Programme Leadership Course Version 2.6 February 2009 Leading Successful Programmes
Course Objectives <ul><li>What you will learn from this course </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What a programme is, and how to  lead...
What is a Programme? The bus of success carries many passengers, but the bicycle of failure is a vehicle made for one --St...
What is a Programme? <ul><li>What is a programme </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What are the characteristics of a programme? </li><...
What makes a programme successful? PROCESS PEOPLE TECHNOLOGY Collateral Knowledge Procedures Forums Terms of Reference Dir...
What is leadership <ul><li>Origins of leadership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Alpha Male </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Physical stre...
Attributes of leadership <ul><li>Upbringing  </li></ul><ul><li>Uprising / Events </li></ul><ul><li>Vision (Outcome) </li><...
Examples of great leaders <ul><li>Alexander the Great </li></ul><ul><li>Boudica, Queen of the Iceni </li></ul><ul><li>Napo...
Exercise:  Consider these leaders <ul><li>TEAM 1:   Consider the following “war leaders” – “Admiral Lord Nelson & Churchil...
Types of Leadership <ul><li>Hierarchical leadership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You will attend meetings on-time </li></ul></ul>...
Charisma <ul><li>What is charisma?  Why is it important? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you get charisma?  Are you “born with it...
Power <ul><li>What is power?  Why is it important? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you get power?  Are you “given power”? </li></...
Leadership style <ul><li>If you use consensus leadership, how do you reflect your disappointment, frustration or anger if ...
Leadership Styles – key factors <ul><li>A natural empathy with your key stakeholders </li></ul><ul><li>Single-mindedness, ...
Leadership Styles – key factors <ul><li>The ability to focus remorselessly on the desired outcome </li></ul><ul><li>Disinc...
Using psychology to lead <ul><li>Have empathy with the client & the organisation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>I understand and ac...
Management vs Leadership <ul><li>What is the difference between a good “manager” and a good “leader”?  </li></ul><ul><ul><...
Common scenarios <ul><li>The following are very common for programme managers coming onto a new programme.  What do you do...
The difficult decisions <ul><li>Which approach is better? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To get managers to take accountability or ...
Programme Manager’s top-tips <ul><li>Allow yourself time to make good, well-informed decisions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t...
Programme Dimensions Every obstacle yields to stern resolve. --Leonardo da Vinci
Programme Dimensions <ul><li>Risk - likelihood of a successful outcome </li></ul><ul><li>Product what is it? </li></ul><ul...
Managing the levers of RISK
Programme Dimensions Page  REDUCE SCOPE INCREASE BUDGET INCREASE TIME LOWER QUALITY INCREASE SCOPE REDUCE BUDGET REDUCE TI...
Reducing scope results in... Page  SCOPE Fewer Geographies Less Functionality / Completixy Lower Test Time/Costs Less Func...
Increasing time results in... Page  TIME Extend Delivery Timescales Fewer/Smaller Test Infrastructure Capital/Maint Costs ...
Reducing quality results in... Page  QUALITY Reduce Code Quality Higher Defect Rates & Re-work (increasing Development cos...
Quality is key! <ul><li>Quality </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If there are no quality criteria defined, there can be no quality me...
Creating a high-performing ORGANISATION Coming together is a beginning, staying together is progress, and working together...
Creating a high-performing ORGANISATION <ul><li>Types of organisation </li></ul><ul><li>Matrix Management / Competency poo...
Different types of organisation <ul><li>Hierarchical Traditional [Alexander the Great/Adam Smith] </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Th...
Challenges with a hierarchical organisation <ul><li>Inflexible </li></ul><ul><li>Long chains of command to the top </li></...
How does governance fit in? <ul><li>PMO </li></ul><ul><li>Architecture Design Board </li></ul><ul><li>how is this comprise...
Organisational cohesion <ul><li>Everyone  in the organisation MUST have clear objectives, consistent with the objectives o...
Communications <ul><li>It is  essential  that the programme manager communicates directly with the entire organisation  ve...
Organisational cohesion <ul><li>Example of a programme booklet </li></ul>
Organisational performance <ul><li>A dysfunctional programme organisation WILL fail </li></ul><ul><li>Nothing should be a ...
Organisational performance Don’t know what they are doing Can’t be arsed Do know what they are doing Can’t be arsed Don’t ...
Organisation top-tips? <ul><li>There is no right or wrong way to organise a programme. </li></ul><ul><li>The more the prog...
Managing the Client
Managing the client <ul><li>What does the client want </li></ul><ul><ul><li>HIS STUFF DELIVERED –  on time, on budget and ...
Managing the a difficult client <ul><li>What kind of influencing styles can one deploy against a difficult client </li></u...
Managing the Client THE BUSINESS CASE
Why is a business case important <ul><li>It answers the question for the client “Why am I doing this” </li></ul><ul><li>It...
What should go in a business case? <ul><li>Financial </li></ul><ul><li>Non-financial </li></ul><ul><li>Not doing the initi...
What should go in a business case? <ul><li>Summary of the proposal, key benefits, timescales, costs, risks, approval to pr...
Business Case Levers <ul><li>Revenue Enhancement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When the programme has completed we are expecting t...
Business Case Levers <ul><li>Revenue Enhancement is the hardest value to predict in a business case, because a business is...
Business Case Levers <ul><li>Is the business case “agnostic”? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Is this the sponsor’s “pet project” </...
Managing the Client THE REQUIREMENTS
What are requirements <ul><li>They are what the client “wants you to deliver” </li></ul><ul><li>They are unambiguous state...
Requirements pitfalls <ul><li>The solution must comply with all applicable laws </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Which laws are appli...
Requirements pitfalls <ul><li>Be careful of the distinction between a “BUSINESS REQUIREMENT” and an IT FUNCTIONAL REQUIREM...
What are the “types” of requirements Business SME input Business Driver Research Industry Best Practice Customer Experienc...
