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Final Messaging

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  • 1. April 26, 2011 KEY MESSAGES & BRAND STRATEGY STREETSIDE STORIES
  • 2. Agenda
    • Introductions
    • Why We’re Here
    • The Process
    • Discovery
    • Positioning
    • Messaging
    • What’s Next?
  • 3.
    • Taproot Players Taproot Projects
    • Shahram Teimouri – Account Director 4
    • Cherlyn Medina – Project Manager 4
    • Stefanie Daniel – Marketing Manager 1
    • Ed Kamrin – Copywriter 8
    • John Hyde – Brand Strategist 3
    Taproot Team
  • 4.
    • Streetside Board and Team
    • Linda Johnson – Executive Director
    • Shannon Petrello – Development Director
    • Chrissy Anderson-Zavala – Co-Deputy Director
    • Amanda Marlow – Outreach Coordinator
    • Kari Fox – Fundraising Associate
    • Greg De Benedictis – Outreach Associate
    • Chelsea Hirschton – Program Coordinator
    • Melissa Wong Renati – Administrative Coordinator
    • Cecilia Ottinger Long – Teaching Artist
    • Ken Tse – Board Member
    • Dale Hamakawa – Board Member
    • Varun Gupta – Board Member
    • Emily Chan – Board Member
    Streetside Stories
  • 5. Agenda
    • Introductions
    • Why We’re Here
    • The Process
    • Discovery
    • Positioning
    • Messaging
    • What’s Next?
  • 6.
    • Streetside Stories needed a strategy for communicating their identity and activities to their target audience.
    • The Taproot team was tasked with helping create a consistent, coherent, and meaningful way to communicate the brand.
    • Moreover, Streetside is at a significant crossroads in organizational growth, serving more youth than ever before.
    • Competing for funding and donations in this environment increases the need for a strong differentiated identity and clear, relevant messaging.
    Why We’re Here
  • 7.
    • Establishing brand strategy and key messages will help Streetside:
    • Reach more students with high quality programming
    • Create a sustainable organization that meets community needs
    • Take an advocacy role in local, state, and national politics
    • Raise more money from individuals and corporations
    • Create new partnerships with schools and community organizations
    Why We’re Here
  • 8. Agenda
    • Introductions
    • Why We’re Here
    • The Process
    • Discovery
    • Positioning
    • Messaging
    • What’s Next?
  • 9.
    • Developing a brand strategy and key messages follows a logical process:
    • Interview as many people and as varied an audience as possible to determine brand perceptions, strengths, weaknesses, and opportunities
    • Report “discovery findings” to organization and discuss
    • Develop several “brand positions” that attempt to capture unique value for key audiences; review, discuss, refine
    • Focus on one position that best reflects organization’s current and aspirational brand
    • Develop messaging that expresses the brand positioning in several different formats for several different audiences; iterate and refine
    • Present final brand positioning and messaging
    The Process
  • 10. Agenda
    • Introductions
    • Why We’re Here
    • The Process
    • Discovery
    • Positioning
    • Messaging
    • What’s Next?
  • 11.
    • Encourages students’ “ownership” of identity : Streetside Stories allows students to recognize who they are, in order to develop into more confident individuals.
    • Enables renewal/transformation: Streetside Stories has helped students develop a new attitude towards literacy and education.
    • Innovative, results-producing curriculum: The Streetside Stories program itself is unique and has been effectively developed for over 20 years.
    • Fosters relationship-building in the classroom: Streetside Stories enables students to understand their peers by creating a community of trust and safety to foster renewed learning.
    • Educational reform “trailblazer”: Streetside Stories sets out to improve current educational standards by striving to be an innovative leader and model.
    • “… our program has shown improvement in literacy scores on standardized test scores”
    Discovery Findings
  • 12.
    • Encourages students’ “ownership” of identity : Streetside Stories allows students to recognize who they are, in order to develop into more confident individuals.
    • Enables renewal/transformation: Streetside Stories has helped students develop a new attitude towards literacy and education.
    • Innovative, results-producing curriculum: The Streetside Stories program itself is unique and has been effectively developed for over 20 years.
    Discovery Findings “ Before, I was scared to talk around people.” “ Now students have a story that belongs to them.” “There are teachers who did not believe that their students could read or write until Streetside started working with them – and they were astounded! ” “…our program has shown improvement in literacy scores on standardized test scores.”
