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Quantification of Post-human Development, paper presented at the Proceedings of the 5th Beyond Humanism Conference, The Posthuman: Differences, Embodiments, Performativity 2013
Quantification of Post-human Development, paper presented at the Proceedings of the 5th Beyond Humanism Conference, The Posthuman: Differences, Embodiments, Performativity 2013
Quantification of Post-human Development, paper presented at the Proceedings of the 5th Beyond Humanism Conference, The Posthuman: Differences, Embodiments, Performativity 2013
Quantification of Post-human Development, paper presented at the Proceedings of the 5th Beyond Humanism Conference, The Posthuman: Differences, Embodiments, Performativity 2013
Quantification of Post-human Development, paper presented at the Proceedings of the 5th Beyond Humanism Conference, The Posthuman: Differences, Embodiments, Performativity 2013
Quantification of Post-human Development, paper presented at the Proceedings of the 5th Beyond Humanism Conference, The Posthuman: Differences, Embodiments, Performativity 2013
Quantification of Post-human Development, paper presented at the Proceedings of the 5th Beyond Humanism Conference, The Posthuman: Differences, Embodiments, Performativity 2013
Quantification of Post-human Development, paper presented at the Proceedings of the 5th Beyond Humanism Conference, The Posthuman: Differences, Embodiments, Performativity 2013
Quantification of Post-human Development, paper presented at the Proceedings of the 5th Beyond Humanism Conference, The Posthuman: Differences, Embodiments, Performativity 2013
Quantification of Post-human Development, paper presented at the Proceedings of the 5th Beyond Humanism Conference, The Posthuman: Differences, Embodiments, Performativity 2013
Quantification of Post-human Development, paper presented at the Proceedings of the 5th Beyond Humanism Conference, The Posthuman: Differences, Embodiments, Performativity 2013
Quantification of Post-human Development, paper presented at the Proceedings of the 5th Beyond Humanism Conference, The Posthuman: Differences, Embodiments, Performativity 2013
Quantification of Post-human Development, paper presented at the Proceedings of the 5th Beyond Humanism Conference, The Posthuman: Differences, Embodiments, Performativity 2013
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Quantification of Post-human Development, paper presented at the Proceedings of the 5th Beyond Humanism Conference, The Posthuman: Differences, Embodiments, Performativity 2013

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Quantification of Post-human Development. paper presented at the Proceedings of the 5th Beyond Humanism Conference, The Posthuman: Differences, Embodiments, Performativity 2013 …

Quantification of Post-human Development. paper presented at the Proceedings of the 5th Beyond Humanism Conference, The Posthuman: Differences, Embodiments, Performativity 2013

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http://www.slideshare.net/stuartcalimport/quantification-of-posthuman-development

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  • 1. Beyond Humanism Conference Rome, September 2013 Quantification of Post-Human Development Calimport, S. R. G Introduction The primary aim of this research was to develop a database of categorised variables that could be tracked that would lead towards or away from a state of post-human development – this research would act as a proof-of-principle and stimulus for discussion and more advanced planning, categorization and action. The secondary aim of the research was to utilise current self-tracking tools to start to track multiple personal metrics, particularly metrics that where linked to longevity, wellbeing and cognitive capacity. By recording the health, wellbeing and cognitive metrics and effectors of the researcher carrying out the finding and categorization of variables – this research also aims to explore the possibility of tracking whether the individual, be they a decision maker or stakeholder, categorizing is healthy and well, and to create a dataset where this issue can be further explored. By making abstract and qualitative claims about post-humanism this fundamentally hinders progress to a post-human state and may lead to changes that do not progress us towards a post-human state or particular post-human state of interest. We are already living in an era of big data (Letouze, 2011), digitalisation and self-quantification (Quantified Self, n.d; Health 2.0, n.d.). Website click through rates, gross domestic product, heart rate variability and many other variables are being constantly tracked and analysed by individuals and multiple other entities. The extent to which quantifiable and scientifically objective processes can aid post-human development will be explored.
