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Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
Students' Voices I research
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Students' Voices I research

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This is a slidecast of the first part of the Students' Voices session at Online Educa Berlin. …

This is a slidecast of the first part of the Students' Voices session at Online Educa Berlin.

Associate Professor Kathryn Moyle, University of Canberra, presents the findings of the first research project of Students' Voices.

In 2008 and 2009, students in primary and secondary schools, in vocational education and training (VET), and students in universities studying to become teachers, contributed to the Students’ Voices I research based upon their current experiences and views. Early career teachers, in their first five years of teaching, were asked to reflect on their experiences as pre-service teachers. Data was collected through online surveys and focus groups.

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  • Can you drop in a logo or something about the organisation that provided you with funding?
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  • Is this the case in The Netherlands?
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  • Transcript

    • 1. Courtesy: www.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk Learning with technologies Students views from Australia and The Netherlands Dr Kathryn Moyle Associate Professor University of Canberra Australia Dr Guus Wijngaards Professor INHolland University The Netherlands
    • 2. Support <ul><li>The Netherlands </li></ul><ul><li>Australia </li></ul>
    • 3. Literature review <ul><li>Research informed by a literature review </li></ul><ul><li>Review of studies published since 2002 </li></ul><ul><li>Students voices: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Schools – primary and secondary students </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vocational education and training (VET) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pre-service teacher education </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>International students </li></ul></ul><ul><li>And early career teachers </li></ul>
    • 4. Who are the learners? <ul><li>Australia </li></ul><ul><li>14,500 pre-schools, primary and secondary schools </li></ul><ul><li>3.3 million full-time school students </li></ul><ul><li>1.7 million students enrolled in a publicly funded VET courses </li></ul><ul><li>397,400 apprentices and trainees </li></ul><ul><li>984,100 FTE students enrolled in higher education courses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>61% of these students aged under 25 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>100,100 in undergraduate and post-graduate education </li></ul></ul><ul><li>111,463 commencing overseas students in higher education </li></ul><ul><ul><li>20.8% of overseas students commencing in the field of education </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Netherlands </li></ul><ul><li>6. 913 Primary schools with 1. 552.548 pupils </li></ul><ul><li>658 Secondary schools with 941.469 pupils </li></ul><ul><li>73 Intermediate Vocational Education schools with 513.257 students </li></ul><ul><li>587.105 students enrolled in higher education courses </li></ul>
    • 5. What the literature showed
    • 6. Access and use <ul><li>Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>92% used a computer either at home or at school </li></ul><ul><ul><li>90% used a computer at school, and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>89% used it at home </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>37% occurred at another person’s house and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>12% reported using a computer in a public library </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Netherlands </li></ul><ul><li>Students ‘work at school quite often with computers’: Primary 49%, Secondary 40%, Vocational 48%. </li></ul><ul><li>  99% used a computer at home </li></ul>
    • 7. Access and use PISA <ul><li>Australia </li></ul><ul><li>Almost all students have access to computers at school and home </li></ul><ul><li>More than 50% of students are accessing home computers on a daily basis, with </li></ul><ul><li>Over 90% have home Internet access </li></ul><ul><li>The Netherlands </li></ul><ul><li>  Almost all students have access to computers at school and home </li></ul><ul><li>Almost 50% of students are accessing home computers on a daily basis, with </li></ul><ul><li>99% have home Internet access </li></ul>400,000 students in 57 countries - Major focus on scientific literacy ICT survey optional - 356 schools and over 14,000 students
    • 8. Learning environment and ICT skills proficiency <ul><li>Australia and The Netherlands </li></ul><ul><li>Students value the opportunity to use technologies in their classrooms as they enjoy the collaboration with other students </li></ul><ul><li>Students cited a major focus in classrooms on regurgitation of information and little opportunity being provided for them to ‘really use’ technologies to explore, think and learn. </li></ul>
    • 9. Cognition and student learning <ul><li>Deep learning through engagement, and student-centred approaches </li></ul><ul><li>Little Australian research </li></ul><ul><li>Aspirational rather than evidence </li></ul><ul><li>Generally students indicated that their educational institutions focused on surface learning and technical aspects of technologies </li></ul>
