classroom_distraction_or_tool .php
    29. 29. AASL Standards Addressed• 1.1.6 - Read, view, and listen for information presented in any format (e.g., textual, visual, media, digital) in order to make inferences and gather meaning.• 1.1.8 - Demonstrate mastery of technology tools for accessing information and pursuing inquiry.• 1.1.9 - Collaborate with others to broaden and deepen understanding.• 1.2.3 - Demonstrate creativity by using multiple resources and formats.• 1.3.3 - Follow ethical and legal guidelines in gathering and using information.• 1.3.5 - Use information technology responsibly.• 2.1.4 - Use technology and other information tools to analyze and organize information.• 2.1.6 - Use the writing process, media and technology skills to create products that express new understandings.• 3.1.2 - Participate and collaborate as members of a social and intellectual network of learners.• 3.1.4 - Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess.• 3.1.6 - Use information and technology ethically and responsibly.• 4.1.7 - Use social networks and information tools to gather and share information.• 4.3.4 - Practice safe and ethical behaviors in personal electronic communication and interaction.
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