Requirements pitfalls <ul><li>Business Requirements Specification (BRS) says “we want a car.  It must have gauges.” </li><...
Managing the Client THE COMMERCIALS
Managing the COMMERCIALS <ul><li>Tripartite relationships rarely work! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Who is accountable?  What if ...
Managing the COMMERCIALS <ul><li>Always use a structured procurement process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Request for Information...
COMMERCIALS GOLDEN RULES <ul><li>If you MEASURE the wrong things, you create the wrong BEHAVIOURS which leads to the wrong...
Managing a programme’s PROCESSES NineDimensions approach
Managing the Processes <ul><li>The NineDimensions Approach </li></ul><ul><ul><li>RAID Management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><l...
Processes and controls <ul><li>There should be no need to describe how to fill out a load of forms/logs for Programme cont...
What level should I be managing at? <ul><li>Recommend managing at the “work-package” level </li></ul><ul><li>Dependencies ...
Work-package Descriptions <ul><li>What should be in a WDP? </li></ul><ul><li>Should be completed by  </li></ul><ul><li>the...
RAGs <ul><li>It is essential that commonly agreed and understood status for RAGs are defined and communicated.  Otherwise,...
Managing a programme’s PROCESSES A successful PMO
Managing the Processes <ul><li>A Successful PMO </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What does a good PMO do? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>...
Key Success Factors – what benefits does a PMO bring? <ul><li>When we know what we should be doing each week and we know w...
Programme Management Office Organisation & Activities <ul><li>Financial Controller </li></ul><ul><li>Order Management </li...
KSFs – what does the role needs to succeed? <ul><li>Programme Manager </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Providing leadership and engag...
Example of PMO service levels <ul><li>New starter (due to join) </li></ul><ul><li>Desk move </li></ul><ul><li>Access to do...
Programme Pitfalls and Assurance
Key attributes of a successful programme <ul><li>Managed, achievable expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Commonly believed in P...
Programme Assurance <ul><li>Poor programme managers fear “assurance & audit” </li></ul><ul><li>Excellent programme manager...
Programme Assurance Survey <ul><li>Enclosed is a 100 question quick survey which a programme manager can use to get the te...
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Maddison Ward Leading Successful Programmes Public

  1. 1. Programme Leadership Course Version 2.6 February 2009 Leading Successful Programmes
  2. 2. Course Objectives <ul><li>What you will learn from this course </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What a programme is, and how to lead it </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What levers you can use to drive a programme to a successful outcome </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How to maintain a high-performing delivery organisation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How to manage the client </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What processes you need to have in place to monitor and control a programme </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What you will not learn </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Anything about methodologies, such as Prince, Agile, RUP etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What documents you need to produce when </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How to use Microsoft Project </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. What is a Programme? The bus of success carries many passengers, but the bicycle of failure is a vehicle made for one --Stuart Robb 2001
  4. 4. What is a Programme? <ul><li>What is a programme </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What are the characteristics of a programme? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How does this differ from a project? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Does “size” matter? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is the difference between a “project” and a “workstream / workpackage”? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What makes a programme “successful”? </li></ul>
  5. 5. What makes a programme successful? PROCESS PEOPLE TECHNOLOGY Collateral Knowledge Procedures Forums Terms of Reference Directory Structures Project Folders Signoffs/Acceptances Culture Behaviours Leadership Training Incentives/Reward Peer Reviews Monitoring Environment Milestone Management Risk/Issue Management Portfolio Management Financial Management Resource Management Knowledge Management Configuration Management Microsoft Project RAID Logs (Excel/MS Access) Timesheeting (Clarity)
  6. 6. What is leadership <ul><li>Origins of leadership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Alpha Male </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Physical strength vs intellectual strength </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2001 – A Space Odyssey </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ape “takes the lead” using a bone as a weapon </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Others “follow” the leader </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Example of “intellectual leadership” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Take the lead – it wasn’t given! </li></ul>
  7. 7. Attributes of leadership <ul><li>Upbringing </li></ul><ul><li>Uprising / Events </li></ul><ul><li>Vision (Outcome) </li></ul><ul><li>Motivation (Passion) </li></ul><ul><li>Mobilisation (Team-building) </li></ul><ul><li>Tenaciousness (Decisiveness) </li></ul><ul><li>CHARISMA </li></ul>
  8. 8. Examples of great leaders <ul><li>Alexander the Great </li></ul><ul><li>Boudica, Queen of the Iceni </li></ul><ul><li>Napoleon Bonaparte </li></ul><ul><li>Admiral Lord Nelson </li></ul><ul><li>Mohandas Ghandi </li></ul><ul><li>Adolf Hitler </li></ul><ul><li>Winston Churchill </li></ul><ul><li>John F Kennedy </li></ul><ul><li>Margaret Thatcher </li></ul><ul><li>After a great height, comes a great fall! </li></ul>CONDISER: Many of these leaders are only recognisable as being “great” for a relatively short period or during some key event! Often, their “greatness” went catastrophically awry having reached their pinnacle.
  9. 9. Exercise: Consider these leaders <ul><li>TEAM 1: Consider the following “war leaders” – “Admiral Lord Nelson & Churchill” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What qualities did they exhibit as a great leaders? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>TEAM 2: Consider the following “civil rights leaders” – “Ghandi, Nelson Mandela, Malcolm X” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What qualities do each of these leaders exhibit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How does their style differ from the previous example (Churchill & Nelson) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Each had their own success. What attributes did they exhibit that made them identifiable as great leaders? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>TEAM 3: Consider the following “business leaders” – “Richard Branson, Alan Sugar, Gordon Ramsay” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What qualities do each of these leaders exhibit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How does their style differ from the previous examples </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Each had their own success. What attributes did they exhibit that made them identifiable as great business leaders? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What do you perceive their failings as? </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Types of Leadership <ul><li>Hierarchical leadership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You will attend meetings on-time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do it your own way at your own risk </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Directional </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(Vertical leadership) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Consensus leadership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can we all agree that we will attend meetings on-time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Also known as facilitative leadership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>I’m delegating accountability to you to deliver. I will support you, but I’m paying you good money, treat it like it’s your own company </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Empowering </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(Horizontal leadership) </li></ul></ul>MILITARY (leaders promoted/honed) “ CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT” (leaders emerge/evolve) Which style is better?
