Kathryn Moyle

Guus Wijngaards
Paving the way to the future
       Learning from the web:
     experiences of our students


 Dr Kathryn Moyle
    Associ...
Purpose of session

      o To discuss future online
environments appropriate for teaching
             and learning

o To...
Web 2.0 Definition
Online application that uses the World
Wide Web (www) as a platform and allows
for participatory involv...
Growing every day

Software platform
 Radically user-
    oriented

  Decentralised

  Collective and
    massive
Personal Learning Environment


 A collection of technologies that
 enable existing online content to
 be reorganized, re-...
Personal Learning Environments

  Support social, educational,
  professional and other online
  activities to be undertak...
A PLE is
comprised of all
   the different
 tools we use in
  our everyday
life for learning.

 Many of these
  tools will...
Web 2.0
applications
 seem to be
   of vital
importance.
Learning styles and educational
     value of technologies

All cohorts in both countries indicated

o they prefer to lear...
Time-to-Adoption
One Year or Less
      Collaborative Environments
      Online Communication Tools

Time-to-Adoption
Two ...
Could social software be powerful
as a model for educational change?
Main
theme




                                                  Courtesy: PhotoDisc
 Listen carefully to the learners whe...
Why?




                                              Courtesy: Fotolia.com
The input of young people provides valuable
 ...
Why?




                                               Courtesy: Fotolia.com
          Courtesy: Fahrschule Seidensticker...
So, ensure that
young people play a
 part in designing
   their learning
      process
Why?




                                       Courtesy:Wordpress
       .....reflective learners.....
Taking
                                          young
                                          people
                  ...
Taking
                                                                      young
                                       ...
Shared
                                                                               conduct
Courtesy: Maastrichtuniversi...
Shared
                                        conduct




                   .....implies:

realising connections between...
LEARNER ENGAGEMENT

A review of learner voice initiatives across
the UK’s education sectors


Leila Walker, Senior Researc...
Example 1
      Bringing staff and learners together

The University of Birmingham brings staff and
learners together as p...
Example 2
Peer support is a crucial step in empowering
                  learners.

Research has shown that peer assessmen...
Example 3
  Mediating at playtimes in primary school

Year 5 and 6 pupils at Denton West End Primary
School help to settle...
Research
• Australia and The Netherlands
  (University of Canberra and INHolland University)
• USA (CoSN, Project Tomorrow...
Findings from research in
Australia and The Netherlands
Access and use of technologies
                    Primary        Secondary    VET   Pre-service
120



100



 80



 60
...
Reasons for using the Internet
Australia                    The Netherlands

•   Searching for            Searching for in...
Social networking

• All cohorts indicated interest in sites
  such as You Tube and Flickr
• A majority of primary and sec...
Social sites for school or not?
               Australia & The Netherlands
Sites like YouTube and Flickr are for fun- not ...
Learning styles and educational
     value of technologies
All cohorts in both countries indicated
• they prefer to learn ...
But … there are challenges

Variations in students’ experiences

• Some educators across all sectors with
  good skills in...
Experiences of different
            teaching & learning styles

    %       Most of the time    Work a lot with   Work in...
Support for learning with technologies


     %            There are enough people My teacher/lecturer is able
 responses ...
Support for learning with technologies

     %            My teachers'/lecturers     My teachers' /lecturers’
 responses  ...
Main research question?



Courtesy: Friese Poort




                     Which characteristics in successful
           ...
Characteristics of
           a given learning practice?

  Motivation and ownership of all participants involved

       ...
Research methodology?

 Finding examples of successful learning practices

Study of literature in which all information on...
What are pupils’
  and students’
expectations and
experiences with
(social software)
 technologies?
Which problems will we encounter when
 we integrate the social web within our
       ‘closed’ school systems?
Which factors are instrumental in contributing to
         a favourable environment to enhance ‘co-
     creation’ and ‘co...
Studentsvoices.org
Paving the way to the Future of Learning from the Web: Experiences of Our Students
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Paving the way to the Future of Learning from the Web: Experiences of Our Students

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This is the presentation by Guus Wijngaards and Kathryn Moyle held at the COSN 2010 in Washington. Purpose of the session was:
1. to discuss future online environments appropriate for teaching and learning; 2. to inform our discussions by recent ‘student voice’ research; 3. to discuss the concept of the ‘personal web’.

