• Save
The Evolution of Stuttering Therapy: Part 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

The Evolution of Stuttering Therapy: Part 1

on

  • 1,864 views

This presentation details the evolution of stuttering therapy.

This presentation details the evolution of stuttering therapy.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,864
Views on SlideShare
1,859
Embed Views
5

Actions

Likes
2
Downloads
0
Comments
2

2 Embeds 5

http://www.linkedin.com 3
http://www.slideshare.net 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Apple Keynote

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Thank you for your comments and corrections. More than an exact history, this presentation is meant to show that treatment has to progress along with research.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • I find the overall progression of the focus of professional interest/therapy and treatment to be quite accurate, the persons whose pictures were chosen to illustrate each period are somewhat inaccurate, e.g. I studied Joe Sheehan and was out with my MA by 1965 what his picture appears. Also the use of electronic devices has a much longer history than the program implies. Also, focus of the program is pretty much on adult stutterer research and treatment; there is little sensitivity to children with the exception of the mention of Lidcombe. Also, the Diagnosogenic Theory that dominated the management of stuttering is not mentioned.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • He believed the nature of the stuttered event would reveal the nature of the disorder and the pathway to treatment <br /> <br /> Came to see stuttering as an anxiety-motivated avoidant response that becomes <br /> conditioned to cues associated with its occurrence. <br /> Speakers learn to react abnormally to normal disfluencies
  • He believed the nature of the stuttered event would reveal the nature of the disorder and the pathway to treatment <br /> <br /> Came to see stuttering as an anxiety-motivated avoidant response that becomes <br /> conditioned to cues associated with its occurrence. <br /> Speakers learn to react abnormally to normal disfluencies
  • He believed the nature of the stuttered event would reveal the nature of the disorder and the pathway to treatment <br /> <br /> Came to see stuttering as an anxiety-motivated avoidant response that becomes <br /> conditioned to cues associated with its occurrence. <br /> Speakers learn to react abnormally to normal disfluencies
  • He believed the nature of the stuttered event would reveal the nature of the disorder and the pathway to treatment <br /> <br /> Came to see stuttering as an anxiety-motivated avoidant response that becomes <br /> conditioned to cues associated with its occurrence. <br /> Speakers learn to react abnormally to normal disfluencies
  • He believed the nature of the stuttered event would reveal the nature of the disorder and the pathway to treatment <br /> <br /> Came to see stuttering as an anxiety-motivated avoidant response that becomes <br /> conditioned to cues associated with its occurrence. <br /> Speakers learn to react abnormally to normal disfluencies
  • He believed the nature of the stuttered event would reveal the nature of the disorder and the pathway to treatment <br /> <br /> Came to see stuttering as an anxiety-motivated avoidant response that becomes <br /> conditioned to cues associated with its occurrence. <br /> Speakers learn to react abnormally to normal disfluencies
  • He believed the nature of the stuttered event would reveal the nature of the disorder and the pathway to treatment <br /> <br /> Came to see stuttering as an anxiety-motivated avoidant response that becomes <br /> conditioned to cues associated with its occurrence. <br /> Speakers learn to react abnormally to normal disfluencies