  11. 11. Charisma <ul><li>What is charisma? Why is it important? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you get charisma? Are you “born with it”? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the relationship between charisma, respect and power? ? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What happens when you try to exercise Power without Charisma </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Can you deliver a programme without Charismar? </li></ul>
  12. 12. Power <ul><li>What is power? Why is it important? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you get power? Are you “given power”? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the relationship between Power and Respect? ? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What happens when you try to exercise Power without Respect </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What happens when you try to take power and face resistance (Revenge Cycles) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can you have power, but still have friends on the programme (what level of “detachment” do you need?) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>When should you use the three types of power? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Power over (taken) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Power under (given) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Power sharing (consensus) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Can you deliver a programme without Power? </li></ul>
  13. 13. Leadership style <ul><li>If you use consensus leadership, how do you reflect your disappointment, frustration or anger if that person doesn’t deliver? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most effective representation of “anger” is expressing it without the “high drama” of rage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You still have the same “power”, even if you don’t express it by shouting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>However, you must assert your disappointment clearly, using the right vocabulary and body language (you must retain “control”) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You have a “right” to be angry, however you need to maintain a respectful, non-abusive, clean approach to dealing with the situation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Avoid “Revenge Cycles” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You are expressing your rage with me by shouting at me/abusing me </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>I’m going to find “passive/aggressive” ways to undermine you </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Many programmes fail because they have a poor relationship with team members </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Avoid “I did my best” mentality </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Accepting failure! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Losers do their best. Winners go home with the “prom queen” – Sean Connery (The Rock) </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Leadership Styles – key factors <ul><li>A natural empathy with your key stakeholders </li></ul><ul><li>Single-mindedness, strength of vision & strength of purpose </li></ul><ul><li>Sceptical of conventional wisdom </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Just because this is the way it’s always been, doesn’t make it the best way” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Balance with “Why risk something new when the traditional way is proven, low risk” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conventional wisdom is often the path of least resistance (people are naturally change resistant) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Other attributes of exceptional leaders </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Clear thinking </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Careful preparation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exceptional energy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Willpower </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. Leadership Styles – key factors <ul><li>The ability to focus remorselessly on the desired outcome </li></ul><ul><li>Disinclined to see two sides to any question or work for consensus because that would imply doubt and indecision </li></ul><ul><li>Need sage, trusted counsel to back your judgment </li></ul><ul><li>Create an environment of CHANGE INEVITABILITY (it will change, whether you resist or support) </li></ul><ul><li>Know how to be pragmatic and when to retreat, (making smoke when necessary) </li></ul><ul><li>Balance pragmatism with steely resolve </li></ul>
  16. 16. Using psychology to lead <ul><li>Have empathy with the client & the organisation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>I understand and acknowledge your point of view, but... </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have you thought of... Might it be possible to... </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Using emotions to drive behaviour </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Assertiveness vs aggressiveness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creating the balance between strength and friendship </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Your style dictates the style the programme exhibits </li></ul><ul><li>If you don’t COMMAND respect, you won’t get any. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What are the ways you get to command respect? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What builds a cohesive, driven, motivated team? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Your strength should be big picture, you need a deputy who does detail </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(eg. a PMO manager) </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Management vs Leadership <ul><li>What is the difference between a good “manager” and a good “leader”? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe the characteristics of each </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Why is leadership vital in programme management and not in project management </li></ul><ul><li>Consider about the following statement. </li></ul><ul><li>Managers manage tasks? </li></ul><ul><li>Leaders manage people? </li></ul>
  18. 18. Common scenarios <ul><li>The following are very common for programme managers coming onto a new programme. What do you do about them? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Project managers are poor / low calibre. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No PMO, client doesn’t see the need for them / doesn’t want to pay for one </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Client has read he needs a programme manager in an airport magazine but doesn’t really know what to expect from one </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Previous PM was very good at creating/following procedures but the programme is hopelessly late (why?) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Clients expectations are completely unrealistic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Client has no idea what it takes to deliver what is being asked for </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Key client stakeholders have totally different, misaligned objectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Programme is being “led” by the technology and the technical architects who are “excited” by the prospect of loads of new technology </li></ul></ul>