  • 2. Many metrics we are already tracking could have an effect on our development into a post-human state, but there exists an abundance of metrics we are not yet analysing that could also be of use for quantifying post- human development. If we are aiming to attain a post-human state – quantification of and by citizens, decision makers and stakeholders is essential as is the identification of actions to take, areas to address and objective milestones that can be reached. There are two key issues revolving around underutilisation of current metrics: Firstly, the fraction of private and publicly funded research that analyses current data for how it might lead to post-human state is miniscule. Although, there are a few researchers using current data to address topics related to post-humanism such as increases in longevity (Mathers et al, 2001), decreases in violence (World Report on Violence and Health, 2002; Google Ideas, n.d.), and whether artificial intelligence can recognize humans (Chellappa et al, 2010). The potential for using the data that is already being generated to quantify post-human development is enormous, and growing bigger every minute of every day as more data, meta-data and more diverse data types become available. The second issue regarding the underutilization of current metrics is that there are few researchers, businesses and institutes that are explicitly stating that they are aiming to measure and create a post- human world. There is currently a lack of statement of values, and a lack of transparency and dialogue on this subject. Typical goals of researchers, venture capitalists, politicians, businesses and institutes might include short to medium term goals that may or may not be aligned with post-human development – such as curing a type of cancer, creating an artificial heart, reducing violence, increasing innovation and entrepreneurship and improving education and healthcare. Other individuals, decision makers and stakeholders may not even state their long-term goals, or measure them openly. The case needs to be made that the self-tracking and institution-based tracking of individuals, decision makers and
  • 3. stakeholders if done correctly, could enhance our ability to perform, set goals, meet milestones and do so in a manner that is not invasive, imbalanced or unethical – but serves to assist and empower individuals to make better decisions and take better action personally and also for and with others. Quantification, implemented ethically, may also allow for greater understanding of others so that interventions and assistance can be given. Transparency, mutual understanding, education and mutual goal finding and setting are key to a post-human future. The declaring of long-term post-human goals and values would transform society and inform day-to-day actions and decision-making. It would also allow us to specifically address social, legal, political and educational issues and engage with those demographics that did not know whether they wanted a post-human future or not, and unreached demographics that do not know what a post-human future means. Statistics on these demographics would also be important for polling, quantification, tracking and optimisation purposes. Next - We need to address the following questions - What should we be quantifying now, that we are not already quantifying? And what novel things do we need to be doing and quantifying? Current trends and emerging fields can aid us in answering these questions and play a role by providing case studies and assist in the creation of an interdisciplinary science of post-human development. The Quantified Self – Quantified Self is a community of citizen scientists and self-trackers as well as collection of methods, tools and devices that utilise personalised analytics. The Quantified Self concept shows promise for performing experiments that lead to a post-human state. In addition, self- tracking methods allow for states and qualities previously and widely considered qualitative to be quantified. States such as emotional states, elegance of form, brain states, interpersonal interaction and lifespan
  • 4. predictors, for some parameters, can be measured quantitatively through posture cue devices, electrocardiogram devices, social media tools and biometric sensors (Quantified Self Guide To Self Tracking, n.d.). Through self- tracking and biofeedback the individual can track, monitor and modify their thoughts, behaviour, lifestyle and environment in order to assist the development of post-human states. Self-tracking also includes sharing knowledge on how to develop into a post-human and The Quantified Self community offers a select of lead users as case studies and consultants for post-human for development. Big Data – Big Data and data science are the terms for handling and analysing large complex datasets. Big data is being handled primarily for business, investment and marketing uses as well for crisis response such as terrorism and natural disasters (Letouze, 