  • He believed the nature of the stuttered event would reveal the nature of the disorder and the pathway to treatment <br /> <br /> Came to see stuttering as an anxiety-motivated avoidant response that becomes <br /> conditioned to cues associated with its occurrence. <br /> Speakers learn to react abnormally to normal disfluencies
  • He believed the nature of the stuttered event would reveal the nature of the disorder and the pathway to treatment <br /> <br /> Came to see stuttering as an anxiety-motivated avoidant response that becomes <br /> conditioned to cues associated with its occurrence. <br /> Speakers learn to react abnormally to normal disfluencies
  • He believed the nature of the stuttered event would reveal the nature of the disorder and the pathway to treatment <br /> <br /> Came to see stuttering as an anxiety-motivated avoidant response that becomes <br /> conditioned to cues associated with its occurrence. <br /> Speakers learn to react abnormally to normal disfluencies
  • He believed the nature of the stuttered event would reveal the nature of the disorder and the pathway to treatment <br /> <br /> Came to see stuttering as an anxiety-motivated avoidant response that becomes <br /> conditioned to cues associated with its occurrence. <br /> Speakers learn to react abnormally to normal disfluencies
  • He believed the nature of the stuttered event would reveal the nature of the disorder and the pathway to treatment <br /> <br /> Came to see stuttering as an anxiety-motivated avoidant response that becomes <br /> conditioned to cues associated with its occurrence. <br /> Speakers learn to react abnormally to normal disfluencies
  • He believed the nature of the stuttered event would reveal the nature of the disorder and the pathway to treatment <br /> <br /> Came to see stuttering as an anxiety-motivated avoidant response that becomes <br /> conditioned to cues associated with its occurrence. <br /> Speakers learn to react abnormally to normal disfluencies
  • He believed the nature of the stuttered event would reveal the nature of the disorder and the pathway to treatment <br /> <br /> Came to see stuttering as an anxiety-motivated avoidant response that becomes <br /> conditioned to cues associated with its occurrence. <br /> Speakers learn to react abnormally to normal disfluencies
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • Research consisted of studies concerning the variation of the stuttered event under different experimental conditions <br /> Found that stuttering behaves like a response to to some cues <br /> Van thought stuttering was a reaction to words improperly patterned <br /> SM seeks to normalize reactions to stuttered events - react calmly without struggle <br /> Neither believed in trying to get people to be fluent <br /> Developed procedures and tried to justify them
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • anticipatory struggle behavior - defensive behavior
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • No need to understand the nature of stuttered events. They could be changed by stimulus control. Looked for procedures that could reliably reduce stuttering in the lab. <br /> <br /> FS seeks to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of stuttering events <br /> Speak in a way so there won&#x2019;t have interruptions
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency
  • Both FS and SM focus on altering behavior associated with the occurrence of stutter events <br /> Concern is largely centered on the speaker&#x2019;s reaction to disfluency