  19. 19. The difficult decisions <ul><li>Which approach is better? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To get managers to take accountability or to avoid a blame culture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To recycle a weak team or to reinforce with expensive consultants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To maintain the dialogue with the client or to lead the project managers in developing the plans </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To develop solutions to key problems or to send the team away to come up with options </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To share the team’s concerns around the delivery timeframes or to maintain a stubborn focus on delivering to the date </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To tell the client the date’s not achievable or to keep pursuing regardless until you either succeed by force of will or the date is missed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>None of these questions have a black or white answer. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>There are many factors that can influence the right course of action, the behaviour of the client, the lifecycle of the programme, the behaviour of the team... </li></ul></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Programme Manager’s top-tips <ul><li>Allow yourself time to make good, well-informed decisions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t waste a lot of time gathering loads of data or getting buried in information. Your team should distill key information into two or three options. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be decisive! Ensure you make a decision quickly, and then stick to it. It is ok to change a decision occasionally if new information comes to light, but don’t make a habit of it. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Surround yourself with good people and particularly good project managers. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Make sure they’re on the hook to deliver and they feel the pain when they don’t </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allow them to learn from their mistakes and failures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t be afraid to refuse to sign things off if they don’t meet your expectations or they don’t sound right. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn to say “NO” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It’s ok to “DO NOTHING” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Know your goals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>And clearly understand your mandate and the extent of your powers. Eg. Can you fire someone on the programme? If you disagree with a technical decision, are you empowered to overrule it? </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Programme Dimensions Every obstacle yields to stern resolve. --Leonardo da Vinci
  22. 22. Programme Dimensions <ul><li>Risk - likelihood of a successful outcome </li></ul><ul><li>Product what is it? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Scope: what am I going to get </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Time: when will I get it </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost: how much will it cost me </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quality: will it work? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Organisation who delivers it? </li></ul><ul><li>Process how does it get delivered? </li></ul><ul><li>Client/Business is it what I’m expecting? </li></ul>PRODUCT CLIENT ORGANISATION PROCESS RISK OUTCOME
  23. 23. Managing the levers of RISK
  24. 24. Programme Dimensions Page REDUCE SCOPE INCREASE BUDGET INCREASE TIME LOWER QUALITY INCREASE SCOPE REDUCE BUDGET REDUCE TIME INCREASE QUALITY RISK There are four levers to play with – the challenge is to set each lever at just the right place that the programme is stable, deliverable and an equilibrium is established. 1. BUDGET 2. SCOPE 3. QUALITY 4. TIME Risk Balancing Act
  25. 25. Reducing scope results in... Page SCOPE Fewer Geographies Less Functionality / Completixy Lower Test Time/Costs Less Functionality Delivered (Lower Revenues?) Lower Application Build Time/Cost Lower Infrastructure Capital/Maintenance Costs (Test) Lower Volumes / Customers Lower Infratructure Build/Support Costs (Test) Less Infrastructure Capital/Maintenance Costs (Prod/DR) Lower Implementation Costs Potential For Performance Bottlenecks Less payback Cost Reduction Levers
  26. 26. Increasing time results in... Page TIME Extend Delivery Timescales Fewer/Smaller Test Infrastructure Capital/Maint Costs Date is fixed and will not deliver all functionality Lower Peak Resource Load Cost Lower Infrastructure Capital/Maintenance Costs (Test) Reduce Parallel Activities Lower Infratructure Build/Support Costs (Test) Reduce Management Overhead Costs Lower Infrastructure Capital/Main Costs (Test) Not all functionality delivered Lower Infrastructure Build/Support Costs (Test) Reduced Resource Costs for Complex Integration Cost Reduction Levers
  27. 27. Reducing quality results in... Page QUALITY Reduce Code Quality Higher Defect Rates & Re-work (increasing Development costs) Faster Coding Time (potential lower resource costs) Undertake Less Testing Lower Infratructure Build/Support Costs (Test) Less Infrastructure Capital/Maintenance Costs (Test) Lower Application Development Costs Increased Risk of Application Failure Utilise More Offshore Resources (lower unit cost/da) Provide Service With Less Resilience Fewer Test Resources Increased Risk of Unexpected/Erroneous Results Higher Testing Costs Lower Infrastructure Build/Support Costs (assuming offshore d/c) Less Infrastructure Capital/Maintenance Costs (Prod/DR) Risk of Extended Service Outage Risk of Missing Contractual SLA’s Risk of Missing Settlement Deadlines Increased Management Overhead Costs Stronger Governance Required, Increased Governance Costss Cost Reduction Levers
  28. 28. Quality is key! <ul><li>Quality </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If there are no quality criteria defined, there can be no quality measurement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If quality can’t be measured, it can’t be managed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If quality isn’t reviewed, it is unknown (until the thing’s delivered) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If new technology or unproven methods are utilised, expect a higher error / issue rate, reduced quality, less knowledge / experience and therefore corresponding increases in time & cost </li></ul></ul><ul><li>It is vital to have proper quality criteria for each of the major delivery areas. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>It is also vital to have a quality plan/approach, a list of products/deliverables to be reviewed and a plan to review them! </li></ul></ul>
  29. 29. Creating a high-performing ORGANISATION Coming together is a beginning, staying together is progress, and working together is success. --Henry Ford
  30. 30. Creating a high-performing ORGANISATION <ul><li>Types of organisation </li></ul><ul><li>Matrix Management / Competency pools </li></ul><ul><li>Organisational cohesion & communications </li></ul><ul><li>Organisational performance </li></ul>
  31. 31. Different types of organisation <ul><li>Hierarchical Traditional [Alexander the Great/Adam Smith] </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Army </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Competency High “projects” focus, low “business as usual” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CapGemini </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accenture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bechtel </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Product Commodity focus, low “consulting” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Microsoft </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Oracle </li></ul></ul>Product lifecycle Project outcomes Steady state / BAU
  32. 32. Challenges with a hierarchical organisation <ul><li>Inflexible </li></ul><ul><li>Long chains of command to the top </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Poor communications </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Potential for conflict of priorities if mixing project and BAU work </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Matrix management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who owns the “final say”? </li></ul></ul>
  33. 33. How does governance fit in? <ul><li>PMO </li></ul><ul><li>Architecture Design Board </li></ul><ul><li>how is this comprised? </li></ul><ul><li>Who has the final say? </li></ul><ul><li>Assurance & Governance functions </li></ul><ul><li>Who is accountable? </li></ul><ul><li>Role of Portfolio Management </li></ul>
  34. 34. Organisational cohesion <ul><li>Everyone in the organisation MUST have clear objectives, consistent with the objectives of the programme </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone in the organisation MUST know what they are responsible for and accountable to deliver </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone in the organisation MUST know who they report to for what </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone in the organisation MUST be measured and bonused on objectives relevant to the successful outcome of the programme </li></ul><ul><li>The programme manager MUST regularly verify that everyone in the organisation is crystal clear on all of the above </li></ul>