2011; Google Ideas, n.d., NSA/CSS Strategy, n.d.) as well as the physical and social sciences. In its current state Big Data and Big Data analytics is being under-utilised as it could be being used specifically to analyse post-human development and factors that could dramatically increase lifespan Other fields that could be tracked and combined into the interdisciplinary field of post-human development include - cosmetic surgery, implant surgery, regenerative medicine (Jungebluth et al., 2012), personalised medicine, preventative surgery, exosuit design, brain-computer interfacing, cryopreservation, cryostasis and hibernation (Zancanaro e al., 2004), user experience design, interface design, next-generation human habit prototyping (Seasteading Institute, n.d, The Venus Project, n.d.) data warehousing and brain banking (MRC Brain Banking - science, n.d.). Big data, self- quantification and machine learning would be at the top of the hierarchy, analysing post-human development and informing research and decision- making. Methods
  • 5. Variable/metric finding Variable and metric finding was performed via reading, travelling, networking, researching and exposing oneself to many types of experiences, situations and ideas. Variable/metric logging When a variable or metric was found that was predicted to have an impact on post-human development and lifespan – it was logged in a database. Health, wellbeing, fitness, cognition, nutrition, stress and longevity metrics were also recorded simultaneously with variable logging (Calimport. S.R.G., 2013a). Variable/metric categorising Variables were categorised by whether they were predicted to positively or negatively affect post-human development and longevity. Longitudinal Study The study was longitudinal and biometrics as well as variables to optimise for post-human development were logged either continuously or at multiple time points over the 2 year span of the project. Open Science Commons The variables and metrics recorded are available as an open science commons (Calimport, S.R.G., 2013b) as the dataset is a proof-of-principle dataset that is intended to stimulate thinking and action for post-human development.
  • 6. Feedback and editing As the project progressed, many variables and metrics were edited due to new sources of intelligence, feedback, introspection and comparative analysis versus biometrics for mood and cognition. This highlights that the variable finding and categorisation is a mutual and developmental process. Results The primary creation of the longitudinal project was a database of categorised processes, states and objects that may lead us towards or away from a post- human existence with dramatically increased lifespans. This may be the first project of its kind that seeks to catalogue processes, states and objects that we could enrich for or remove from existence in order to attain dramatically increased lifespans. This cataloging will enable milestones to be created, experiments to be performed, actions to be quantified and goals to be reached. The research is also a primer and invitation to you to think about how data could be used for post-human development and what metrics could be tracked and how to track them? A dataset of over 34,000+ variables that were predicted to be non-conducive to post-human development and 5,000+ variables that were predicted to be conducive to post-human development were recorded. These variables include instances of objects, processes, states and phrases that could be tracked and quantified. It is important to note that there are a lot of variables and factors that have been predicted to be non-conducive to post-human development, and as individuals, a society, and as decision makers we need to be both intellectually honest and rigorous about the notion that the need to deal with these negative variables in an open and ethical way. As an experiment to test the relationship between biometric data and generation of variables – miles per day on foot versus variables predicted to
  • 7. be conducive to post-human development was analysed. A negative correlation between physical activity and variables predicted per day was found – showing the influence of lifestyle on both health, and decision-making processes for post-human development (Calimport, S.R.G., 2013a). Some variables that could be tracked, quantified and reduced that were identified include: platitudes used, design by deception, deadly biodiversity, ageing, decorated traps, ritual sacrifice of animals, survival lotteries, narratives that lead to death and quantified ageing and dying rather than quantifying health and regeneration. Some variables that could be tracked, quantified and increased that were identified include: gamification for post- human development, utilisation of programmable matter, PR for post- humanism, crowdfunding post-humanism, efficiency of participation incentives, speed of machine learning, scaling of data warehousing and numbers of preventative surgeries. Core variables