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Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-Arabic
Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-Arabic
Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-Arabic
Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-Arabic
Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-Arabic
Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-Arabic
Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-Arabic
Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-Arabic
Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-Arabic
Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-Arabic
Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-Arabic
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Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-Arabic

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  • 1. Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-Arabic Sualeh Fatehi 1993Although it may seem easy to learn how to form Roman numbers from Hindu-Arabic, and vice versa, theanalysis is quite involved. An analysis of the inter-conversions would lead to the development of amethod or methods of performing these conversions easily. Based on these algorithms, computerprograms could be written to interconvert Roman and Hindu-Arabic numbers, while at the same timechecking that they are not performing the task on incorrectly formed Roman numbers. As the followingdiscussion will show, checking for wrongly formed Roman numbers is more difficult than the actualconversions.Roman numbers are formed differently from Hindu-Arabic numbers, for although based on the radix 10,only two digits are available upto ten videlicet I and V. In addition to this there are other symbols fornumbers ten and greater: X, L, C, D and M, in that order.Therefore, the values of Roman numerals in order are:I 1 V 5X 10 L 50C 100 D 500M 1000Table 1Those on the left may be termed as belonging to the ones group, and those on the right to the fivesgroup.Other numbers are formed by additive or subtractive sequences of these numerals: VI = 6 (additive) andIV = 4 (subtractive). Also, there is no zero, even to be used as a placeholder.This is in contrast to Hindu-Arabic numbers, which have ten digits (being based on 10, and having onedigit for every number up to ten, with zero being used as a placeholder or as a null value). The value ofthe digit depends on its position in the number: 9 followed by two other digits indicates a magnitude of900, but if followed by three digits indicates 9000. Therefore, the Hindu-Arabic system of ciphering is apositional one consisting solely of additive sequences.Because of the positional property of the Hindu-Arabic system, conversion of Hindu-Arabic to Roman isextremely simple, and can be done simply by looking up a table (Table 2) for each digit in a particularposition, and collating the sequence.
  • 2. Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-ArabicSualeh Fatehi Digit 000 00 0 Sequence 0 - - - - - 1 M C X I additive 2 MM CC XX II additive 3 MMM CCC XXX III additive 4 - CD XL IV subtractive 5 - D L V additive 6 - DC LX VI additive 7 - DCC LXX VII additive 8 - DCCC LXXX VIII additive 9 - CM XC IX subtractiveTable 2Thus, 1964 = 1/9/6/4 = M/CM/LX/IV = MCMLXIV, and1001 = 1/0/0/1 = M///I = MI.The reverse process, though, is not so easy, because we do not know inadvance where to place thebreaks. So, we use another technique, andthat is of remembering the value of the previous Romannumeral read. Ifthe current value (the value of the digit being read, while the digitsare read from right toleft) is greater than or equal to the previousone read, add it, or else subtract it.For example:<>>><>MCMLXIV = 5 - 1 + 10 + 50 + 1000 - 100 + 1000 = 1964Using this technique, the reverse conversion from Roman to Hindu-Arabic becomes equally easy.If a computer program is to be written to convert Roman numbers to Hindu-Arabic, it should be able tocheck whether the input is invalid. The above method of conversion has the drawback that it willtranslate IIV to 5 and IM to 999, both of which are wrong: it cannot identify invalid Roman numbers.We may therefore make an observation that to form a valid Roman number, there are restrictions onboth the position of a digit and the number of times it may appear consecutively. (These restrictions donot apply to the Hindu-Arabic system, in which if all the characters making up a number are digits, thenumber is valid.)We now proceed to examine all cases of unacceptable Roman numbers inductively.The first case, of course, is that of a character appearing in a Roman number that is not an acceptableRoman digit (for example CMA). This is trivial, and easily disposed of.Secondly, we take up the criterion of repetition. In an additive sequence, no digit may appear more thanthrice, if it is of the ones group, or more than once if it belongs to the fives group: for instance VIIII andVVI are invalid. Also, in a subtractive sequence, no member of the ones group may appear more thanonce, and a fives group member may not appear at all. (This condition would render subtractivesequences like IIX and IXX invalid.) 2|Page