  35. 35. Communications <ul><li>It is essential that the programme manager communicates directly with the entire organisation verbally using “cascades” on a regular basis. </li></ul><ul><li>It is absolutely essential that everyone in the organisation feels they can openly and honestly report problems and communicate issues. </li></ul><ul><li>It is vital that the programme manager has two-way communications with team members at ALL levels, not just through the management team. </li></ul><ul><li>ALL decisions regarding structure , pay & conditions etc MUST be decided upon and communicated RAPIDLY . </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A vacuum created by uncertainty over any of the following KILLS a programme </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What am I doing (and why am I doing it) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Who do I report to </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How does what I’m doing fit in </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Is the programme scope/date changing </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Am I being renewed </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Are there any changes in the terms of my engagement in the programme </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Are my personal objectives closely aligned with what I’m being asked to do </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Is the client happy </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>MIGHT WE SLIP THE DATES? </li></ul></ul></ul>
  36. 36. Organisational cohesion <ul><li>Example of a programme booklet </li></ul>
  37. 37. Organisational performance <ul><li>A dysfunctional programme organisation WILL fail </li></ul><ul><li>Nothing should be a barrier to success </li></ul><ul><li>Strength of will and strength of purpose are the key </li></ul><ul><li>There are no such terms as... </li></ul><ul><ul><li>It can’t be done </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It will never work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>There’s insufficient time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If you accept these phrases, you are, by implication, accepting failure – </li></ul><ul><li>The question is, however, what is the balance between dogged determination and “listening to wise counsel” </li></ul><ul><li>(pragmatism vs steely resolve) </li></ul>
  38. 38. Organisational performance Don’t know what they are doing Can’t be arsed Do know what they are doing Can’t be arsed Don’t know what they are doing Keen Do know what they are doing Keen (but a pain in the arse) SACK TRAIN MOTIVATE MANAGE <ul><li>There is NO perfect team member. Just can do or can’t do!!!! </li></ul>
  39. 39. Organisation top-tips? <ul><li>There is no right or wrong way to organise a programme. </li></ul><ul><li>The more the programme fits into the existing organisation structure, the easier it will be to make work </li></ul><ul><li>Programme organisation charts are frequently a nightmare (as they are highly political and are often at odds with the company org-structure). </li></ul>
  40. 40. Managing the Client
  41. 41. Managing the client <ul><li>What does the client want </li></ul><ul><ul><li>HIS STUFF DELIVERED – on time, on budget and exceeding his expectations! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CONFIDENCE – that his delivery is with a safe pair of hands </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>THE TRUTH – he’s going to find out eventually anyway </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What does the client want to KNOW? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What am I getting? Is it still what I want? SCOPE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do my people keep dreaming up more things to do? CHANGE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What have I spent / How much more am I in for? COST </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Am I still going to make any money out of this? BENEFITS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When am I going to get it / is it on track SCHEDULE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is there anything likely to cause the wheels to come off? RISK </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is there anything holding us up I can do something about ISSUES </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do I need to decide anything or give guidance DECISIONS </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Have the senior stakeholders or sponsors changed? High churn in executive sponsorship spells trouble </li></ul>
  42. 42. Managing the a difficult client <ul><li>What kind of influencing styles can one deploy against a difficult client </li></ul><ul><li>Managing expectation </li></ul>
  43. 43. Managing the Client THE BUSINESS CASE
  44. 44. Why is a business case important <ul><li>It answers the question for the client “Why am I doing this” </li></ul><ul><li>It ensures the client “keeps the faith” </li></ul><ul><li>House renovation example </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Why would you invest in a renovation project property </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How much would you spend on the renovations </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How much do you expect to make </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Film investment example </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Invest in this film, it’s going to be great, really exciting, lots of stars... </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How do I know it is going to make money </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What are the major cost variables </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How do I know what I need to measure & monitor in order to know whether I’m going to make any money </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Investing in something should be “informed”. It should NEVER be a leap of faith. </li></ul></ul>
  45. 45. What should go in a business case? <ul><li>Financial </li></ul><ul><li>Non-financial </li></ul><ul><li>Not doing the initiative </li></ul><ul><li>A business case needs to be:- </li></ul><ul><li>Measurable & MEASURED </li></ul><ul><li>Realistic, not fantasy </li></ul><ul><li>Assumptions MUST be evidentially supported </li></ul>
  46. 46. What should go in a business case? <ul><li>Summary of the proposal, key benefits, timescales, costs, risks, approval to proceed (and spend) to next stage - 2 – 3 pages </li></ul><ul><li>Detailed Business Case </li></ul><ul><li>Current situation, rationale for change, description of opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>What is proposed, including outcomes/objectives </li></ul><ul><li>How does the initiative fit with any overall business strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Over what timeframe, key milestones, level of planning detail </li></ul><ul><li>Financial analysis, commitments at each stage gate, cashflow, funding, variance, procurement, discounted cashflow (NPV) </li></ul><ul><li>Sensitivity analysis, key risks & issues </li></ul><ul><li>KPIs, tangible/intangible business benefits </li></ul><ul><li>Effect of not proceeding </li></ul><ul><li>Other options considered, including costings, reasons for rejection </li></ul><ul><li>Impacts of business-as-usual operations, headcounts, other projects/dependencies </li></ul><ul><li>Next steps & Appendicies </li></ul>
  47. 47. Business Case Levers <ul><li>Revenue Enhancement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When the programme has completed we are expecting this amount of revenue growth. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cost Reduction </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We currently spend this amount on doing this stuff, after the programme we will spend that </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Risk Reduction </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If we don’t do this, we can expect this amount of fraud </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Compliance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We will be “fined” this amount if we don’t do this </li></ul></ul><ul><li>QUESTION: Would I spend MY OWN MONEY on this? </li></ul>