The Evolution of Stuttering Therapy: Part 1 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. ADVANCES IN STUTTERING THERAPY Barbara L. Dahm CCC-SLP Board Recognized Specialist - Fluency Disorders 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995 Today
  • 2. PROGRESS NT H 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995 Today
  • 3. PROGRESS TREATMENT RESEARCH 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995 Today
  • 4. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Assumptions without scientific proof Theory • Defect in the structure/function of speech mechanism • Constitutional problem caused by cerebral dominance of the wrong hemisphere • Symptom of psychopathology • Lack of harmony between thought and speech Wendell Johnson 1935
  • 5. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Assumptions without scientific proof • Breathing exercises Theory • Vocal and articulatory gymnastics • Psychoanalytic therapy • Defect in the structure/function of • Solving environmental disturbances speech mechanism • Think about what you say before you • Constitutional problem caused by say it cerebral dominance of the wrong • Changing handedness hemisphere • Symptom of psychopathology • Lack of harmony between thought and speech Wendell Johnson 1935
  • 6. 1935
  • 7. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Conditions that affect degree of stuttering ‣ Relationship between stuttering and…… ‣ Personality characteristics of the person who stutters Theory • Neurotic personality • Learned behavior • Outward symptom of inner conflict Charles Van Riper 1935 1945
  • 8. RESEARCH TREATMENT • Mental hygiene ‣ Conditions that affect degree of stuttering • Eliminate fear ‣ Relationship between stuttering and…… • Building self confidence ‣ Personality characteristics of the person • Mental and physical relaxation who stutters • Desensitization Theory • Neurotic personality • Learned behavior • Outward symptom of inner conflict Charles Van Riper 1935 1945
  • 9. RESEARCH TREATMENT • Mental hygiene ‣ Conditions that affect degree of stuttering • Eliminate fear ‣ Relationship between stuttering and…… • Building self confidence ‣ Personality characteristics of the person • Mental and physical relaxation who stutters • Desensitization • Voluntary stuttering Theory • More relaxed stuttering • Neurotic personality • Cancellations • Learned behavior • Pullouts • Outward symptom of inner conflict • Preparatory sets • Rhythmic coordination of speech Charles Van Riper 1935 1945
  • 10. RESEARCH TREATMENT • Mental hygiene ‣ Conditions that affect degree of stuttering • Eliminate fear ‣ Relationship between stuttering and…… • Building self confidence ‣ Personality characteristics of the person • Mental and physical relaxation who stutters • Desensitization • Voluntary stuttering Theory • More relaxed stuttering • Neurotic personality • Cancellations • Learned behavior • Pullouts • Outward symptom of inner conflict • Preparatory sets • Rhythmic coordination of speech • Family therapy Charles Van Riper 1935 1945
  • 11. 1935 1945
  • 12. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ How people learn to stutter ‣ Attempts to prove current theories ‣ Personality dynamics of related to stuttering ‣ Nature of stuttering Theory • Stuttering is interruptions in the forward flow of speech • Stuttering is determined by inner conflict, attitudes, self-perceptions and mode of self-protection • Communicative disorder characterized by fear Joseph Sheehan 1935 1945 1965
  • 13. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ How people learn to stutter Psychological approaches ‣ Attempts to prove current theories • Role Therapy ‣ Personality dynamics of related to • Release anxiety stuttering • Psychodynamic therapy ‣ Nature of stuttering Theory • Stuttering is interruptions in the forward flow of speech • Stuttering is determined by inner conflict, attitudes, self-perceptions and mode of self-protection • Communicative disorder characterized by fear Joseph Sheehan 1935 1945 1965
  • 14. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ How people learn to stutter Psychological approaches ‣ Attempts to prove current theories • Role Therapy ‣ Personality dynamics of related to • Release anxiety stuttering • Psychodynamic therapy ‣ Nature of stuttering Theory Stuttering modification • Stuttering is interruptions in the • Voluntary stuttering forward flow of speech • More relaxed stuttering • Stuttering is determined by inner • Cancellations, pullouts, preparatory conflict, attitudes, self-perceptions and sets mode of self-protection • Rhythmic coordination of speech • Communicative disorder characterized by fear Joseph Sheehan 1935 1945 1965
  • 15. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ How people learn to stutter Psychological approaches ‣ Attempts to prove current theories • Role Therapy ‣ Personality dynamics of related to • Release anxiety stuttering • Psychodynamic therapy ‣ Nature of stuttering Theory Stuttering modification • Stuttering is interruptions in the • Voluntary stuttering forward flow of speech • More relaxed stuttering • Stuttering is determined by inner • Cancellations, pullouts, preparatory conflict, attitudes, self-perceptions and sets mode of self-protection • Rhythmic coordination of speech • Communicative disorder characterized by fear • Group therapy Joseph Sheehan 1935 1945 1965