  • 13. Agenda
    • Introductions
    • Why We’re Here
    • The Process
    • Discovery
    • Positioning
    • Messaging
    • What’s Next?
  • 14.
    • What is a brand position ?
    • An idea that answers these questions:
    • Who are we?
    • What do we offer?
    • What are we especially good at?
    • Who cares about that?
    • Why does it matter to them?
    • What makes us unique?
    • It’s also:
    • A theme that everyone in the organization can rally around
    • A foundation for what you say and do
    Positioning
  • 15.
    • Streetside offers programs that teach students the art of storytelling, using their own lives as the point of departure. As they learn to narrate their stories, students can begin to see new possibilities for their lives in school – and beyond.
    Streetside Positioning
  • 16. Agenda
    • Introductions
    • Why We’re Here
    • The Process
    • Discovery
    • Positioning
    • Messaging
    • What’s Next?
  • 17.
    • Streetside Stories
    • Who are we?
    • What do we offer?
    • What are we especially good at?
    • Who cares about that?
    • Why does it matter to them?
    • What makes us unique?
    Messaging
  • 18.
    • Streetside Stories
    • A San Francisco Bay Area nonprofit founded in 1989, Streetside Stories helps students share the true stories of their lives through writing, the arts, and technology. In the classroom and the community, we create a safe, respectful environment where young people can voice their stories and be heard. As they share their stories, new possibilities emerge for their lives, in school and beyond. Over more than twenty years, our nationally recognized programs have served thousands of young people and delivered proven academic results.
    Messaging
  • 19.
    • Key features
    • Student-centered: Streetside programs focus on students and the true stories they share.
    • An environment of respect and trust: Streetside programs take place within a safe learning environment where each young person’s voice is valued and heard.
    • Inclusive: Streetside engages different learning styles, interests, and levels of English language proficiency.
    • Passionate: Streetside believes young people have important stories that deserve to be heard. We share a deep respect for students’ lived experience and desire to see students grow.
    • Fun: Streetside feels all young people should experience the joy of creativity, and we provide that opportunity as many students as possible.
    • Effective: Streetside’s teaching artists use effective, tested curricula in their work with schools and communities.
    Messaging
  • 20.
    • Key benefits
    • Encourages students to embrace and share their true stories: Streetside programs prize the unique lives and experiences of young people. In telling their true stories, students build confidence and community.
    • Facilitates authentic learning: Our programs inspire students to learn more authentically by connecting their lived experience to writing, the arts, and technology.
    • Produces results: We create a collaborative environment that promotes learning. It’s an important part of our nationally recognized model, and it helps young people achieve academic success and imagine new possibilities for their lives.
    Messaging
  • 21.
    • About Streetside Stories (PR Boilerplate)
    • Founded in 1989, Streetside Stories is a San Francisco Bay Area nonprofit that teaches storytelling through writing, the arts, and technology. Our programs encourage young people to draw on their own experiences for inspiration. As they share their true stories, they begin to see new possibilities for their lives in and out of school. Over our twenty-two-year history, we have worked with thousands of young people, creating a respectful learning environment that promotes academic results and personal growth. Streetside Stories programs are made possible through grants, individual contributions, and the enthusiastic participation of volunteers. To learn more, visit www.streetside.org.
    Messaging
  • 22.
    • Key messages by audience
    • Foundations/government agencies: Supported by federal, state, and local government agencies and numerous foundations, Streetside Stories offers a nationally recognized model for arts education. Our research shows that Streetside Stories’ student-centered curriculum has led to improved literacy skills and increased engagement in the classroom.
    Messaging
  • 23.
    • Key messages by audience
    • School administrators: Founded in 1989, Streetside Stories offers a nationally recognized and tested approach to literacy and arts education. Our standards-based, sequential program promotes the development of literacy skills and provides additional access to technology and the arts. Our teaching artists create a safe, respectful environment in the classroom, encouraging students to voice their stories and allowing them to be heard.
    Messaging
  • 24.
    • Key messages by audience
    • Individual donors: With the challenge of reduced funding, schools have fewer resources for [arts education/English language learners/technology education], yet we know these programs can make a world of difference for a young person. Streetside Stories helps meet that need. Our nationally recognized, innovative programs help young people share their true stories [through the arts/technology]. In the process, they improve their literacy skills, and see new possibilities emerge for their lives in school – and beyond.
    Messaging
  • 25.