to attempt to quantify are whether a person wants to attain a post-human state and whether a person is successful in their role to attain a post-human state. This creates 4 distinct classes of individual – 1) those that want to attain a post-human state and are on track with the metrics and milestones being tracked 2) those that want to attain a post-human state but are not on track and need help and assistance 3) those that do not currently want to attain a post-human state for whatever reason but are actually contributing to it and 4) those who do not currently want to attain a post- human state and are not contributing to it. The possibility for individuals to move between these classes over time would be expected and between some classes –empowered and encouraged. Gathering this data would also serve as engagement and polling for researchers and proponents of post- humanism. Variables ranged in difficulty to track, similarity to variables we track now, our to quantify them, ability to analyse the, granularity of data, and spanned
  • 8. multiple disciplines of expertise. Initial analysis also showed that the types metrics recorded and how they were phrased varied greatly due to nutrition, exercise, location and mood – which shows promise for the possibility of controlling for cognitive biases and environmental effects. For the variables and factors that might be hard to quantify or attain metrics for, as most transactions and communications are being monitored already by private industry (Google Ideas, n.d.), governments (NSA/CSS Strategy, n.d.) and individuals (Quantified Self, n.d.), and the potential of data analytics increasing daily – the prospect is getting progressively easier and the future of humanity would be considered by all to be an ethical use of data that is already being collected and analysed. Discussion The primary aim - to develop a database of objects, processes and properties that may be optimal or sub-optimal for post-human development was a success in terms of generating a case study dataset of quantifiable variables as well as a host of other personal metrics. As a hypothesis generating and variable finding experiment, recording many predictions and observations for what may lead to a post-human state is perhaps the first step in the process. Data for a single individual (n=1) can be powerful for personalised medicine and to assess and inform the individual, but for mutual post-human development we need metrics on individuals and whole systems. Database entries were based on personal predictions, experience and empirical measures – therefore database items will need to be tracked, tested and validated as to whether they are optimal for post-human development conducive to dramatically increased longevity. This proof-of-principle attempted to demonstrate the wider potential and impact that ‘quantification of post-human development’ could have on a personal, governmental and international level. By quantifying our ability to
  • 9. reach milestones towards post-humanity, we can start to track, optimise, model and expedite that which we want to improve on over and above the current level of humanity. We could track increases in longevity, intelligence, philanthropy, innovation, accountability, organ transplants, social connectivity, synthetic implants, cryopreservation, and increases in beautiful, peaceful environments and individuals. We could track decreases in incidences of violence, accidental deaths, both infectious and non-infectious diseases, and the use of words and phrases that are correlated with individuals that have short lifespans or shorten the lifespans of others. We may also want to use metrics for how accurately devices and artificial intelligence can classify us based on algorithms that are optimised for identifying humans as a metric of changes in morphology and phenotype, to see which morphologies are living longer or associated with other milestones in post-human development. Currently big data, personal data and augmentation bring up issues such as privacy, autonomy concerns, power imbalances, and issues of discrimination and access. By adding quantification of post-human development to the narrative of human progress this could inform bioethical inquiry, investment, governance and policy. A quantified and machine intelligence assisted approach is not meant to replace human decision-making, but augment decision makers, be they citizens or governmental bodies with the tools to assist us in how best to augment ourselves and improve society. A meta-analysis of the health, intelligence and wellbeing of stakeholders and decision makers as well as finding common metrics to track between stakeholders and decision makers – would increase both objectivity and inclusivity. The multi-layered quantification of systems, individuals and decision makers would allow for an objective, inclusive, quantitative approach to post-human development that includes accountability on the behalf of society and decision makers.