  • 16. 1935 1945 1965
  • 17. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Operant conditioning of fluency ‣ Learning theory ‣ Delayed auditory feedback ‣ Differences between stuttering and normal disfluency ‣ Relationship to communicative factors Theory • Stuttering is learned behavior • Distortions in speech breathing, vocal onsets, articulator movement • Fluency can be shaped Ronald L. Webster 1935 1945 1965 1975
  • 18. RESEARCH TREATMENT Fluency shaping techniques ‣ Operant conditioning of fluency • Breathing exercises ‣ Learning theory • Gentle onsets ‣ Delayed auditory feedback • Light articulatory contacts ‣ Differences between stuttering and • Constant monitoring normal disfluency • Rate control ‣ Relationship to communicative factors Theory • Stuttering is learned behavior • Distortions in speech breathing, vocal onsets, articulator movement • Fluency can be shaped Ronald L. Webster 1935 1945 1965 1975
  • 19. RESEARCH TREATMENT Fluency shaping techniques ‣ Operant conditioning of fluency • Breathing exercises ‣ Learning theory • Gentle onsets ‣ Delayed auditory feedback • Light articulatory contacts ‣ Differences between stuttering and • Constant monitoring normal disfluency • Rate control ‣ Relationship to communicative factors Theory • Psychological approaches • Stuttering is learned behavior • Distortions in speech breathing, vocal onsets, articulator movement • Fluency can be shaped Ronald L. Webster 1935 1945 1965 1975
  • 20. RESEARCH TREATMENT Fluency shaping techniques ‣ Operant conditioning of fluency • Breathing exercises ‣ Learning theory • Gentle onsets ‣ Delayed auditory feedback • Light articulatory contacts ‣ Differences between stuttering and • Constant monitoring normal disfluency • Rate control ‣ Relationship to communicative factors Theory • Psychological approaches • Stuttering is learned behavior Stuttering modification • Distortions in speech breathing, • Voluntary stuttering vocal onsets, articulator movement • Advertising stuttering • Fluency can be shaped Ronald L. Webster 1935 1945 1965 1975
  • 21. RESEARCH TREATMENT Fluency shaping techniques ‣ Operant conditioning of fluency • Breathing exercises ‣ Learning theory • Gentle onsets ‣ Delayed auditory feedback • Light articulatory contacts ‣ Differences between stuttering and • Constant monitoring normal disfluency • Rate control ‣ Relationship to communicative factors Theory • Psychological approaches • Stuttering is learned behavior Stuttering modification • Distortions in speech breathing, • Voluntary stuttering vocal onsets, articulator movement • Advertising stuttering • Fluency can be shaped • Intensive group therapy programs Ronald L. Webster 1935 1945 1965 1975
  • 22. 1935 1945 1965 1975
  • 23. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Speech Motor Control ‣ Measure stuttering ‣ Criteria for successful therapy ‣ Causes of stuttering ‣ Naturalness of speech after treatment ‣ Relationship between stuttering and language development Theory • Disorder of speech motor control • Stuttering cannot be cured • Stuttering is a problem of control • Stuttering begins as language develops Nijmegen 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985
  • 24. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Speech Motor Control Fluency shaping techniques ‣ Measure stuttering • Breathing exercises ‣ Criteria for successful therapy • Gentle onsets ‣ Causes of stuttering • Light articulatory contacts ‣ Naturalness of speech after treatment • Constant monitoring ‣ Relationship between stuttering and • Rate control language development Theory • Disorder of speech motor control • Stuttering cannot be cured • Stuttering is a problem of control • Stuttering begins as language develops Nijmegen 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985
  • 25. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Speech Motor Control Fluency shaping techniques ‣ Measure stuttering • Breathing exercises ‣ Criteria for successful therapy • Gentle onsets ‣ Causes of stuttering • Light articulatory contacts ‣ Naturalness of speech after treatment • Constant monitoring ‣ Relationship between stuttering and • Rate control language development Theory • Psychological approaches • Disorder of speech motor control • Stuttering cannot be cured • Stuttering is a problem of control • Stuttering begins as language develops Nijmegen 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985
  • 26. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Speech Motor Control Fluency shaping techniques ‣ Measure stuttering • Breathing exercises ‣ Criteria for successful therapy • Gentle onsets ‣ Causes of stuttering • Light articulatory contacts ‣ Naturalness of speech after treatment • Constant monitoring ‣ Relationship between stuttering and • Rate control language development Theory • Psychological approaches • Disorder of speech motor control Stuttering modification • Stuttering cannot be cured • Voluntary stuttering • Stuttering is a problem of control • Advertising stuttering • Stuttering begins as language develops Nijmegen 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985
