Make half your_plate_fruits_and_vegetables-1
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Make half your_plate_fruits_and_vegetables-1 Make half your_plate_fruits_and_vegetables-1 Presentation Transcript

  • Make Half Your Plate Fruits and Vegetables! Presenter name and affiliation
  • What Does It Mean? Make Half Your Plate Fruits and Vegetables! a. Eat any fruit or vegetable as long as it fits on half your plate. b. Choose nutrient-rich fruits and vegetables to fill up about half your plate. c. Both a and b 2
  • What Does It Mean? Make Half Your Plate Fruits and Vegetables! a. Eat any fruit or vegetable as long as it fits on half your plate. b. Choose nutrient-rich fruits and vegetables to fill up about half your plate. c. Both a and b 3
  • Health Benefits • Reduced risk of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease • Protection against some cancers • Lower blood pressure • Reduced risk of kidney stones • Decrease in bone loss 4
  • Match Nutrients - Food Sources! • • • • • Fiber Folate Potassium Beta-carotene Vitamin C • • • • • • Oranges Leafy greens Legumes Papayas Tomatoes White potatoes 5
  • Match Nutrients - Food Sources! • • • • • Fiber Folate Potassium Beta-carotene Vitamin C • • • • • • Oranges Leafy greens Legumes Papayas Tomatoes White potatoes These are excellent food sources of these nutrients. You can get these nutrients from MANY fruits and vegetables! 6
  • Selecting Nutrient-Rich F/V Think COLORS!! RED GREEN PURPLE ORANGE 7
  • Selecting Nutrient-Rich F/V Think VARIETY!! FRESH CRUNCHY SOFT CANNED FROZEN For illustrative purposes only; Extension does not endorse specific brands. 8
  • Maximize Nutrients: Buying • Buy fruits and vegetables fresh and in season when possible. • Choose fresh fruits or canned fruits with little or no added sugar. • When buying frozen vegetables, select those with no added sauces. • Look for low sodium or sodium-free when buying canned vegetables. • Use food labels to compare nutrient values. 9
  • Maximize Nutrients: Preparing • Use fresh fruits and vegetables as soon as possible. • Cook veggies in small amount of liquid until just tender. • Microwave, steam, stir-fry, or lightly grill veggies to retain nutrients. • Use herbs, spices, lemon or lime juice for flavor. • Minimize sauces and added salt. 10
  • Increase the Appeal • • • • Serve fresh cut veggies with a light dip or dressing. Cut veggies in various shapes for added interest. Keep a bowl of fresh fruit on the kitchen counter. In salads use many colors and textures of fruits and vegetables for variety. • Keep prepared cut-up vegetables in a see-through container in the refrigerator. 11
  • Get Children Involved • Let them decide which vegetable to have for dinner. • In the store, ask them to choose a new vegetable or fruit to try at home. • Allow them to help with food preparation. Examples: – – – – Prepare fruit kabobs for a snack. Help with salad preparation. Cut-up vegetables for a recipe. Make a fruit salad for dessert. 12
  • What’s for Dinner? Using MyPlate in Your Life - Adults • Find your estimated daily calorie needs. • Look up the amounts to eat from the Fruits and Vegetables food groups. • Divide these amounts by three. • Pick fruit and vegetable portions that meet these dinner goals. • Decide on food preparation techniques to keep foods as healthful as possible. 13
  • What about Mixed Foods? • We often include foods from more than one food group in our recipes. • Recommended amounts from four of the food groups for a 2,000 calorie diet divided by 3: – – – – Vegetables: 1 cup (rounded up) Fruits: 2/3 cup Grains: 2 ounce equivalents Protein Foods: 2 ounce equivalents (rounded up) • We may make adjustments in these amounts for the dinner meal based on our usual eating patterns. 14
  • MyPlate – Dinner 1 3 ounces broiled salmon (added 1 oz) 1 cup rice pilaf with ½ cup vegetables 1 cup salad 1 peach 15
  • Dinner 1 - Nutrients • • • • • • • • 580 calories 30 grams protein 69 grams carbohydrate 6 grams dietary fiber 20 grams fat 2750 IU vitamin A 8 mg vitamin C 260 mg sodium NOTE: Dairy is not included in this analysis. 16
  • MyPlate – Dinner 2 Spaghetti and meat balls: 1 cup spaghetti 3 ounces meatballs (added 1 oz) 1½ cup salad (added ½ cup) ⅔ cup fruit salad 17
  • Dinner 2 - Nutrients • • • • • • • • 500 calories 23 grams protein 66 grams carbohydrate 10 grams dietary fiber 19 grams fat 1670 IU vitamin A 22 mg vitamin C 350 mg sodium NOTE: Dairy is not included in this analysis. 18
  • Setting Goals Write down at least two things that you will do differently this week to make half your plate fruits and vegetables. 19
  • Questions? Are there any questions? 20
  • Slide set developed by: Linda B. Bobroff, Ph.D., RD Professor and Extension Nutrition Specialist Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences University of Florida September 2011 21