  • 10. Call to Action I would like to end with a call to action –a call to create a social, professional and academic environment that is not only conducive to the quantification of and development of a post-human future, but is actively, explicitly and openly working towards it. At present there are at least 5 identifiable actions we can perform to enhance the quantification of post-human development. 1) Increase the number of researchers and stakeholders that are involved in the research fields conducive to post-human development and longevity – namely those that utilise diverse interdisciplinary datasets, big data, self-tracking data, and machine learning. 2) Increase the number of stakeholders with access to the data and skillsets needed to perform quantification experiments for post-human development. Including in private industry, academia, data science and government institutes. This may include the creation of a range projects that utilise crowdsourcing, citizen science, international partnerships and utilisation of institutes that specialise in increasing lifespan and prototyping environments and lifestyles. 3) Increase interest in the concept of quantifying and optimising post- human development as a transdisciplinary, scientifically grounded and ethical discipline. 4) Increase the willingness and ability for professional scientists and key stakeholders to stand up and speak out and say that they want to use the most scientific, rigorous and advanced trans-disciplinary techniques for post-human development. This includes being able to speak openly about dramatic, healthy increases in lifespan and the creation of next generation habitats. This would also include the creation of a social and professional environment where scientists and stakeholders can state that their long-term goals for dramatically increased lifespans,
  • 11. astroengineering and creation of paradise-like environments – in an environment that values and supports this. 5) Increase political lobbying, social engagement, collective action and personal relations on issues of post-human development so that parties and policies start to reflect post-human ideals. Through political action we can develop countries and work environments whose primary aims are to dramatically increase longevity and create proto- paradises. References: Calimport, S.R.G. 2013a. Quantified Self EU 2013 conference. Memomics and meme-longevity interactions. May 12. Amsterdam: Hotel Casa 400. Available at http://www.slideshare.net/stuartcalimport/memomics-and- memelongevity-interactions [Accessed 31 August 2013] Calimport, S.R.G. 2013b. Memes Predicted Optimal or Sub-optimal for Lifespan (date). Available at http://www-958.ibm.com/software/analytics/manyeyes/users/stuartcalimport [Accessed 31 August 2013] Chellappa, R., Sinha, P., & Phillips, P. J. (2010). Face Recognition by Computers and Humans. Computer, 43(2), 46–55. doi:10.1109/MC.2010.37 Google Ideas (n.d.) Google Ideas. Available at https://www.google.com/ideas/about [Accessed 31 August 2013] Health 2.0 (n.d.) Health 2.0. Available at http://www.health2con.com/ [Accessed 31 August 2013]
  • 12. Jungebluth, P., Moll, G., Baiguera, S., & Macchiarini, P. (2012). Tissue engineered airway: a regenerative solution. Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics, 91(1), 81–93. doi:10.1038/clpt.2011.270 Letouze, E. (2011). Big Data for Development: Challenges & Opportunities (white paper) Available at http://www.unglobalpulse.org/projects/BigDataforDevelopment [Accessed 31 August 2013] Mathers, C.D., Murray, C.J.L., Lopez, A.D., Salomon, J.A., Sadana, R., Tandon, A., Ustun, B.L.. Estimates of healthy life expectancy for 191 countries in the year 2000 (white paper) Available at http://www.who.int/healthinfo/paper38.pdf [Accessed 31 August 2013] MRC Brain Banking (n.d.) MRC Brain Banking – science. Available at http://www.mrc.ac.uk/Ourresearch/Resourceservices/UKBrainBanksnetwork/B rainbanking/index.htm [Accessed 31 August 2013] National Security Agency (n.d.) NSA/CSS Strategy. Available at http://www.nsa.gov/about/_files/nsacss_strategy.pdf [Accessed 31 August 2013] Quantified Self (n.d.). Quantified Self. Available at http://quantifiedself.com/ [Accessed 31 August 2013] Quantified Self (n.d.). Quantified Self, Guide To Self-Tracking. Available at http://quantifiedself.com/guide/
  • 13. [Accessed 31 August 2013] The Seasteading Institute (n.d.) The Seasteading Institute. Available at http://www.seasteading.org/ [Accessed 31 August 2013] The Venus Project (n.d) The Venus Project. Beyond Politics Poverty and War. http://www.thevenusproject.com/ [Accessed 31 August 2013] World report on violence and health: summary. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2002. Available at http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/violence/world_report/en/summ ary_en.pdf [Accessed 31 August 2013] Zancanaro, C., Biggiogera, M., Malatesta, M., Ayre, M. Mammalian Hibernation: Relevance to a Possible Human Hypometabolic State. ESA Report [on-line]. Available at http://www.esa.int/gsp/ACT/doc/ARI/ARI%20Study%20Report/ACT-RPT-BIO- ARI-036501-Morpheus-Verona.pdf [Accessed 31 August 2013]

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