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Class Project for DETT611 at UMUC

Class Project for DETT611 at UMUC

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  • 1. Defining the Need for InformationFirstSteps for Initiating a Research EffortUsing ACRL Standards, Performance Indicators, and Outcomes
    Stuart Adams
    DETT 611
    August 18, 2011
    Information Literacy Module
  • 2. First Steps for Initiating a Research EffortIntroduction & Overview
    Information Literacy skills are for life as well as for academics
    Scholarly Research is a more formal approach to building knowledge
    ALA /ACRL has established Information Literacy Standards
    This tutorial will focus on one standard and apply it to actual practice (Standard 1, Performance Indicator 1)
    Information Literacy is ““the set of skills needed to find, retrieve, analyze, and use information.” - ACRL
  • 3. First Steps for Initiating a Research Effort Scholarship, Research and Inquiry
    Scholarship Builds Knowledge on Knowledge
    “Fundamentally, scholarship is about learning, describing, and explaining what one has learned and how one has learned it” - Dr. Paul Courant
    • Research Is the Intellectual “Conversation” with Scholars & Experts – Past & Present
    Aristotle Says: Locke Says: Jefferson Says: So, I Say:
  • 4. First Steps for Initiating a Research Effort Scholarship, Research and Inquiry
    • Research Is Inquiry: Good Research Starts with a Good Question
  • The Steps for Initiating Research
    Understand Research Goals
    Develop Background Information and Understandings
    Select a Research Topic
    Translate Research Topic Into Research Problem
    Perform Preliminary Research; Identify Initial Keywords
    Refine Research Problem, based on Preliminary Research
    Formulate Research Question
  • 5. First Steps for Initiating a Research Effort Step 1: Understand Your Research Goals
    What is My Purpose?
    What is the Class Assignment?
    What Rubric is Being Applied?
    What Results Have Been Negotiated?
    What Do I Want to Know
    Who Is My Audience ?
    Instructor
    Scholarly Community
    Co-worker, Boss, or Customer/Client
    Self
  • 6. First Steps for Initiating a Research Effort Step 2: Develop Background Information and Understandings
    Review Your Course Materials
    Based on:
    Class Content
    What you already know
    Julia Spranger
  • 7. First Steps for Initiating a Research Effort Step 3: Select a Research Topic
    Topic Source:
    Class Assignment
    Need to Advance the Scholarly Discourse
    Business or Personal Interest
    Could be based on systematic technique for creating a topic
    Battles
    Bull Run
    Vicksburg
    Gettysburg
    Atlanta
    “Mind Map”
    Battles
    Bull Run
    Vicksburg
    Gettysburg
    “Brainstorm” List
    Politics
    Abolitionists
    Republican Party
    Civil War
    Key Persons
    A. Lincoln
    J. Davis
    Gen. Lee
    Slavery
    Bull Run
    Vicksburg
    Gettysburg
  • 8. First Steps for Initiating a Research Effort Step 3: Select a Research Topic
    • Should be of interest to researcher to ensure enthusiastic effort
    • 9. Example: Important Battles of the Civil War
    chucka_nc
    Currier & Ives
  • 10. First Steps for Initiating a Research Effort Step 4: Translate Research Topic Into a Research Problem
    Research Problem = Preliminary Research Question
    Get Started, Don’t Expect Perfection
    Be Creative:
    Example: “What battle was most important to the outcome of the Civil War?”
    A good problem, a researchable and answerable one, is… a result of a reflective act. It results from a dialogical encounter between rationality and creativity.
    – Dr. K. Abdul Gafoor
  • 11. First Steps for Initiating a Research Effort Step 5: Perform Preliminary Research; Identify Initial Keywords
    Keywords:
    Gettysburg,
    R.E. Lee,
    Tactics, Infantry, Cavalry
    Union, Confederate
    Read, Read, Read (and take good notes)
    Begin to Capture a List of Key Words
  • 12. First Steps for Initiating a Research Effort Step 6: Refine Research Problem, Based on Preliminary Research
    Keywords:
    Gettysburg,
    R.E. Lee, G. Meade,
    Seminary Ridge, Culp's Hill Pickett’s Charge
    Tactics, Infantry, Cavalry
    Union, Confederate
    Let the Topic Evolve: Research Is Cyclical
    Get Proper Scope (not too narrow or too broad)
    Too Broad: “Who Won The Civil War and Why?”
