Newsletter Is Dead Melbourne

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Charities use newsletters to communicate with donors. But often with mixed objectives and for mixed audiences. In this presentation we look at what makes good communications and what newsletters are for. Towards the end, all attendees critiqued each others newsletters (anonymously) and the result was a resounding disappointment. Only one of the newsletters were actually achieving good communications.

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  • Confusing messages – says we’re skint, however just received $2m bequest Promotes RG to already Reg donor
  • Newsletter Is Dead Melbourne

    1. 1. Welcome THE GAWLER FOUNDATION PENNINSULA HOSPICE SERVICE
    2. 2. The Art of Fundraising <ul><li>Welcome to attendees </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction of speakers: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sean Triner, Pareto Nicola Probyn, WWF-Aus John Burns, AIA </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    3. 3. Why are we running these Masterclasses? <ul><li>To provide training for charities </li></ul><ul><li>To provide fundraisers with practical tools they can implement in their workplace </li></ul><ul><li>To challenge, inform and motivate fundraisers </li></ul><ul><li>To tackle difficult issues </li></ul>
    4. 4. Copyright <ul><li>This presentation, and elements of it, may be used to help charities raise more money more effectively. You may use it to build a specific presentation to your board or staff within your organisation provided that Pareto Fundraising is given due credit. You may not distribute this presentation, or elements of this presentation to other organisations. </li></ul><ul><li>Specific permission needs to be obtained from Pareto Fundraising if you are presenting at a seminar or training session to which other organisations are invited. We will request a copy of that presentation from you, and request that Pareto Fundraising is credited accordingly. </li></ul>
    5. 5. Feedback forms <ul><li>Want your feedback today </li></ul><ul><li>Implement what you learn, let us know </li></ul><ul><li>Is important to us </li></ul><ul><li>Know we are being effective </li></ul><ul><li>Will keep us running these (they cost a lot!) </li></ul>
    6. 6. Introduction <ul><li>Sean Triner – Managing Director, Pareto Fundraising </li></ul><ul><li>Extensive industry experience in UK </li></ul><ul><li>Expert on Australian fundraising market </li></ul><ul><li>“ Nearly always, newsletters are a waste of time” - Sean, April 2005 </li></ul>
    7. 7. The Newsletter is Dead – Long live the donor update! Pareto Fundraising Masterclasses
    8. 9. Today’s Masterclass <ul><li>Introductions </li></ul><ul><li>Why are donor communications important? </li></ul><ul><li>Audience straw poll </li></ul><ul><li>What makes GOOD donor communications? </li></ul><ul><li>What makes BAD donor communications? </li></ul><ul><li>Why newsletters? For and against </li></ul><ul><li>Newsletter evaluation exercise </li></ul><ul><li>Break </li></ul>
    9. 10. Today’s Masterclass <ul><li>Feedback from exercise </li></ul><ul><li>Getting it right </li></ul><ul><li>WWF-Australia case study </li></ul><ul><li>Alternatives </li></ul><ul><li>Amnesty International Australia case study </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusions </li></ul><ul><li>Q&A session </li></ul>
    10. 12. Brainstorm <ul><li>Why are donor communications so important? </li></ul>
    11. 13. Why are donor communications important? <ul><li>Retention of donors </li></ul><ul><li>Tells donors what is happening with their money </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback on the organisation itself </li></ul><ul><li>Makes the donor feel involved </li></ul><ul><li>Creates advocates for your cause </li></ul>
    12. 14. Why are donor communications important? <ul><li>Emotional involvement </li></ul><ul><li>Recognition of donor’s contribution </li></ul><ul><li>Sense of shared accomplishment </li></ul><ul><li>Enables you to promote your vision for your organisation </li></ul><ul><li>Method of delivering your services (ie educational content) </li></ul>
    13. 15. Facts about donor communications <ul><li>According to the American Research Study on Donor Communication, 2003: </li></ul><ul><li>Only 47% of charities correspond with donors apart from solicitations </li></ul><ul><li>94% of donors say that charities they support never or hardly ever call them up without asking for another gift </li></ul><ul><li>56% of charities feel that corresponding with donors without solicitations is the most effective way of communicating with them </li></ul>
    14. 16. Facts about donor communications <ul><li>68% of donors would prefer to receive a short one page bulletin on the program that their donation had been targeted to </li></ul><ul><li>Only 19% of donors are satisfied with the current length of charities newsletters </li></ul><ul><li>69% of donors say “I don’t have time to read newsletters thoroughly” </li></ul><ul><li>53% of donors are concerned about the cost of newsletters </li></ul>