    • 10. Cognition and student learning <ul><li>Students indicated their preference for </li></ul><ul><li>active learning and that the inclusion of technologies in their learning provided opportunities for students to have more control over their learning; </li></ul><ul><li>to collaborate with other students and to use the teacher as a facilitator rather than transmitter of knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Computers provide opportunities for </li></ul><ul><li>hands-on learning through controlling the mouse; using different software applications; </li></ul><ul><li>exploring the Internet through prompts and comprehending what was on the screen; and </li></ul><ul><li>thereby engaging in developing their cognitive skills. </li></ul>
    • 11. Gaps <ul><li>Lack of cross-sectoral research </li></ul><ul><li>Very little recent research </li></ul><ul><li>Quantitative information about access and use </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitative research on issues such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Whether ICT assists students learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Uses of ICT outside of school for learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Roles of emerging technologies in learning </li></ul></ul>
    • 12. Data collection <ul><li>Online surveys + Focus groups </li></ul><ul><li>Primary </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary </li></ul><ul><li>Vocational education and training </li></ul><ul><li>Trainee teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Early career teachers </li></ul>
    • 13. Participants PARTICIPANTS SURVEYS FOCUS GROUPS TOTAL AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary 502 230 148 20 650 250 Secondary 152 465 61 34 213 499 VET 70 998 32 18 102 1016 Trainee teachers 235 308 25 8 260 316 Early career teachers 100 117 27 8 127 125 Total responses 1059 2118 293 88 1352 2206
    • 14. Initial findings <ul><li>Access and use of technologies </li></ul><ul><li>Online and computer games </li></ul><ul><li>Social networking </li></ul><ul><li>Learning styles and educational value of technologies </li></ul><ul><li>Support for learning with technologies </li></ul><ul><li>Future expectations </li></ul>
    • 15. Access and use of technologies Majority of students access and use of the Internet from home at least 1-2 weekly – older students, everyday
    • 16. Reasons for using the Internet <ul><li>Australia </li></ul><ul><li>S earching for information (range 91%-100%) </li></ul><ul><li>F inding locations </li></ul><ul><li>(range 59%-94%) </li></ul><ul><li>T alking with friends using Instant Messaging (IM) (range 64%-94%) </li></ul><ul><li>D ownloading music </li></ul><ul><li>(range 42%-86%) </li></ul><ul><li>Contributing to social networking sites </li></ul><ul><li>(range 40%-69%) </li></ul><ul><li>The Netherlands </li></ul><ul><li>Searching for information (range 82% - 100%) </li></ul><ul><li>Finding locations (range 45% - 76%) </li></ul><ul><li>Talking with friends using IM </li></ul><ul><li>(range 73% - 89%) </li></ul><ul><li>Downloading music </li></ul><ul><li>(range 48% - 81%) </li></ul><ul><li>Contributing to social networking sites </li></ul><ul><li>(range 42% - 84%) </li></ul>
    • 17. Functions used on mobile phone % of responses from the respective cohorts Phone calls Text Messaging Games AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary 84 82 70 68 77 73 Secondary 90 98 94 97 50 55 VET 97 99 92 98 17 16 Trainee teachers 97 99 98 97 30 12 Early career 100 100 97 92 25 7
    • 18. Functions used on mobile phone % of responses from the respective cohorts Photos Video Music listening AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary 77 70 60 47 54 64 Secondary 50 86 51 63 60 72 VET 17 63 22 28 20 46 Trainee teachers 30 68 26 29 22 47 Early career 25 58 31 17 24 28
    • 19. Online and computer games <ul><li>All cohorts in both countries reported a level of interest in playing games online and on mobile phones </li></ul><ul><li>School students showed the most interest in playing online games </li></ul><ul><li>Over a third of all respondents indicated they have played an online game with over 95% of school students indicating they have played an online game </li></ul><ul><li>A majority of school students indicated that playing computer games assists them to learn how to solve problems </li></ul><ul><li>Fine motor skills (learning to be quick with their fingers) was reported by over 40% of all cohorts as a benefit of playing computer games </li></ul><ul><li>Some lack of surety was identified by the adult cohorts about the value of online and computing games for educational purposes </li></ul>
    • 20. Degree of interest <ul><li>Across all cohorts generally, most interest was expressed in strategy games. Action and strategy games were reported as being of most interest to primary and secondary students </li></ul>Degree of interest % Interested & Very Interested Action games Sport Games Driving games AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary 76 64 72 78 69 72 Secondary 60 59 44 49 59 47 VET 30 49 24 32 30 41 Trainee teachers 23 15 19 19 24 19 Early career 34 7 25 17 28 12
    • 21. Degree of interest <ul><li>Across all cohorts generally, most interest was expressed in strategy games. Action and strategy games were reported as being of most interest to primary and secondary students </li></ul>Degree of interest % Interested & Very Interested Role Play games Strategy games Flight simulators AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary 44 22 67 39 52 29 Secondary 46 54 55 41 32 20 VET 30 25 42 37 21 14 Trainee teachers 28 9 50 20 13 5 Early career 36 10 52 14 25 7