  48. 48. Business Case Levers <ul><li>Revenue Enhancement is the hardest value to predict in a business case, because a business is never stable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Has revenue grown because of my programme or because of new products we introduced or the fact that the market conditions have changed, one of our competitors went bust, we came out of recession etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cost Reduction is the easiest to measure because most organisation’s cost management and FTE management will easily determine changes to the cost profile </li></ul><ul><li>BUSINESS CASE GOLDEN RULES </li></ul><ul><ul><li>All assumptions MUST be closely scrutinised, because many are rubbish </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you can’t measure it in isolation, you can’t tell what’s impacting it </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Many business cases aren’t worth the paper they’re written on </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>At its most basic form, the client simply wants to know what he’s going to make out of it, and whether he would be better off sticking the money in the bank. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you don’t measure the benefits post go-live, you don’t know whether what you’ve delivered has added any value. </li></ul></ul>
  49. 49. Business Case Levers <ul><li>Is the business case “agnostic”? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Is this the sponsor’s “pet project” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How likely is it the business case will be rejected and the programme not proceed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Would the sponsor be willing to sacrifice his own salary/bonus on the definite, measurable results from the business case </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Where a business case has options, has the team chosen their preferred option, as opposed to the one most likely to produce the highest benefits? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CRM are classics – is the “big package” the best solution? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In order to make back £50m, you have to have very significant uplifts in revenue and profit. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Business cases are “orders of magnitude” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Variance in accuracy depends on the amount invested in driving out the detail </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A business case is a living document – at each stage, as more is known, more detail should be incorporated into the case in order to determine whether the programme is still worth proceeding with </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>100% of the costs of a programme will be known when it is finished & spent! </li></ul></ul>
  50. 50. Managing the Client THE REQUIREMENTS
  51. 51. What are requirements <ul><li>They are what the client “wants you to deliver” </li></ul><ul><li>They are unambiguous statements of need </li></ul><ul><li>They are realistic and achievable </li></ul><ul><li>They can be directly correlated to a business benefit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(so we know what value each requirement is contributing) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>There aren’t too many of them in each phase of work </li></ul><ul><li>They aren’t dictating the solution in a way that increases risk </li></ul><ul><li>They are uniquely referenced </li></ul><ul><li>They are “standalone” and not “embedded” </li></ul><ul><li>The most important thing is that a programme team member can read one, and clearly understand what the client wants without having to clarify it. </li></ul>
  52. 52. Requirements pitfalls <ul><li>The solution must comply with all applicable laws </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Which laws are applicable? This is a “catch all requirement” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The solution must comply with ISO20020 Information Governance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This is not one requirement. This is hundreds of requirements, all contained in the ISO 20020 document. Each one of these should be individually specified </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The solution must have the ability to use multiple dictionaries and support multiple languages & character sets </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This is not one requirement, it is three. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The system must provide tools like calendar and calculator </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To do what? Like???? What else? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The solution must support changes to the challenge/response password </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This is highly ambiguous – what does this actually mean??? How? Using an online system, phoning a call centre etc. etc. This could be three lines of code or a whole business process </li></ul></ul><ul><li>None of the above have reference numbers, so there is no traceability, nor is there any rationale as to what business benefit they support or why! </li></ul>
  53. 53. Requirements pitfalls <ul><li>Be careful of the distinction between a “BUSINESS REQUIREMENT” and an IT FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENT “ </li></ul><ul><li>Are there any non-functional requirements (particularly business ones, such as business volumetrics (number of users/geographies), service levels that must be achieved </li></ul><ul><li>Are there any business change requirements specified (new ways of working). Do there need to be any? </li></ul><ul><li>Has the “customer” impact been considered – how do the requirements relate to the “customer experience”. Has the customer experience been defined. </li></ul><ul><li>Have “data” requirements been specified? (Reference data sources / data retention). All these things have impact on costs. </li></ul><ul><li>Poorly defined requirements lead to poorly delivered programmes, lots of change requests and lots of aggravation with the client. </li></ul>
  54. 54. What are the “types” of requirements Business SME input Business Driver Research Industry Best Practice Customer Experience Lifecycle Customer Experience Definition Business Model Business Case Target To-be Processes Impacted Processes Process KPI’s & Volumetrics Process-led requirements Process Maps Hypotheses Business (People) Requirements Functional Requirements (Technology) Non-Functional Requirements (Technology) Business Environment Requirements Organisational Impact Assessment Systems Requirements Organisational Requirements Systems Functional Requirements Business Requirements Specification Prioritised Initiatives “ PEOPLE” “ PROCESS” “ TECHNOLOGY”
  55. 55. Requirements pitfalls <ul><li>Business Requirements Specification (BRS) says “we want a car. It must have gauges.” </li></ul><ul><li>Discovery phase conducted between client and systems integrator created a functional requirements document that says “it must be a car, have four wheels and be able to carry two passengers. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Didn’t mention gauges at all. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>SI provided a contract with a referring document stipulating the functional requirements as the scope </li></ul><ul><li>The Business had some “implicit requirements” that appear to have been omitted or assumed. For example; </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The car must be able to travel off-road </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The car must be capable of reaching 155mph </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In addition to the regular vehicle gauges, the car must have a differential temperature gauge, a gearbox oil temperature gauge and a tilt meter. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>People must be able to drive! </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Contract that the Client has signed can be fulfilled with a Suzuki Jeep </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The basis of the Systems Integrator estimating and costing </li></ul></ul><ul><li>BRS, including all the implicit “detailed” requirements indicate that the need is for a Porsche Cheyanne and driving lessons! </li></ul>