    15. 17. Facts about donor communications <ul><li>81% of donors say having their names published in a charity’s newsletter has no influence on whether they will give again </li></ul><ul><li>54% of donors think newsletters could be improved by providing more targeted information on how donations are being used </li></ul>
    16. 18. The Major Gifts Cultivation Model Make the ask The right person at the right time asking for the right thing Thanking and ongoing stewardship Identify and Involve prospects in the cause. Develop relationship
    17. 19. The Major Gifts Cultivation Model Make the ask The right person at the right time asking for the right thing Thanking and ongoing stewardship Identify and Involve prospects in the cause. Develop relationship
    18. 20. What does everyone here do? <ul><li>Straw poll </li></ul><ul><li>Do you communicate with your donors without asking for money? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you do a newsletter? </li></ul><ul><li>Which media? Print, online, email etc </li></ul><ul><li>How often? </li></ul>
    19. 21. Types of non-ask communications <ul><li>Tell me! </li></ul>
    20. 22. Brainstorm <ul><li>What makes GOOD donor communications? </li></ul>
    21. 23. What makes GOOD donor communications? <ul><li>Regularity </li></ul><ul><li>Honesty </li></ul><ul><li>Reliability </li></ul><ul><li>One to one communication </li></ul><ul><li>Relevant </li></ul><ul><li>Recognition of donor’s contribution </li></ul><ul><li>Emotional stories </li></ul><ul><li>Information about beneficiaries </li></ul><ul><li>Tells donors what impact their donations are making </li></ul>
    22. 25. Brainstorm <ul><li>What makes BAD donor communications? </li></ul>
    23. 26. What makes BAD donor communications? <ul><li>Internal focus </li></ul><ul><li>One size fits all </li></ul><ul><li>Irrelevant </li></ul><ul><li>No info on how funds being used </li></ul><ul><li>Clear waste of money </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of focus </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of purpose </li></ul><ul><li>Confusing messages </li></ul>
    24. 27. Why newsletters? <ul><li>Because they are an effective method of donor communications…? </li></ul><ul><li>And we know donor communications are important. </li></ul>
    25. 28. Why are donor communications important? <ul><li>Retention of donors </li></ul><ul><li>Tells donors what is happening with their money </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback on the organisation itself </li></ul><ul><li>Makes the donor feel involved </li></ul><ul><li>Creates advocates for your cause </li></ul>
    26. 29. Why are donor communications important? <ul><li>Emotional involvement </li></ul><ul><li>Recognition of donor’s contribution </li></ul><ul><li>Sense of shared accomplishment </li></ul><ul><li>Enables you to promote your vision for your organisation </li></ul><ul><li>Method of delivering your services (ie educational content) </li></ul>
    27. 30. The real reasons? <ul><li>Need somewhere to thank the sponsors </li></ul><ul><li>Donors say they like them </li></ul><ul><li>Communications pays for them, not the Fundraising department! </li></ul>
    28. 31. The real reasons? <ul><li>Board/staff/volunteers like them </li></ul><ul><li>“ We’ve always done them” </li></ul><ul><li>Originally used as ‘appeals’ </li></ul><ul><li>They do make some money </li></ul><ul><li>Because everyone else does! </li></ul>
    29. 33. The true purpose of the donor newsletter <ul><li>“ But it’s not the physical object itself that donors want. What they do want, though, is the content: the stories, the photos, the proof that their money did good, the emotional gratification of knowing they made the world a better place. That’s what you give a donor, through your newsletter. Not a piece of printed paper; but a warm, wonderful feeling.” </li></ul><ul><li>© Tom Ahern, Ahern Communications, 2005 </li></ul>
    30. 34. The Perfect Newsletter* *in our subjective opinion…. <ul><li>Is relevant to the audience </li></ul><ul><li>Is focused on the link between the donor and the need </li></ul><ul><li>Creates a feeling </li></ul><ul><li>Is relevant in context of other communications </li></ul><ul><li>Is well written </li></ul>
    31. 35. The Perfect Newsletter* *in our subjective opinion…. <ul><li>Has more ‘You’s than ‘I’s than ‘We’s </li></ul><ul><li>Celebrates success </li></ul><ul><li>Expresses the humanity of the need </li></ul><ul><li>Is not internally focused </li></ul><ul><li>Is timely </li></ul>
    32. 37. Newsletter evaluation exercise <ul><li>Score sheet in your pack </li></ul><ul><li>Someone else’s newsletter in your pack </li></ul><ul><li>Write the name of the newsletter’s charity on top of your score sheet </li></ul><ul><li>BUT don’t give your own name – all scores fed back anonymously </li></ul><ul><li>Rate newsletter based on criteria </li></ul>
    33. 38. BREAK – 15 mins <ul><li>We will distribute the scored newsletters during the break – when you come back to your seat, you will find your independently assessed newsletter. </li></ul>
    34. 39. Feedback from exercise <ul><li>Is anyone willing to share their results? </li></ul><ul><li>Comments? </li></ul>
    35. 41. Getting it right <ul><li>WWF-Australia </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluated their newsletter in 2004 </li></ul><ul><li>Decided to change it </li></ul><ul><li>Now in process of rolling out new one </li></ul>