  • 3. Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-ArabicSualeh FatehiThirdly, we take up position, by consideration of value. In additive sequences, two Roman numerals ofany value may be juxtaposed (MI = 1001). However, in subtractive sequences only the following mayimmediately precede the digits given in Table 3 below. I - V I X I L X C X D C M C - -Table 3(This may be observed from Table 2.)Fourthly, we come to general subtractive sequences. Subtractive sequences can only be two symbolslong (Table 2). Hence by examining every possible set of three consecutive numerals in a Romannumber, we can identify invalid numbers. This examination has to be done by value, and also by group.The first column in Table 4 below, which is marked `Group, shows what follows in the same row. If arow is marked as 151, the first and third numeral of a triplet found in this row is of the ones group, thesecond of the fives group. In the same table, this diagrammatic notation indicates three numerals risingin value, / and then falling, the third being the smallest of the three. Other markings may be similarly understood.In this table also only the smallest possible triplet of numerals for each type is given, because for theother triplets of the same type, the conclusions drawn will hold good if the triplet is not invalidated bythe repetition or position criteria. Taking XCI, we find other triplets of the same type: XMI, CMX, CMI.Here we find that XMI has already been invalidated by the above criterion of position, while for CMXand CMI we may draw the same conclusions as for XCI: that they are valid. The two parts of Table 4taken together cover all possible types of triplets, and are the basis for forming general rules of what ispossible and not possible. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 / / / / / / ___ ___ / / / / / / / ___ ___/ 111 IXC CXI XCI ICX XIC CIX IXI XIX IXX XXI XII IIX 115 IXL CXV XCV IXV XIL XIV - - - XXV - IIV 151 IVX XVI XLI ILX XVC CVX IVI XVX - - - - 511 VXC LXI VXI VCX VIX LIX - - VXX - VII - 551 VLC LVI VLI VLX LVC LVX - - - VVI - VVX 515 VXL LXV LCV VCL VIL LIV VXV VIV - - - - 155 IVL CLV XLV ILV XVL CVL - - IVV - XVV - 555 VLD DLV LDV VDL LVD DVL VLV LVL VLL LLV LVV VVLred= invalid; green = validTable 4An alternative way of forming Roman numbers is writing IIII for 4 and VIIII for 9, and so on. Thisconvention of representing Roman numbers is not considered in this discussion, because it renders a 3|Page
  • 4. Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-ArabicSualeh Fatehidetailed analysis unnecessary. The conditions for checking validity are greatly reduced. As long as amember of the ones group appears not more than four times, and a member of the fives group notmore than once, the Roman number is valid if all the numerals appear in descending order (this being sobecause subtractive sequences are eliminated). Conversion is then done by simply adding up all thevalues represented by the numerals making up the number. The other difference between the formermethod, and this alternative method is the magnitude of the largest number that can be represented. If4 is written as IIII, then by the same token, 4000 is written as MMMM, and so the largest number that itis possible to represent is 4999. As against this, using the former convention, the largest number thatcan be represented is 3999.We now proceed to develop an analytical procedure for performing the conversion: 1. If there are any invalid characters, the Roman number is invalid. 2. a. If a member of the ones group appears more than thrice consecutively, the number is invalid. b. If a member of the fives group appears more than once consecutively, the number is invalid. 3. The following numerals cannot appear anywhere before those given in Table 5. I - V - X V L I, V C I, V, L D I, V, X, L M I, V, X, L, D - - Table 5 Table 5 may be succinctly expressed by the rule that if a number is preceded by another that is smaller, the smaller value may only be either one-tenth or one-fifth of the larger. 