  • 27. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Speech Motor Control Fluency shaping techniques ‣ Measure stuttering • Breathing exercises ‣ Criteria for successful therapy • Gentle onsets ‣ Causes of stuttering • Light articulatory contacts ‣ Naturalness of speech after treatment • Constant monitoring ‣ Relationship between stuttering and • Rate control language development Theory • Psychological approaches • Disorder of speech motor control Stuttering modification • Stuttering cannot be cured • Voluntary stuttering • Stuttering is a problem of control • Advertising stuttering • Stuttering begins as language develops • Self-help movement developed Nijmegen 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985
  • 28. 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985
  • 29. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Brain Imaging Research ‣ Genetic research ‣ Coordination of speech processes ‣ Comparison of stuttering to normal models of speech production Theory • Differences of brain function related to stuttering • Motor control and neurological processing interact • Dynamic multifactorial model emerges Peter Fox 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995
  • 30. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Brain Imaging Research • Interaction between affect, behavior ‣ Genetic research and cognition ‣ Coordination of speech processes ‣ Comparison of stuttering to normal models of speech production Theory • Differences of brain function related to stuttering • Motor control and neurological processing interact • Dynamic multifactorial model emerges Peter Fox 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995
  • 31. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Brain Imaging Research • Interaction between affect, behavior ‣ Genetic research and cognition ‣ Coordination of speech processes ‣ Comparison of stuttering to normal • Modification of stuttering models of speech production • Desensitization • Voluntary Stuttering Theory • Pausing • Differences of brain function related to stuttering • Motor control and neurological processing interact • Dynamic multifactorial model emerges Peter Fox 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995
  • 32. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Brain Imaging Research • Interaction between affect, behavior ‣ Genetic research and cognition ‣ Coordination of speech processes ‣ Comparison of stuttering to normal • Modification of stuttering models of speech production • Desensitization • Voluntary Stuttering Theory • Pausing • Differences of brain function related to • Tolerance to disfluency stuttering • Enhance self-esteem • Motor control and neurological processing interact • Dynamic multifactorial model emerges Peter Fox 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995
  • 33. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Brain Imaging Research • Interaction between affect, behavior ‣ Genetic research and cognition ‣ Coordination of speech processes ‣ Comparison of stuttering to normal • Modification of stuttering models of speech production • Desensitization • Voluntary Stuttering Theory • Pausing • Differences of brain function related to • Tolerance to disfluency stuttering • Enhance self-esteem • Motor control and neurological processing interact • Fluency controls • Dynamic multifactorial model emerges • Slow smooth speech • Continuous phonation Peter Fox 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995
  • 34. 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995
  • 35. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Brain Research ‣ Genetic Research ‣ Pharmacology ‣ Auditory feedback Theory • Unclear genetic factor • Differences in brain function and possibly structure between people who do and do not stutter • Relates to a dynamic system involving elements of speech and language production, emotional reactivity and learning Ed Conture 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995 Today
  • 36. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Brain Research • Integration of stuttering ‣ Genetic Research modification and fluency shaping ‣ Pharmacology with affective component ‣ Auditory feedback Theory • Unclear genetic factor • Differences in brain function and possibly structure between people who do and do not stutter • Relates to a dynamic system involving elements of speech and language production, emotional reactivity and learning Ed Conture 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995 Today
  • 37. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Brain Research • Integration of stuttering ‣ Genetic Research modification and fluency shaping ‣ Pharmacology with affective component ‣ Auditory feedback Theory • Unclear genetic factor • Positive reinforcement for fluency • Differences in brain function and in young children (Lidcombe) possibly structure between people who do and do not stutter • Relates to a dynamic system involving elements of speech and language production, emotional reactivity and learning Ed Conture 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995 Today