    • 22. What’s learnt? By playing computer games I learn to … % responses Strongly agree or agree Make Decisions Concentrate better Work with others AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary 57 27 49 30 46 30 Secondary 44 40 38 35 35 43 VET 20 21 28 20 18 21 Trainee teachers 35 23 26 23 21 23 Early career 37 21 32 21 28 23
    • 23. What’s learnt? By playing computer games I learn to … % responses Strongly agree or agree Solve problems Get on with people B e quick with my fingers AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary 54 20 41 26 72 48 Secondary 54 32 30 34 63 56 VET 26 21 16 15 41 31 Trainee teachers 39 24 16 22 40 23 Early career 39 25 23 19 48 31
    • 24. Should computing games be used for learning? % responses Strongly agree or agree Education and training institutions should use more computing games for students’ learning Australia The Netherlands Primary 49 36 Secondary 58 61 VET 28 23 Trainee teachers 45 19 Early career 40 21
    • 25. Social networking <ul><li>All cohorts indicated interest in sites such as You Tube and Flickr </li></ul><ul><li>A majority of primary and secondary students responded they use MSN for learning purposes </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-service and early career teachers indicated they had used Facebook to support their learning </li></ul><ul><li>There were differing views expressed by the respective participant cohorts about the value of social networking and online media sites for students’ learning </li></ul>
    • 26. Social sites for school or not ? Australia & The Netherlands Sites like YouTube and Flickr are for fun- not for learning
    • 27. Social sites for school or not ? Australia & The Netherlands Sites like YouTube and Flickr are for home - not for school/training/university
    • 28. Social sites for school or not ? Australia & The Netherlands Sites like Hyves and instant messaging are for fun - not for learning.
    • 29. Social sites for school or not ? Australia & The Netherlands Sites like Hyves and instant messaging are for home - not for school/training /university
    • 30. Learning styles and educational value of technologies <ul><li>All cohorts in both countries indicated </li></ul><ul><li>they prefer to learn using a variety of styles that are appropriate for the outcomes required </li></ul><ul><li>they like learning that includes technologies </li></ul><ul><li>‘ learning with technologies’ is one form of ‘hands-on-learning’ </li></ul><ul><li>their learning experiences include working in groups, solving problems and using technologies </li></ul>
    • 31. Learning styles and educational value of technologies <ul><li>Students’ learning experiences includes a lot of the time listening to teachers provide information </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Good’ teachers were seen to be those who have strong interpersonal skills with their students </li></ul>
    • 32. Experiences of different teaching & learning styles % Strongly agree/agree Most of the time we have lessons where the teachers give information & students sit & listen Work a lot with computers Work in small groups AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary 59 69 59 49 52 59 Secondary 63 61 48 40 52 60 VET 45 62 82 48 69 69 Trainee teachers 82 63 47 31 72 63
    • 33. Experiences of different teaching & learning styles % Strongly agree/agree Do problem solving for learning Feel views are taken seriously by teachers /lecturers Feel it is important to have a say about what is being studied AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary 60 58 50 75 65 49 Secondary 59 53 56 63 67 65 VET 82 79 73 66 87 70 Trainee teachers 73 66 62 54 85 67
    • 34. Educational value of technologies <ul><li>Rests in the assistance technologies provide to undertake both </li></ul><ul><li>higher order or more complex activities (eg solving problems and analyzing information), as well as </li></ul><ul><li>lower order activities (eg presentation of assignments and practicing skills). </li></ul>
    • 35. Use of computers and the Internet to present work in a neat and tidy manner
    • 36. Use computers and the Internet to practice skills
    • 37. Ways in which students use technologies I use the computer & Internet to … % responses Agree most or all of time Make concept maps of ideas Reflect on things learnt Plan study Be creative AU NL AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary 14 30 24 34 25 22 42 65 Secondary 17 53 25 49 32 35 44 78 VET 25 25 47 20 48 45 52 38 Trainee teachers 25 31 39 37 46 57 62 35 Early career 45 34 45 40 75 74 69 42
    • 38. Ways in which students use technologies I use the computer & Internet to … % responses Agree most or all of time Communicate with teacher/ lecturer outside of class Communicate with other students outside class Work with other students on an activity For specifically designed tasks AU NL AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary 9 16 42 49 22 45 21 30 Secondary 22 35 59 84 31 70 25 70 VET 50 44 50 60 46 56 59 31 Trainee teachers 64 57 60 70 45 64 42 29 Early career 72 60 34 14 59 31 64 26
    • 39. Support for learning with technologies % responses Agree most or all of time There are enough people to assist me with technical issues at school/training/ university My teacher/lecturer is able to support my learning with computers and the Internet AU NL AU NL Primary 63 50 57 46 Secondary 73 59 51 37 VET 59 61 64 39 Trainee teachers 58 93 28 68 Early career 57 77 36 56
