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Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh
Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh
Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh
Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh
Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh
Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh
Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh
Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh
Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh
Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh
Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh
Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh
Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh
Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh
Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh
Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh
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Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan Youth in Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh

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  • 1. Research Proposal:A Preliminary Presentation<br />Research Student: Sudeep Pagedar<br />Research Guide: Dr. Chitralekha<br />
  • 2. Young ‘Dhasa’ and Hybridity: Dimensions of Identity among Tibetan youth in McLeodganj, Dharamshala<br />
  • 3. This study will explore various dimensions of the notion of identity learned, adopted – even if temporarily – and internalised (if at all) by Tibetan youth between the ages of 18-25 in McLeodganj, Dharamshala in Himachal Pradesh.<br />
  • 4. Aim<br />To collect primary data for the purpose of research on the mentioned topic, in McLeodganj, Dharamshala, and to back it up with exhaustive secondary data. The analysis of this collected data would help in the verification of the stated hypotheses of this study.<br />
  • 5. Objectives<br />Primary Objective: To explore the notion of ‘identity’ among Tibetan youth in McLeodganj, and see what patterns emerge. Once a particular pattern or patterns has or have been identified, I want to operationalise the predominant ‘identity-feeling’ among the sample.<br />Secondary Objective:Achieving the primary objective will provide for an operationalised understanding of ‘identity’ within a specific situational framework. In this particular context, arriving at an operational definition of ‘identity’ will serve as a starting point for any future research in this area, and will also help to create a rough sketch of what the present generation of Tibetan Diaspora in India thinks of itself with relation to Tibet, China, and India. <br />
  • 6. Research Questions<br />How do Tibetan youth in McLeodganj, Dharamshala perceive themselves in terms of ‘identity’?<br />Is there any predominant ‘identity’ that can be seen as prevalent among a majority of the sample?<br />Does any specific ‘Tibetan identity’ emerge? If so, how can it be operationalised? <br />If no specific ‘Tibetan identity’ emerges, does it then mean that the sample population perceives its identity as ‘hybrid’, that is to say, some parts India, some parts Chinese, and (perhaps) some parts Tibetan?<br /> <br />If a ‘hybrid identity’ is seen as prevalent among the sample, what bearing could this sense of ‘identity’ have upon the future of the geographical-political entity of ‘Tibet’?<br />
  • 7. Conceptual Map<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />Dimensions of Identity Among Tibetan Youth in McLeodganj<br />
  • 8. Overview of Literature<br />Imagined Communities (Benedict Anderson, 1983)<br />Nation and Narration (Homi K. Bhabha, 1990)<br />Differentiation between social groups (Tajfel, 1978)<br />Social Identity Theory (Turner &amp; Brown, 1978)<br />Tibetan refugees in India: religious identity and the forces of modernity (Bibhu Prasad Routray, 2007)<br />The Wretched of the Earth (Frantz Fanon, 1961)<br />Tibet: Call of the Snow Lion (film)<br />Dreaming Lhasa (film)<br />Tibetan Foothold (Dervla Murphy) (book)<br />Documents acquired from the Tibet Information Centre in McLeodganj<br />
  • 9. The 3W1H Approach<br />What: Research Topic + Literature Available<br />Where: Research Area<br />Who: Sample frame / size<br />How: Research Design / Methodology<br />
  • 10. Research Area<br />The choice of the setting is McLeodganj in Dharamshala, Himachal Pradesh because…<br />(a) It is the seat of power of the Tibetan government-in-exile which, recently, has become even more powerful with its acceptance of the resignation of the Tibetans’ temporal leader, the 14th Dalai Lama. (b) It houses one of the largest settlements of Tibetans, both refugees as well as Indian-born and naturalised persons of Tibetan ethnicity in India. Visits to the location have demonstrated that many Tibetan youngsters between the ages of 18 and 25 reside and work there. (c) Tibetan youth there are engaged in professions ranging from activism, to film-making, employment in restaurants, hotels, <br />pharmacies and other professions such as driving vehicles, working in the tourism industry, et cetera. <br />Therefore, an ideal location for primary data collection and for field testing of hypotheses in the study.<br />
  • 11. Methodology<br />Unstructured interviews with various stakeholders (open-ended questions)<br />Biographical method, and within it, the ‘researched life stories’ method (Plummer, 2001)<br />Induction – Grounded Theory (Glasner&amp; Strauss, 1967)… “identity-feeling”<br />
  • 12. Sampling Methods<br />Contacting various categories of people including but not limited to those between the ages of 18-25, who are active or passive stakeholders (in the context of this study) of the Tibetan Diaspora in McLeodganj: students, activists, monks, government officials, etc.<br />Purposive Sampling(a) Considering the most common characteristics of the desired sample-type,(b) Finding out where such individuals can be found in order to study them. Specific cases or individuals might have to be included in the sample if it seems that including them will help the study<br />Snowball SamplingDeveloping the sample progressively after considering a few cases selected at the outset. <br />
  • 13. Sample Frame<br />Tibetan youth associated with organisations such as ‘Students for a Free Tibet’ (SFT), ‘Friends of Tibet’, the ‘Lung-Ta Institute for Former Political Prisoners’, the Amnye Machen Institute (http://www.amnyemachen.org/), the Tibetan Youth Congress (TYC) and the suchlike.<br />
  • 14. Sample Size<br />The sample size will be determined by the principle of Saturation, wherein the characteristic and composition of the sample will be decided on the basis of relevance and diversity. The conceptual map will guide me in determining when to stop collecting data from a particular category of people/ organization/ events. This decision will be based on the repetitiveness of the responses and the realization that enough data has been collected with respect to the concerned category.<br />
  • 15. Ethical Issues (and resolution)<br />Possible unease caused to respondents due to nature of questions… “What is your connection with Tibet?” might evoke memories of torture or might cause pain due to memories of trauma faced by family members/friends.<br />All interviews to be through informed consent<br />Due to potential language problem, will have a young person of Tibetan ethnicity with me during interviews/interaction. This will make it easier to avoid troubling questions, as he/she will be sensitive to things that might set someone off.<br />Will try and get respondents who are willing to talk to me, through organizations such as Lungta, SFT, Friends of Tibet, TYC, etc.<br />Due to my familiarity with the place and to an extent the religion and culture of the Tibetans living there, I would be sensitive to their beliefs, thoughts and practices (cultural and otherwise), and will consciously avoid causing any hurt/harm through my questions.<br />If I notice that my data collection process is hurting any members of the community, I intend to cease my actions immediately and take the advice of community members on how to proceed further, in addition to consulting my guide.<br />However, to the best of my knowledge, I cannot anticipate such problems cropping up during my data collection process. <br />
  • 16. “too-je-che”Thank You<br />

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