  56. 56. Managing the Client THE COMMERCIALS
  57. 57. Managing the COMMERCIALS <ul><li>Tripartite relationships rarely work! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Who is accountable? What if it goes wrong? If the SLA’s aren’t met, is it the designer or the builder? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If the SLA’s aren’t agreed in advance, they will be a source of conflict </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If the prime contractor cannot guarantee the SLA’s, the prime contractor has no idea whether the SLA’s can be met. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>That means he doesn’t have the experience to know whether the solution will meet the SLA’s. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Therefore, he’s either not done it before or he is not a prime contractor. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>You can only fix the price of the contract if the entire scope is known and locked </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If your programme slips, you can’t expect a sub-contractor to tolerate slippage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If change requests come into the programme, they should be impacted by ALL teams, including sub-contractors! </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Time and materials should be used in “requirements, capped T&M in “design” Fixed price for a complete programme should NEVER be entered into until these two phases are agreed, understood and signed off! </li></ul>
  58. 58. Managing the COMMERCIALS <ul><li>Always use a structured procurement process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Request for Information/Request for Proposal force the team to fully think through and document all the requirements before committing to a product </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Using a structured, weighted evaluation allows the products to be evaluated against each prioritised requirement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Typical evaluation criteria include </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Technical, Operational, Functional, Commercial, Implementation, Total cost of ownership </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kepner Tregoe is a common weighted evaluation procedure </li></ul></ul><ul><li>An RFI/RFP process is there to protect you & the team from accusations of favouritism </li></ul><ul><li>A well run process drives out best value. Note, not just CHEAPEST! </li></ul><ul><li>RFI/RFP doesn’t have to take six months. Can be done within two – three weeks if the process is rigorously defined and adhered to </li></ul><ul><li>Always publish a timetable to a decision AND STICK TO IT! </li></ul>
  59. 59. COMMERCIALS GOLDEN RULES <ul><li>If you MEASURE the wrong things, you create the wrong BEHAVIOURS which leads to the wrong OUTCOMES Software fix process example </li></ul><ul><li>CHEAPEST ISN’T ALWAYS BEST </li></ul>
  60. 60. Managing a programme’s PROCESSES NineDimensions approach
  61. 61. Managing the Processes <ul><li>The NineDimensions Approach </li></ul><ul><ul><li>RAID Management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Change Management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Financial Management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Status Management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deliverables Management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Planning & Estimating </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resource Management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quality & Governance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stakeholder Management </li></ul></ul>
  62. 62. Processes and controls <ul><li>There should be no need to describe how to fill out a load of forms/logs for Programme control. There are plenty of courses (MSP/Prince courses) that can teach you that! </li></ul><ul><li>There’s a spreadsheet included with the pack that has a RAID log that has everything I’ve ever needed to run a programme. </li></ul><ul><li>If you don’t know what your status is, you don’t know whether you’re going to be successful </li></ul><ul><li>Misreporting work as complete when it isn’t is a FIRING offence. </li></ul>
  63. 63. What level should I be managing at? <ul><li>Recommend managing at the “work-package” level </li></ul><ul><li>Dependencies between work-packages or external from the programme MUST be known </li></ul><ul><li>I can’t start this piece of work until..... PRE-REQUISITE </li></ul><ul><li>I can’t finish this piece of work until.... CO-REQUISITE </li></ul><ul><li>For a work-package to be “COMPLETE”, all work must have been finished, no-one should be working on it any more, all the deliverables should be signed off, the exit criteria should have been met. </li></ul><ul><li>It is NOT acceptable to mark a work-package as complete when work is still outstanding </li></ul><ul><li>It is extremely dangerous to mark a work-package as complete, and roll-up any work still outstanding into a NEW work-package (snowball effect, disguising slippage) </li></ul><ul><li>If a work-package lasts less than a week, you are managing at too lower level. </li></ul><ul><li>Each work-package should have a work-package description produced for it in advance of the work being started. It should be signed off by you and the client (the client should sign the consolidated stage-plan) </li></ul>
  64. 64. Work-package Descriptions <ul><li>What should be in a WDP? </li></ul><ul><li>Should be completed by </li></ul><ul><li>the person responsible </li></ul><ul><li>for performing the work </li></ul><ul><li>and signed off by the </li></ul><ul><li>person accountable for </li></ul><ul><li>it’s successful outcome </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Purpose of the work-package </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Approach to deliver it </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Owner (and lead performer) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inputs & Outputs (components) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dependencies & Constraints </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reporting Requirements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scope </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Milestones </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Costs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Acceptance Criteria </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reviewers & Sign-offs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Risks, Assumptions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Document Control </li></ul></ul>
  65. 65. RAGs <ul><li>It is essential that commonly agreed and understood status for RAGs are defined and communicated. Otherwise, one person’s Green is another person’s Amber. </li></ul>
  66. 66. Managing a programme’s PROCESSES A successful PMO
  67. 67. Managing the Processes <ul><li>A Successful PMO </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What does a good PMO do? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why do you need one? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How big should it be? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What if the client won’t pay for one? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you don’t have an excellent PMO, with a top-class PMO manager, you won’t have a clue what the status of your programme is </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you have time to undertake some of the PMO’s tasks, you aren’t managing a programme </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>There is a big difference between a programme management office and programme governance. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The PMO serves you! </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Programme Governance servers you and the organisation </li></ul></ul></ul>