    • Elevator pitch
    • Through writing, the arts, and technology, Streetside Stories helps young people share their stories. As young people tell the true stories of their lives, new possibilities emerge in school – and beyond.
    Messaging
  • 26. Agenda
    • Introductions
    • Why We’re Here
    • The Process
    • Discovery
    • Positioning
    • Messaging
    • What’s Next?
  • 27.
    • Using key messages
    • Key messages can be used in copywriting for brochures, flyers, donor letters, event invitations, video, the website, and elsewhere.
    • Use brand position as core idea and tailor to specific audiences.
    • Verbal delivery is as important as print delivery.
    • Use the elevator pitch to introduce Streetside Stories – not necessarily verbatim, but with shades of color as appropriate.
    • Use the press release boilerplate early and often.
    What’s Next?
  • 28.
    • When creating new content (marketing materials, web pages, a letter to donors), ask yourself:
    • Does it fit with the core idea of our brand?
    • Does it express our key features and benefits?
    • Are there opportunities to highlight our points of differentiation?
    • Will it help us achieve our vision?
    • Will it resonate with the audiences we’ve identified?
    • If “no” for any of the above, think about how to make changes so you can say, “yes” – or determine whether it’s a worthwhile undertaking to begin with.
    What’s Next?
  • 29.
    • Now that the messaging has been clarified…
    • Do we have a marketing plan that lets us take advantage of a more focused message?
    • Should we consider a visual identity refresh? A new name?
    • What’s different now? What changes? Consider:
    • Fundraising events
    • Interviews with the media
    • Staff meetings
    • How you answer the phone
    What’s Next?
  • 30. Thank you!
  • 31.
    • Shahram Teimouri, Account Director
    • Shahram has over 10 years of experience leading branding and marketing projects for pharmaceutical, consumer goods, technology, and non-profit clients. He is currently an Account Director for digital and interactive marketing company Eveo where conceives and delivers targeted, unique, and impactful ways to grow brands. He has a broad range of marketing experience that includes the management of journal advertising, online marketing, direct mail, and event-based promotion. Earlier in his career he focused on brand strategy and market research. His past clients include Amgen, DuPont, Goldman Sachs, Mack Trucks, Novartis, Pepperidge Farm, Roche, Sanofi-Aventis, Sirius Satellite Radio, Steak n Shake, and Unilever.
    Bios
  • 32.
    • Cherlyn Medina, Project Manager
    • Cherlyn graduated from USF with a focus on Finance and recently from JFKU with a JD. She has 5 plus years experience in marketing and business development. Cherlyn has also done international pro bono work and legal research in India and the Philippines. She is currently interning at the Office of the Public Defender in San Francisco as she anxiously awaits the results of her bar exam.
    Bios
  • 33.
    • Ed Kamrin, Copywriter
    • Ed has nearly twenty years' experience in writing and communications. He is currently a consultant and client manager with Wordwright Communications, where he provides writing and communications strategy services for clients including Amgen, SunPower, and Gilead Sciences. Earlier, he served as senior writer and editor for specialty health care companies including LifeMasters and OptumHealth. Before beginning his business career, Ed spent seven years as an English/ESL teacher in schools and colleges. He earned a B.A. in English at Swarthmore College and completed graduate studies in applied linguistics at the University of Helsinki. Ed has completed seven Taproot projects, including serving as copywriter for the Friends of the San Francisco Public Library's most recent annual report.
    Bios
  • 34.
    • Stefanie Daniel, Marketing Manager
    • Stefanie is a brand consultant at Landor Associates. She has led projects in research, naming, key messaging, visual identity and brand strategy for F100 clients spanning the retail, QSR, transportation, entertainment and financial services industries. Prior to joining Landor, Stefanie managed digital marketing strategy and implementation for Qantas Airways, CKE Restaurants and the National Basketball Association.
    Bios
  • 35.
    • John Hyde, Brand Strategist
    • John is the principal and founder of Bullet-Marketing.com, a branding and marketing agency that serves small and midsize businesses. He brings to the Taproot team 15 years of experience in technology marketing at companies such as Documentum, EMC, Open Text, and McAfee. He started his career as a copywriter after graduating from UC Berkeley, and has taken on increasingly strategic roles within marketing and communications before launching his own consulting business in 2009. He currently works with clients such as McAfee, i365, OpenText, and Citrix.
    Bios

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