4. Examining every possible consecutive set of three numerals, (in MCMLXIV: MCM, CML, MLX, LXI and XIV are examined), a set is invalid if: a. the last is greater than the first (this checks for the combinations appearing in columns 1, 4, 5, 9 and 12 of Table 4, all of which are invalid) b. the first and last digits of the triplet are the same, and different from the first; but if all three belong to the ones group, and the second is less then the first the triplet is valid (this condition is developed from columns 7 and 8 of Table 4) A single invalid triplet makes the whole Roman number invalid.Conditions 3 and 4(a) both check for a wide variety of invalid sequences, but the checks in condition 4are easier to perform. In the above procedure, if conditions 3 and 4 are interchanged, an invalid Romannumber will be detected faster, with less effort. However, a number can be known to be valid only afterall the checks have been performed.Although it is possible to write a computer program to check analytically for invalid input, and thenconvert, this is certainly an inefficient way of solving the problem. Taking advantage of the computer asa calculating machine, and the simplicity of back and forth conversions, the easiest computer solution tothe problem of converting Roman numbers to Hindu-Arabic, and checking for invalid input would be: 1. Convert the Roman number to its equivalent Hindu- Arabic using the method of remembering the previous digit. 2. Convert back from Hindu-Arabic to Roman. 4|Page
  • 5. Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-ArabicSualeh Fatehi 3. Check the original Roman number against the converted one obtained from step 2. If they are the same, the Roman number is valid, so output the Hindu-Arabic equivalent. If different, the input is to be rejected. Finally, it is unlikely that the human mind works on conversions from Roman to Hindu-Arabic using an analytical method. It is equally unlikely that it uses the method that a computer may be programmed to use. It seems to work by inserting breaks in the Roman number, analysing for absurdities, changing the positions of the breaks, and reanalysing: repeatedly, until either a solution is found, or all possible positions of breaks are exhausted.For example, 1961 (MCMLXI) may be analysed as follows:MC/M/L/XI absurdM/CM/L/XI not correctM/CM/LX/I =1961(It may be parenthetically noted that while the first system of breaks is definitely wrong, the second maybe acceptable to a person not rigidly Hindu-Arabic.)Another example: VIVV/IV absurdVI/V also absurdAll combinations of breaks having been explored, the number is declared to be nonsensical.Thus, having seen three different methods of conversion of Roman numbers to Hindu-Arabic decimal,that is an analytical method, a method suited to computers, and one that is intuitive, we realise thateach is good for a particular situation. A computer program that follows the analytical method will takemore time than one that converts by the second method. On the other hand, if one wants to manuallyconvert a Roman number, and be absolutely sure of not making a mistake, one will not rely on intuition,and probably opt for the analytical algorithm. 5|Page
  • 6. Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-ArabicSualeh FatehiAppendix 11 :2 : /* ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~3 : @@@ @@@@ | Converts Roman numbers to Hindu-Arabic4 : @@ @ | by an analytical method.5 : @@ @@@ |6 : @@@ @ | Program by Sualeh Fatehi.7 : |8 : ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ */9 :10 :11 : /* *12 : * Converts Roman numbers to Hindu-Arabic decimal equivalents, *13 : * by an analytical method, taking care of invalid input, *14 : * for which the equivalent is 0 *15 : * */16 :17 :18 : /* specification of include files */19 : #include <stdio.h>20 : #include <string.h>21 : /* end specification of include files */22 :23 : /* definition of global constants */24 : #define TRUE 125 : #define FALSE 026 : #define MAXLEN 2027 : #define MAXNUMERALS 728 : /* end definition of global constants */29 :30 : /* function prototypes */31 :int main (int, char **, char **);32 :int convert (char *);33 : /* end function prototypes */34 :35 :36 :int main (intargc, char **argv, char **envp)37 : {38 :39 : /* declaration of automatic variables */40 : char roman[MAXLEN] = "";41 : /* end declaration of automatic variables */42 :43 : /* get the Roman number, convert it to Hindu-Arabic,44 : and print the result */45 : return (printf ("%dn", convert (gets (roman))));46 :47 : } /* end main */48 :49 :50 :51 :int convert (char *roman)52 : /* converts a Roman number to its Hindu-Arabic equivalent,53 : * using an analytical method, which checks for invalid input:54 : * the converted value is returned, or 0 if the string was 6|Page
