Writes of passage competition

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Writes of passage competition

  1. 1. Which title did each member of staff choose as their ‘Writes of Passage’ book?
  2. 2. As a teenager this book was recommended by my English teacher to broaden my rather narrow reading experience. It terrified me. I enjoyed it so much I began to read more science-fiction horror novels which, at the time, I thoroughly enjoyed. Mrs Vincent-Bennett a. The Colour of Magic, Terry Pratchett b. Day of the Triffids, John Wyndham c. The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood
  3. 3. I first read this when I was 14 or 15. I was immediately taken back to a time and place where my father grew up in the 1930s in the ‘Golden Valley’ of the Cotswolds. My father went to the same village school as the author and the book tells of his early childhood, growing up without a father, and of first teenage experiences of love. I’ve since read all this author’s books; I love the poetic style of his writing. Mrs Simons a. Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Thomas Hardy b. Little House on the Prairie, Laura Ingalls Wilder c. Cider with Rosie, Laurie Lee
  4. 4. In those far-off days of linear A-Levels, I didn’t even start my English Literature set texts until after Christmas in the LVI. That first term was spent ‘reading around the subject’ or reading for pleasure. A crash course in 19th Century literature followed but the novel which really hit home did so because it was home! The villages, hamlets, lanes, even the pub, were all within cycling distance of my house. A stunning story which could physically evoke all my senses. What’s not to like? Headmaster a. Leave it to Jeeves, P. G. Wodehouse b. Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Thomas Hardy c. Cider with Rosie, Laurie Lee
  5. 5. This was the first book I read in which the style was more important than the story. I was ill at the time and I was instantly cheered up. I recommend …………..to anyone who wants to disappear into a different world of the most fantastic language and wit. Mr Pollard a. Roots, Alex Haley b. The Colour of Magic, Terry Pratchett c. Leave it to Jeeves, P. G. Wodehouse
  6. 6. Reading this whilst at school inspired my initial interest in History. The book is based on the real life experiences of the Balicki family, who became separated during the Second World War when the Germans took over Poland, and who try to find each other afterwards. Set against such a frightening background of war torn Europe, the book is an exciting read from start to finish. Mr Newsam a. The Silver Sword, Ian Serraillier b. The Chrysallids, John Wyndham c. Public Enemy Number Two, Anthony Horowitz
  7. 7. Hilariously funny, this book (and the series) can still make me laugh out loud today. A cowardly wizard and a chest that has a mind of its own and is called ‘Luggage’ are the main characters. Ridiculous and zany and brilliant! Mr Bradshaw a. The Colour of Magic, Terry Pratchett b. Public Enemy Number Two, Anthony Horowitz c. Leave it to Jeeves, P. G. Wodehouse
  8. 8. This was the first book not known, chosen or recommended by my mother. It felt grown up and was not about toys, bunnies or fairies. I read the whole series and they were better than the TV series. Mrs Bamford a. Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Thomas Hardy b. Little House on the Prairie, Laura Ingalls Wilder c. Cider with Rosie, Laurie Lee
  9. 9. This book got me hooked on dystopian fiction and after studying it for A-Level I became a feminist. Mrs Poole a. The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood b. Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck c. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, Mildred D. Taylor
  10. 10. This dystopian masterpiece had a huge impact upon me when I was a teenager; in fact it sparked my love of science fiction – I still devour SF today! Mrs MacKillop a. The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood b. The Chrysallids, John Wyndham c. Cider with Rosie, Laurie Lee
  11. 11. This was one of a series based on the Diamond Brothers, the eldest of whom, Tim is a rather hapless but likeable private detective. I remember being so enthralled by the series as I was a similar age to the younger brother, Tim, and he came across very well in the books so I always wanted to see how he would get the pair out of the next scrape they found themselves in. Mr Mills a. The Silver Sword, Ian Serraillier b. Night Watch, Terry Pratchett c. Public Enemy Number Two, Anthony Horowitz
  12. 12. This novel forced me to face a world I didn’t know or understand. I encountered nonsensical hatred, that at a young age I didn’t realise existed in the world. However, at the same time I went on a journey of love and redemption, with a girl who, I decided, I would like to be friends with. She was brave and heroic and, above all, made me want to be her. I feel this book made me realise that although humans aren’t perfect, there are some unique and incredible people who will change something forever. Mrs Copeland-Jordan a. Roots, Alex Haley b. The Day of the Triffids, John Wyndham c. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, Mildred D. Taylor
  13. 13. The best horror novel ever! Similar to ‘War of the Worlds’, the story is seen through the eyes of one person: a teacher whose pupil is the first to be attacked by a ……. I went on to read all this author’s books – they’re all real page turners. He’s a master of horror! Mrs Franklin a. The Rats, James Herbert b. The Day of the Triffids, John Wyndham c. The Colour of Magic, Terry Pratchett
  14. 14. My favourite of all the Discworld novels. It’s one of the darkest – Sam Vimes is thrown back in time to the birth of his son to help…himself! It wasn’t the first I read (you need to read some of the earlier ones for the background) but, in my opinion, it’s the best. Hilarious, fun to read and gritty. Mr Hamilton a. The Silver Sword, Ian Serraillier b. Public Enemy Number Two, Anthony Horowitz c. Night Watch, Terry Pratchett
  15. 15. When I read this back in the early seventies I was struck firstly by how the characters in such a short book could be so developed & how they all interacted. At the end of the book I had huge sympathy for one character who had to be cruel to be kind and I cried. This was probably the first book not involving animals where I was moved to cry. Mrs Orbell a. Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck b. The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood c. Leave it to Jeeves, P. G. Wodehouse
  16. 16. My choice gave a very different perspective on the slave trade to much of what had been written before and, though since discredited in parts, it was a powerful illustration of the history of many black and white families in today’s USA. Mrs Ainsworth a. Shantaram, Gregory David Roberts b. Roots, Arthur Haley c. Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck
  17. 17. Influenced by the real life events of a prison escapee who, en route from Australia to Germany, settled in Mumbai. The book follows the turbulent ups and downs of his life in the slums of India. I read this when I was visiting Mumbai at the age of 18 and I remember it having an enormous impact on me. It captures the contrasts of the city through humour, love, suspense and tragedy. An amazing book! Mr Kerr-Dineen a. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, Mildred D. Taylor b. Roots, Arthur Haley c. Shantaram, Gregory David Roberts
  18. 18. Check out the national ‘Writes of Passage’ list published today! www.worldbookday.com/writes-of-passage/

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