    • 40. Support for learning with technologies % responses Agree most or all of time My teachers'/lecturers skills with technologies are good My teachers' /lecturers’ technical skills could be improved AU NL AU NL Primary 54 55 28 17 Secondary 54 40 44 30 VET 63 40 22 41 Trainee teachers 33 69 50 83 Early career 30 59 45 86
    • 41. Future expectations In the next year I expect I will … % Yes response Email a teacher Email another student about my studies Create a presentation Use interactive whiteboard AU NL AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary 32 14 66 49 68 53 65 49 Secondary 72 41 82 70 86 50 56 38 VET 44 - 82 19 68 71 45 39 Trainee teachers 73 12 39 49 88 60 67 64 Early career 91 19 63 63 91 64 66 61
    • 42. Future expectations In the next year I expect I will … % Yes response Use a digital camera for studies Access a podcast for studies Take part in online class Text message other students about studies AU NL AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary 56 17 27 9 19 7 38 22 Secondary 69 44 44 30 20 22 58 55 VET 51 43 32 8 66 50 54 70 Trainee teachers 80 85 59 7 75 58 67 49 Early career 90 82 62 8 77 63 73 43
    • 43. In the next year I expect to… % responses most or all of time Take an online test Be part of chatroom discussion about my studies Contribute to a wiki AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary 48 22 43 50 22 10 Secondary 61 21 56 34 24 26 VET 41 30 51 17 38 9 Trainee teachers 29 17 69 25 16 5 Early career 48 18 51 21 37 11
    • 44. In the next year I expect to… % responses most or all of tim e Check grades online Check study requirements online Access an expert online Use social networking sites AU NL AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary 29 19 38 19 21 17 36 44 Secondary 29 62 52 57 21 14 61 66 VET 76 81 79 79 54 28 31 44 Trainee teachers 43 43 32 16 48 20 41 33 Early career 63 66 52 19 57 19 49 18
    • 45. Support for learning with technologies <ul><li>All cohorts in both countries indicated they feel </li></ul><ul><ul><li>they are safe online within their education institution and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>their private online information is safe at the education institution </li></ul></ul><ul><li>No cohorts indicated major concerns about online bullying or the receipt of unwanted emails at their education institution </li></ul><ul><li>About third of participants in all cohorts consider the Internet speed at their education or training institution is not fast enough </li></ul><ul><li>While about half the adult students indicated they are able to receive assistance from their lecturers outside of class via the Internet, less than 20% of the school students indicated this to be the case. </li></ul>
    • 46. Qualities of good educators <ul><li>Importance of educators to be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>form constructive relationships with their students </li></ul><ul><li>give simple explanations </li></ul><ul><li>structure relevant learning experiences for the outcomes to be achieved </li></ul><ul><li>use learning styles appropriate to both the content and the learners </li></ul><ul><li>ensure different learning styles are met </li></ul><ul><li>support students to learn the answers for themselves </li></ul><ul><li>encourage activities that include technologies both for learning and assessment. </li></ul>
    • 47. Challenges <ul><li>Educators across all sectors with good skills in teaching and learning with technologies </li></ul><ul><li>Wide variations in students’ experiences of the quality and speed of access to technologies within education and training institutions across Australia and The Netherlands </li></ul>
    • 48. Challenges <ul><li>Variations across jurisdictions and sectors of 24x7 access by students to their respective education or training institution’s intranet to be able to access lectures; assessment tasks; course materials; the library and so on </li></ul><ul><li>How to increase students’ engagement and achievements where their learning includes technologies (eg half of the adult respondents agreed that improving lecturers’ knowledge of online games would improve students’ learning). </li></ul>
    • 49. Professional learning <ul><li>School leadership strategies to foster ongoing teachers’ learning and development about teaching and learning with technologies </li></ul><ul><li>Development of teacher educators’ about ways in which technologies can be meaningfully included in their programs and courses </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers development of how technologies can be used to improve the quality of their teaching and learning </li></ul>
    • 50. Implications <ul><li>School leaders </li></ul><ul><li>Build a culture of collegial learning to support all teachers in improving their technology skills and confidence, including relevant application of technologies to support student learning and cater for individual requirements; and </li></ul><ul><li>Critically examine appropriate and effective technologies to meet local demands and increase access and maintenance support as relevant to the context. </li></ul>
    • 51. Questions?
    • 52. Reports <ul><li>Australian report available from: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.deewr.gov.au/Schooling/DigitalEducationRevolution/Resources/Pages/Resources.aspx </li></ul><ul><li>The Netherlands report available from: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.inholland.nl/elearning </li></ul>

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