  • 7. Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-ArabicSualeh Fatehi55 : * an invalid Roman number56 : */57 : {58 :59 : /* declaration of automatic variables */60 :struct {61 : char romanchar;62 :int value;63 : } numerals[MAXNUMERALS] = {{I, 1}, {V, 5}, {X, 10},64 : {L, 50}, {C, 100}, {D, 500},65 : {M, 1000}};66 :inthindu_arabic = 0;67 :intmaxrepeat = 3, repeatcnt = 0;68 :int length, loop, aloop;69 :int current = 0, previous = 0;70 :int found;71 : /* end declaration of automatic variables */72 :73 : /* find the length of the roman number */74 : length = strlen (roman);75 :76 : /* examine a character at a time, and exit if the77 : character is not a Roman numeral: also store the78 : offsets of the numeral, for future comparison */79 : for (aloop = 0; aloop< length; aloop++) {80 :81 : /* examine the character for a valid Roman numeral, and find82 : which one it is: only uppercase I, V, X, L, C, D and M are83 : valid */84 : found = FALSE;85 : for (loop = 0; loop < MAXNUMERALS; loop++) {86 : if (numerals[loop].romanchar == roman[aloop]) {87 : found = TRUE;88 : roman[aloop] = loop;89 : break;90 : } /* end if */91 : } /* end for */92 : if (!found) return 0;93 :94 : } /* end for */95 :96 : /* begin the analytical examination */97 : for (aloop = length-1; aloop>= 0; aloop--) {98 :99 : /* define current and previous values */100 : current = numerals[roman[aloop]].value;101 : previous = ((aloop + 1) <= (length - 1)) ?102 : numerals[roman[aloop+1]].value : 0;103 :104 : /* check if the numeral has been repeated more often than105 : allowed (maxrepeat) by keeping a count of the number106 : of times it appears (repeatcnt) */107 : if (current != previous) {108 :repeatcnt = 0;109 : if (roman[aloop] % 2 == 0)110 :maxrepeat = 3;111 : else112 :maxrepeat = 1;113 : } /* end if */ 7|Page
  • 8. Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-ArabicSualeh Fatehi114 : if (current == previous)115 :repeatcnt++;116 : if (current < previous)117 :maxrepeat = 1;118 : if (repeatcnt>= maxrepeat)119 : return 0;120 :121 : /* checking each triplet of numerals for invalid sets */122 : if (aloop> 1) {123 : /* check if a smaller numeral appears two places before124 : a larger one */125 : if (numerals[roman[aloop-2]].value < current)126 : return 0;127 : /* if the first and third are equal, and the second128 : different, the triplet (and Roman number) is129 : invalid: except in the case where all belong to the130 : ones group (I, X, C, M), and the second is less131 : the first */132 : if (roman[aloop] == roman[aloop-2]) {133 : if ((roman[aloop] != roman[aloop-1]) &&134 : !((roman[aloop] > roman[aloop-1])135 :&& roman[aloop] % 2 == 0136 :&& roman[aloop-1] % 2 == 0))137 : return 0;138 : } /* end if */139 : } /* end if */140 :141 : /* check if a numeral appears before one that it is not142 : allowed to appear before */143 : for (loop = 0; (loop <aloop); loop++) {144 : if (roman[loop] < roman[aloop]) {145 : if ((roman[loop] % 2) != 0)146 : return 0;147 : if (roman[loop] < roman[aloop] - 2)148 : return 0;149 : } /* end if */150 : } /* end for */151 :152 : /* add value to the accumulator, or subtract, depending on the153 : previous value read */154 : if (current < previous)155 :hindu_arabic -= current;156 : else157 :hindu_arabic += current;158 :159 : } /* end for */160 :161 : /* return the converted value */162 : return hindu_arabic;163 :164 : } /* end convert */165 :166 :167 : /* ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ */168 : 8|Page
  • 9. Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-ArabicSualeh FatehiAppendix 21 :2 : /* ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~3 : @@@ @@@@ | Converts Roman numbers to Hindu-Arabic4 : @@ @ | by coverting to and back.5 : @@ @@@ |6 : @@@ @ | Program by Sualeh Fatehi.7 : |8 : ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ */9 :10 :11 : /* *12 : * Converts Roman numbers to Hindu-Arabic decimal equivalents, *13 : * by converting first using the method of remembering the *14 : * previous value, and converting back to Roman, and checking *15 : * against the original: this takes care of invalid input, for *16 : * which the equivalent is 0 *17 : * */18 :19 :20 : /* specification of include files */21 : #include <stdio.h>22 : #include <string.h>23 : /* end specification of include files */24 :25 : /* definition of global constants */26 : #define TRUE 127 : #define FALSE 028 : #define MAXLEN 2029 : #define MAXNUMERALS 730 : /* end definition of global constants */31 :32 : /* function prototypes */33 :int main (int, char **, char **);34 :int convert (char *);35 : /* end function prototypes */36 :37 :38 :int main (intargc, char **argv, char **envp)39 : {40 :41 : /* declaration of automatic variables */42 : char roman[MAXLEN];43 : /* end declaration of automatic variables */44 :45 : /* get the Roman number, convert it to Hindu-Arabic,46 : and print the result */47 : return (printf ("%dn", convert (gets (roman))));48 :49 : } /* end main */50 :51 :52 :53 :int convert (char *roman)54 : /* converts Roman numbers to Hindu-Arabic decimal equivalents, 9|Page
  • 10. Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-ArabicSualeh Fatehi55 : * by converting first using the method of remembering the56 : * previous value, and converting back to Roman, and checking57 : * against the original: this takes care of invalid input, for58 : * which the equivalent is 059 : */60 : {61 :62 : /* declaration of automatic variables */63 :struct {64 : char romanchar;65 :int value;66 : } numerals[MAXNUMERALS] = {{I, 1}, {V, 5}, {X, 10},67 : {L, 50}, {C, 100}, {D, 500},68 : {M, 1000}};69 :inthindu_arabic = 0, copy = 0;70 :int length, current = 0, previous = 0;71 : char newroman[MAXLEN] = "";72 :int size, digit, loop, place = 1000;73 : /* end declaration of automatic variables */74 :75 : /* converting the Roman number to Hindu-Arabic: although76 : * checking for invalid Roman numerals is done, there no77 : * checking for invalid sequences: 0 is returned on78 : * encountering an invalid Roman numeral79 : */80 :81 : /* examine a character at a time */82 : for (length = strlen (roman) - 1; length >= 0; length--) {83 :84 : /* examine the character for a valid Roman numeral, and find85 : which one it is: only uppercase I, V, X, L, C, D and M are86 : valid */87 : current = 0;88 : for (loop = 0; loop < MAXNUMERALS; loop++)89 : if (numerals[loop].romanchar == roman[length]) {90 : current = numerals[loop].value;91 : break;92 : }; /* end if .. for */93 : /* return if an invalid digit is found */94 : if (current == 0) return 0;95 :96 : /* add value to the accumulator, or subtract, depending on the97 : previous value read */98 : if (current < previous)99 :hindu_arabic -= current;100 : else101 :hindu_arabic += current;102 :103 : /* store the previous values, and repeat the loop */104 : previous = current;105 :106 : } /* end for */107 :108 :109 : /* converting from Hindu-Arabic to Roman: each digit is110 : * isolated, and the equivalent found, which is then111 : * concatenated to the Roman number; it returns 0 if the112 : * Hindu-Arabic number is out of range (0 to 4000)113 : */ 10 | P a g e
  • 11. Conversion of Roman Numbers to Hindu-ArabicSualeh Fatehi114 :115 : /* check if the number is within the range */116 : if (hindu_arabic< 1 || hindu_arabic> 3999) return 0;117 :118 : /* make a copy, which will be broken up for its digits */119 : copy = hindu_arabic;120 :121 : length = 0;122 :123 : for (size = 4; size > 0; size--) {124 :125 : /* taking a digit at a time, starting with the most126 : significant one */127 : digit = copy / place;128 : copy %= place;129 : place /= 10;130 :131 : /* converting each digit into its equivalent Roman form, and132 : concatenating */133 : switch (digit) {134 : case 0:135 : break;136 : case 9:137 :newroman[length++] = numerals[2*size-2].romanchar;138 :newroman[length++] = numerals[2*size].romanchar;139 : break;140 : case 4:141 :newroman[length++] = numerals[2*size-2].romanchar;142 : digit++;143 : /* fall through */144 : default:145 : if (digit >= 5) {146 :newroman[length++] = numerals[2*size-1].romanchar;147 : digit -= 5;148 : } /* end if */149 : for (loop = 0; loop < digit; loop++)150 :newroman[length++] = numerals[2*size-2].romanchar;151 : break;152 : } /* end switch */153 : } /* end for */154 :newroman[length] = 0;155 :156 : /* if the converted form is the same as the Roman number157 : input, print the Hindu-Arabic equivalent, else the input is158 : invalid: signal this by returning 0 */159 : if (strcmp (roman, newroman) == 0)160 : return hindu_arabic;161 : else162 : return 0;163 :164 : } /* end convert */165 :166 :167 : /* ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ */168 : 11 | P a g e

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