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Paving the way to the Future of Learning from the Web: Experiences of Our Students

  1. 1. Kathryn Moyle Guus Wijngaards
  2. 2. Paving the way to the future Learning from the web: experiences of our students Dr Kathryn Moyle Associate Professor University of Canberra Australia Dr Guus Wijngaards Professor INHolland University The Netherlands
  3. 3. Purpose of session o To discuss future online environments appropriate for teaching and learning o To inform our discussions by recent ‘student voice’ research o To discuss the concept of the ‘personal web’
  4. 4. Web 2.0 Definition Online application that uses the World Wide Web (www) as a platform and allows for participatory involvement, collabora- tion, and interactions among users. Web 2.0 is also characterized by the creation and sharing of intellectual and social resources by end users.
  5. 5. Growing every day Software platform Radically user- oriented Decentralised Collective and massive
  6. 6. Personal Learning Environment A collection of technologies that enable existing online content to be reorganized, re-configured and managed rather than simply being viewed
  7. 7. Personal Learning Environments Support social, educational, professional and other online activities to be undertaken in personalized ways. The ‘personal web’ refers to spaces that are highly flexible and unique to each person.
  8. 8. A PLE is comprised of all the different tools we use in our everyday life for learning. Many of these tools will be based on social Courtesy: http://www.dontwasteyourtime.co.uk/wp- content/uploads/2009/12/DavidHopkins-PLE.jpg software.
  9. 9. Web 2.0 applications seem to be of vital importance.
  10. 10. Learning styles and educational value of technologies All cohorts in both countries indicated o they prefer to learn using a variety of styles that are appropriate for the outcomes required o they like learning that includes technologies o ‘learning with technologies’ is one form of ‘hands-on-learning’ o their learning experiences include working in groups, solving problems and using technologies
  11. 11. Time-to-Adoption One Year or Less Collaborative Environments Online Communication Tools Time-to-Adoption Two to Three Years Mobiles Cloud Computing Time-to-Adoption Four to Five Years Smart Objects The Personal Web
  12. 12. Could social software be powerful as a model for educational change?
  13. 13. Main theme Courtesy: PhotoDisc Listen carefully to the learners when creating learning environments
  14. 14. Why? Courtesy: Fotolia.com The input of young people provides valuable aspects which may lead into educational improvements
  15. 15. Why? Courtesy: Fotolia.com Courtesy: Fahrschule Seidensticker Learners tend to approach their own learning methods in a more effective and motivated way when they are asked to consider their learning practice
  16. 16. So, ensure that young people play a part in designing their learning process
  17. 17. Why? Courtesy:Wordpress .....reflective learners.....
  18. 18. Taking young people seriously Courtesy: hfccschool.net.hk .....implies: that we accept informal learning outside school especially in personal virtual environments
  19. 19. Taking young people seriously Courtesy: blog.nielsen.com .....implies: that young people should share conduct of learning processes at the educational institutions
  20. 20. Shared conduct Courtesy: Maastrichtuniversity.nl .....implies: that students and teachers have a joint responsibility for the contents and processes
  21. 21. Shared conduct .....implies: realising connections between formal (school) and informal (personal, outside school) learning environments
  22. 22. LEARNER ENGAGEMENT A review of learner voice initiatives across the UK’s education sectors Leila Walker, Senior Researcher, Futurelab with Ann Logan, Educational Consultant 2008
  23. 23. Example 1 Bringing staff and learners together The University of Birmingham brings staff and learners together as part of professional development for educators. Staff meet with learners and hear their views first- hand in a safe, non-threatening environment. This helps staff understand learners’ reactions to the process of learning. Using learners’ voices in ‘live’ events ensures that staff are hearing their real views (and not making assumptions).
  24. 24. Example 2 Peer support is a crucial step in empowering learners. Research has shown that peer assessment, for instance, can enhance learning. In one project, Rudduck, Brown and Hendy (2006) found that two Year 9 English classes taught by the same teacher produced very different results. The difference was peer assessment and support. One class used peer assessment and the other did not. At the end of term, the peer assessment group had covered much more of the curriculum than the other group. The teacher said that the peer-assessed group was learning at a much faster pace.
  25. 25. Example 3 Mediating at playtimes in primary school Year 5 and 6 pupils at Denton West End Primary School help to settle disagreements on the school playground. They have received training to be active listeners and to encourage problem solving between pupils. This work is endorsed by the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.