    Too Narrow: “Was Stonewall Jackson's Absence at Gettysburg Critical to the Confederate 2nd Corp's Mistakes and the Subsequent Failure of Lee's Tactical Initiative?”
    • Develop an Expanded List of Keywords
  • First Steps for Initiating a Research Effort
    Step 6: Refine Research Problem, Based on Preliminary Research (cont.)
    Civil War
    • Be patient: Keep Asking Questions and Following Leads
    Union Victory (Why?)
    Gettysburg (Important?)
    Battles
    Gen. R.E. Lee
    2nd Day’s Fighting
    Tactical Mistakes?
    Gen. G. G. Meade
    3rd Day’s Fighting
    Did Lee’s Tactical Mistakes on Day 3 Cost the South the Battle of Gettysburg and Perhaps the War?
  • 13. First Steps for Initiating a Research Effort Step 7: Formulate Research Question
    Write Out Research Question in Formal Terms
    Example: Did Lee’s Tactical Mistakes on Day 3 Cost the South the Battle of Gettysburg and Perhaps the War?
    List Keywords
    Example: General Lee, General Meade, Tactics, Infantry, Cavalry, Peach Orchard, Seminary Ridge, Pickett’s Charge, Culp’s Hill, Union, Confederate.
    Currier & Ives
  • 14. First Steps for Initiating a Research Effort Mapping the Steps to the ACRL Standards
  • 15. First Steps for Initiating a Research Effort Conclusions
    Summary:
    Research is a Part of the Ongoing Process of Knowledge Building Which Begins With A Good Question
    Use the 7 Step Process to Set Goals, Pick a Topic, Do Preliminary Research and Refine the Problem into a Research Question
    This Approach is Effective and is Consistent with the ACRL Standards
    You can be a successful researcher if you can get off to a good start
  • 16. References
    ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries). (2004.) Information literacy competency standards for higher education. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards /information literacycompetency.cfm
    Bennett, E. , Berg, S., Brothen, E., Peterson, K. & Veal, R. (2006). Library research handbook. Cappella University. Retrieved 8/12/11 from http://www.capella.edu/interactivemedia/information Literacy/index.aspx
     Courant, P. (2008).   Scholarship: The wave of the future in the digital age. In R. N. Katz [Ed.].   (2008). The tower and the cloud: Higher education in the age of cloud computing. (2008).  Boulder, CO:  EDUCAUSE. Retrieved from http://www.educause.edu/thetowerandthecloud/PUB7202t
    Engle, M. (1996). Library Research at Cornell: A Hypertext Guide. Retrieved 8/12/2011 from http://www.library.cornell.edu/okuref/research/tutorial.html
    Gafoor, K. (2008). How to Arrive at Good Research Questions?. Online Submission, Retrieved from http://eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED507393.pdf
    Hisle, D., Gustavson, A., & Whitehusrt, A. (2010) Research basics 101. Retrieved 8/12/2011 from http://media.lib.ecu.edu/DE/tutorial/ChoosingATopic/topic.html
     Mackey, K. (2008). IRIS 4-2: Information & Research Instruction Suite for Two-Year Colleges. Clark University. Retrieved from http://www.clark.edu/Library/iris/index.shtml
    Moeckel, L. Thomas, P., Williams, P., & Kasowitz-Scheer, A. (2001). The productive researcher; Defining topics and generating keywords. Retrieved 8/12/2011 from http://library.syr.edu/ services/getting_help /instruction/productive_researcher/keywords/index.php
    Shepard, R.(2009). Starting a research project. Document posted in University of Maryland University College VLIB 101 6980 online classroom, archived at: http://webtycho.umuc.edu
     Williamson, F. (2006). Information literacy, A dean's perspective. Retrieved Aug 12, 2011, from Library Research Handbook: Your roadmap to information literacy: http://www.capella.edu/interactivemedia/informationLiteracy/interactive/faculty/faculty_master_outer_wrapper.asp
    Woodward, K. M., & Ganski, K.L. (2011). Information literacy tutorial; Module 1:How do I search. Retrieved 8/12/2011 from http://guides.library.uwm.edu/content.php?pid=121422&sid=1220668