  • 38. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Brain Research • Integration of stuttering ‣ Genetic Research modification and fluency shaping ‣ Pharmacology with affective component ‣ Auditory feedback Theory • Unclear genetic factor • Positive reinforcement for fluency • Differences in brain function and in young children (Lidcombe) possibly structure between people who do and do not stutter • Relates to a dynamic system • Auditory feedback devices involving elements of speech and language production, emotional reactivity and learning Ed Conture 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995 Today
  • 39. RESEARCH TREATMENT ‣ Brain Research • Integration of stuttering ‣ Genetic Research modification and fluency shaping ‣ Pharmacology with affective component ‣ Auditory feedback Theory • Unclear genetic factor • Positive reinforcement for fluency • Differences in brain function and in young children (Lidcombe) possibly structure between people who do and do not stutter • Relates to a dynamic system • Auditory feedback devices involving elements of speech and language production, emotional • Pharmaceuticals (Pagaclone) reactivity and learning Ed Conture 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995 Today
  • 40. 1900 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995 Today
  • 41. Instead of looking at the trees We need to look at the BIG PICTURE 1900 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995 Today
  • 42. 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995 Today
  • 43. ecosystem 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995 Today
  • 44. DYNAMIC STUTTERING THERAPY 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995 Today
  • 45. DYNAMIC STUTTERING THERAPY Ideas imagination habits experience perspective Language Articulation emotions intentions self-talk beliefs genetics behavior Feedback Phonation Barbara Dahm 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995 Today
  • 46. DYNAMIC STUTTERING THERAPY Ideas Theory imagination habits perspective • Stuttering is one symptom of a Language experience Articulation malfunctioning integrated system that emotions self-talk intentions includes elements of speech-language beliefs genetics planning and production. • Reflects brain processing behavior • Over-control of an automatic system Feedback Phonation Barbara Dahm 1935 1945 1965 1975 1985 1995 Today
  • 47. CHANGING THE SYSTEM Ideas imagination habits experience perspective Language Articulation emotions intentions self-talk beliefs genetics behavior Feedback Phonation Before Therapy During Therapy After Therapy Long After Therapy
  • 48. CHANGING THE SYSTEM Developing new brain map for speaking Developing a mind that supports change and development Before Therapy During Therapy After Therapy Long After Therapy
  • 49. GOALS FOR CHANGING THE SYSTEM Before Therapy During Therapy After Therapy Long After Therapy
  • 50. GOALS FOR CHANGING THE SYSTEM developing ideas • To focus on the preverbal message Before Therapy During Therapy After Therapy Long After Therapy
  • 51. GOALS FOR CHANGING THE SYSTEM developing ideas • To focus on the preverbal message language formulation • To formulate internal speech automatically as a developing sequence of sounds (syllables) Before Therapy During Therapy After Therapy Long After Therapy
  • 52. GOALS FOR CHANGING THE SYSTEM developing ideas • To focus on the preverbal message language formulation • To formulate internal speech automatically as a developing sequence of sounds (syllables) phonation • To generate a natural voice that supports intonation as an automatic reflection of internal speech Before Therapy During Therapy After Therapy Long After Therapy
  • 53. GOALS FOR CHANGING THE SYSTEM developing ideas • To focus on the preverbal message language formulation • To formulate internal speech automatically as a developing sequence of sounds (syllables) phonation • To generate a natural voice that supports intonation as an automatic reflection of internal speech articulation • To allow the articulators to function automatically and without awareness as a reflection of the phonetic plan Before Therapy During Therapy After Therapy Long After Therapy
  • 54. GOALS FOR CHANGING THE SYSTEM developing ideas • To focus on the preverbal message language formulation • To formulate internal speech automatically as a developing sequence of sounds (syllables) phonation • To generate a natural voice that supports intonation as an automatic reflection of internal speech articulation • To allow the articulators to function automatically and without awareness as a reflection of the phonetic plan monitoring • To allow sub-conscious monitoring - without (listening) to speech fluency or how the speech sounds Before Therapy During Therapy After Therapy Long After Therapy
  • 55. DYNAMIC STUTTERING THERAPY CLIENTS Before Therapy During Therapy After Therapy Long After Therapy
  • 56. DYNAMIC STUTTERING THERAPY CLIENTS Before Therapy During Therapy After Therapy Long After Therapy