  26. 26. Research • Australia and The Netherlands (University of Canberra and INHolland University) • USA (CoSN, Project Tomorrow) • UK (BECTA, Futurelab, National Union of Students) • 2010 and beyond http://studentsvoices.org
  27. 27. Findings from research in Australia and The Netherlands
  28. 28. Access and use of technologies Primary Secondary VET Pre-service 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 AUS NL AUS NL AUS NL AUS NL AUS NL Everyday 1-2 times a week 1-2 month Not often Never Majority of students access and use of the Internet from home at least 1-2 weekly – older students, everyday
  29. 29. Reasons for using the Internet Australia The Netherlands • Searching for Searching for information information (range (range 82% - 100%) 91%-100%) Finding locations • Finding locations (range 45% - 76%) (range 59%-94%) Talking with friends using • Talking with friends IM using Instant (range 73% - 89%) Messaging (IM) (range Downloading music 64%-94%) (range 48% - 81%) • Downloading music Contributing to social (range 42%-86%) networking sites • Contributing to social (range 42% - 84%) networking sites (range 40%-69%)
  30. 30. Social networking • All cohorts indicated interest in sites such as You Tube and Flickr • A majority of primary and secondary students responded they use MSN for learning purposes • Pre-service and early career teachers indicated they had used Facebook to support their learning • There were differing views expressed by the respective participant cohorts about the value of social networking and online media sites for students’ learning
  31. 31. Social sites for school or not? Australia & The Netherlands Sites like YouTube and Flickr are for fun- not for learning 120 100 80 60 Disagree Agree 40 20 0 AU NL AU NL AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary Secondary VET Trainee teachers Early Career
  32. 32. Learning styles and educational value of technologies All cohorts in both countries indicated • they prefer to learn using a variety of styles that are appropriate for the outcomes required • they like learning that includes technologies • ‘learning with technologies’ is one form of ‘hands-on-learning’ • their learning experiences include working in groups, solving problems and using technologies
  33. 33. But … there are challenges Variations in students’ experiences • Some educators across all sectors with good skills in teaching and learning with technologies • Quality and speed of access to technologies
  34. 34. Experiences of different teaching & learning styles % Most of the time Work a lot with Work in small Strongly we have lessons computers groups agree/agre where the teachers e give information & students sit & listen AU NL AU NL AU NL Primary 59 69 59 49 52 59 Secondary 63 61 48 40 52 60 VET 45 62 82 48 69 69 Trainee 82 63 47 31 72 63 teachers
  35. 35. Support for learning with technologies % There are enough people My teacher/lecturer is able responses to assist me with technical to support my learning issues at school/training/ with computers and the Agree most university Internet or all of time AU NL AU NL Primary 63 50 57 46 Secondary 73 59 51 37 VET 59 61 64 39 Trainee 58 93 28 68 teachers Early career 57 77 36 56
  36. 36. Support for learning with technologies % My teachers'/lecturers My teachers' /lecturers’ responses skills with technologies technical skills could be are good improved Agree most or all of time AU NL AU NL Primary 54 55 28 17 Secondary 54 40 44 30 VET 63 40 22 41 Trainee 33 69 50 83 teachers Early career 30 59 45 86
  37. 37. Main research question? Courtesy: Friese Poort Which characteristics in successful learning practices implementing the Web 2.0 technology may serve as a role model for redesigning learning environments in similar or less similar contexts?
  38. 38. Characteristics of a given learning practice? Motivation and ownership of all participants involved Characteristics of the context Contents of the learning practice Pedagogical strategies Options in media and communications The target Group and other people involved Other conditions Available learning environment contributing to the success
  39. 39. Research methodology? Finding examples of successful learning practices Study of literature in which all information on the examined learning practices will be listed Analysis and evaluation of the examined learning practices Video footage of the learning practice showing the characteristics and major success in vision
  40. 40. What are pupils’ and students’ expectations and experiences with (social software) technologies?
  41. 41. Which problems will we encounter when we integrate the social web within our ‘closed’ school systems?
  42. 42. Which factors are instrumental in contributing to a favourable environment to enhance ‘co- creation’ and ‘co-production’, eventually resulting in a feeling of ‘co-ownership’? Courtesy: Ecole du Magasin
  43. 43. Studentsvoices.org
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