  68. 68. Key Success Factors – what benefits does a PMO bring? <ul><li>When we know what we should be doing each week and we know whether we’re doing it/we’ve done it </li></ul><ul><li>We know what our deliverables are, who our resources are, what we’re spending, and how all these compare to plan </li></ul><ul><li>When everyone understands exactly what their role and empowerment is </li></ul><ul><li>When we have a management and governance structure which is efficient, embedded and trusted </li></ul><ul><li>When our decisions are explicitly made at the right level and accepted by our stakeholders </li></ul><ul><li>When everyone who has an interest in us understands what we’re doing </li></ul><ul><li>When our planning focus is months, not weeks </li></ul><ul><li>When our morale is sustained by our success </li></ul>
  69. 69. Programme Management Office Organisation & Activities <ul><li>Financial Controller </li></ul><ul><li>Order Management </li></ul><ul><li>Contract Management </li></ul><ul><li>Supplier Management </li></ul><ul><li>(Logistics Support) </li></ul><ul><li>(RAID Process) </li></ul><ul><li>(Change Process) </li></ul><ul><li>IT Work Orders </li></ul><ul><li>Workshop Support </li></ul><ul><li>Email Dlists </li></ul><ul><li>Logistics Support </li></ul><ul><li>Meeting Room Management </li></ul><ul><li>Senior Team Diary Mgt </li></ul><ul><li>Hotel Administration </li></ul><ul><li>Meeting Minutes </li></ul><ul><li>RAID Process Owner </li></ul><ul><li>Change Process Owner </li></ul><ul><li>(Financial Controller) </li></ul><ul><li>(Document Controller) </li></ul><ul><li>Stage Plan Delivery </li></ul><ul><li>PMO Processes Owner </li></ul><ul><li>Status Report Owner </li></ul><ul><li>Ad-hoc reporting </li></ul><ul><li>Quality Management </li></ul><ul><li>(Plan Manager) </li></ul><ul><li>Procedures Adherence </li></ul><ul><li>Audit Relationship </li></ul><ul><li>Governance </li></ul><ul><li>Integrated Plan Manager </li></ul><ul><li>Dependency Manager </li></ul><ul><li>Deliverables Tracking </li></ul><ul><li>Document Controller </li></ul><ul><li>Signoff Tracking </li></ul><ul><li>Future phase planning </li></ul><ul><li>(Quality Manager) </li></ul><ul><li>Programme Comms </li></ul><ul><li>Stakeholder Management </li></ul><ul><li>Steering Group Secretariat </li></ul><ul><li>Team Environment </li></ul><ul><li>Programme Brand </li></ul><ul><li>Workshop Support </li></ul><ul><li>Workstream Review/audit </li></ul><ul><li>Project audit </li></ul><ul><li>New starters </li></ul><ul><li>Organisation Maintenance </li></ul><ul><li>Performance Management </li></ul><ul><li>Contractor Roll-on/Roll-off </li></ul><ul><li>Resource Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Terms of Reference / RACIs </li></ul><ul><li>Role Description Management </li></ul><ul><li>Logistics / Desk Planning </li></ul>Programme Office Manager Programme Communications Analyst Programme Quality Assurance Programme Controller Financial Analyst Programme Controller Resources Programme Controller Plan Programme Administrator Programme Controller RAID/Change
  70. 70. KSFs – what does the role needs to succeed? <ul><li>Programme Manager </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Providing leadership and engagement to the team </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Programme Manager looks ahead and around </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PMO performs to the Programme Manager, but PM directs the PMO </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Says Yes, and says No – and No sticks </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Programme Office Manager </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Structure of c. 5-8 people which operates the detail </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Led by strong Operational Manager </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reporting to the Programme Manager, but empowered and equipped to run the machine </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>PMO drives and guides performers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Governance and internal programme processes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Workstreams follow the direction set by PMO </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Based on agreed, aligned plans not diktat! </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PMO is not just an administrative or advisory function </li></ul></ul>
  71. 71. Example of PMO service levels <ul><li>New starter (due to join) </li></ul><ul><li>Desk move </li></ul><ul><li>Access to document mgt tool </li></ul><ul><li>Access to process mapping tool </li></ul><ul><li>Access to Time reporting tool </li></ul><ul><li>Visio / Project </li></ul><ul><li>Laptop </li></ul><ul><li>External Access </li></ul><ul><li>Internet Access </li></ul><ul><li>Request for a hotel </li></ul><ul><li>Request for meeting / workshop support </li></ul><ul><li>Update to plan </li></ul><ul><li>Update to programme status </li></ul><ul><li>Change request </li></ul><ul><li>Addition to risks or issues </li></ul><ul><li>Request for a telephone </li></ul><ul><li>Purchase request (Purchase order CAPEX) </li></ul><ul><li>Request for a projector </li></ul><ul><li>Ad-hoc requests </li></ul>2 weeks 6 weeks 1 day 1 day 10 days 2 weeks 2 weeks 2 weeks 1 weeks 1 day 2 days 1 day 1 day 7 days 1 day 100 years 10 days Never - tbc tbc Request SLA Primary Contact
  72. 72. Programme Pitfalls and Assurance
  73. 73. Key attributes of a successful programme <ul><li>Managed, achievable expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Commonly believed in Programme Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Communication & Openness </li></ul><ul><li>Delegated Accountability </li></ul><ul><li>Passion & Commitment (from everyone to succeed) </li></ul>“ Changing the programme is not a weakness” “ Avoid shared workstream resource” “ Requirements MUST be unambiguously clear” “ If it can’t be said on one side of A4, the message is too complex” “ Avoid trying to change ‘too much’ in one release” “ Watch out for Powerpoint Frenzy or Meeting Mania” “ Beware of a dotted lines on organisation charts” “ TEST EARLY as possible - especially integration” “ Everyone in the business must be committed to the change” “ Watch for scope-creep by stealth – change requests” “ Be ready for the technology not to work or be late” “ NEVER, EVER be the first to implement a V1.0 solution” “ Know the desired outcome/vision before you start” “ Training Needs and User adoption are freqently under-estimated”
  74. 74. Programme Assurance <ul><li>Poor programme managers fear “assurance & audit” </li></ul><ul><li>Excellent programme managers EMBRACE “assurance & audit” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Another pair of eyes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No-one has all the right answers all the time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The assurer might spot something I’ve missed which means I succeed instead of fail </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>As time progresses, most programme managers tend to start to get tunnel vision on specific issues which can be hard to break out of and stand back from. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid being defensive. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Use assurance as the opportunity to draw from the assurers knowledge and skills too. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If they’ve pointed something out bad and it sounds accurate, acknowledge it and embrace change, don’t try to defend the status quo or the reasons why. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Few people get sacked for changing things not working or doing the right thing </li></ul></ul></ul>
  75. 75. Programme Assurance Survey <ul><li>Enclosed is a 100 question quick survey which a programme manager can use to get the temperature of things going well and things going not-so-well in a programme. </li></ul><ul><li>It should be completed by ALL team leaders and project managers in a programme. </li></ul><ul><li>It is also useful to distribute to a few team members (even though some of the questions aren’t relevant to them) </li></ul><ul><li>It assesses the programme dimensions outlined previously </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Risk </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organisation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Client </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Process </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The closer to 0 each score, the poorer the programme is. </li></ul><ul><li>Negative scores are VERY BAD! </li></ul>
  76. 76. MADDISON WARD LIMITED

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