    36. 42. Introduction <ul><li>Nicola Probyn, Direct Marketing Manager Special Projects, WWF-Australia </li></ul><ul><li>Been at WWF for 2.5 years </li></ul><ul><li>Manages F2F acquisition and retention </li></ul><ul><li>Project managing the new magazine development because it is a key piece of the retention strategy </li></ul>
    37. 43. Case study - WWF-Australia <ul><li>Evaluation process </li></ul><ul><li>Why change? What reasons? </li></ul><ul><li>What was brief for new newsletter? </li></ul>
    38. 44. Mock ups of new newsletter
    39. 46. Alternatives to newsletters <ul><li>Currently, many newsletters are waste of money </li></ul><ul><li>Can be much more effective </li></ul><ul><li>Can be personalised </li></ul><ul><li>Usually much simpler </li></ul><ul><li>Can be cheaper </li></ul><ul><li>Other ways </li></ul>
    40. 47. Donor care letters <ul><li>Personalised </li></ul><ul><li>One to one conversation </li></ul><ul><li>Tells donor what is happening with their money </li></ul><ul><li>Reflects relationship </li></ul><ul><li>Includes giving history </li></ul><ul><li>Very specific feedback </li></ul><ul><li>A ‘letter with news’ </li></ul>
    41. 48. Non-appeal appeals <ul><li>Appeal letter </li></ul><ul><li>All the strengths of normal letter </li></ul><ul><li>Gripping case studies </li></ul><ul><li>Detailed information </li></ul><ul><li>No ask </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on specific area of charity </li></ul>
    42. 49. Examples of letters with news <ul><li>My mum’s annual update </li></ul><ul><li>“ Dear Christine </li></ul><ul><li>I can’t believe how quickly the year has gone. Richard has been his usual self, getting free flights in exchange for some photos of those historic planes he loves so much. He did manage to get me into one and we did the loop…Sean’s still in Australia, I think he stands on street corners making money for charities. But no Christmas carols I hope! We are going to see him…” </li></ul>
    43. 50. Personal stories work Extract from http://www3.caringbridge.org/tx/joinerboys/ Getting on with all the news. We went to the One Step Closer walk in Allen in early April and it was a huge success. Last I heard, over $12,000 dollars was raised. Keep in mind that this money goes directly to finding a cure for MLD – so we consider this fundraising huge! It was so nice to meet Rhonda (Nathan’s mum) and get to share some time with her. The crappy part of this is that we are united in grief that is still a bit overwhelming. It was pretty emotional for me, but my group of pals were there to bring me back around. We managed to squeeze in some fun in the big city of Dallas and we just had a blast. I think that we all needed a cleansing weekend after the last few months. Make sure that you check out the Stennis Foundation website at www.stennisfoundation.org for more information on upcoming events. Remember, you do not have to actually walk to make a difference. The 1st Annual Joiner Boys Memorial Golf Tournament was held on April 22nd and was a huge success also, even if the West Texas Spring weather did not cooperate. It was cold, cloudy and windy that day, but we managed to have a good time and raise some great money. 96 golfers raised a total of over $22,000 that day for building the tribute playground! Can you believe that?!? Plans are underway to start construction later this year and it is going to be wonderful. Thanks to all that came and played and donated. We are still honored and humbled that so many people remember….
    44. 51. Amnesty International Australia Case Study <ul><li>John Burns, Donor Development Manager, Amnesty International Australia </li></ul><ul><li>Been at AIA for 5 years </li></ul><ul><li>Responsible for direct marketing to the contributor base </li></ul><ul><li>Has worked extensively with Pareto Fundraising on specialised donor communications. </li></ul>
    45. 52. Amnesty International Australia Case Study <ul><li>Part of AIA remit – continuing relevant communications </li></ul><ul><li>Why donor care is important </li></ul><ul><li>Why we do a newsletter </li></ul><ul><li>Our donor care letter </li></ul>
    46. 53. Case study – Amnesty International Australia
    47. 54. Conclusions <ul><li>We need to invest more in donor care </li></ul><ul><li>The perfect newsletter is possible, but it takes a lot of work </li></ul><ul><li>There are other ways to deliver excellent donor communication </li></ul><ul><li>If you focus on donor care now, you will reap the benefits in the future </li></ul><ul><li>It’s just the right thing to do. </li></ul>
    48. 56. Q&A session
    49. 57. Pareto Fundraising Masterclass <ul><li>Have we met your objectives? </li></ul>
    50. 58. <ul><li>Thank you </li></ul><ul><li>Pareto Fundraising </li></ul><ul><li>www.paretofundraising.com </li></ul>
    51. 59. Useful links - <ul><li>http:// www.aherncomm.com / </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.donorcentred.ca/dcf/index.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://www3.caringbridge.org/tx/joinerboys/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.amnesty.org.au/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.wwf.org.au/ </li></ul>

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